How to create raised tread pattern in stainless with a punch or chisel
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 59
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    NEW ZEALAND
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default How to create raised tread pattern in stainless with a punch or chisel

    Hi all,

    I am very much a novice at metal fabrication, and I'm looking for some advice on a small project.

    I'm looking to recreate a motorcycle brake pedal from an old Harley out of stainless (see links below for good quality images). The pedal has a tread pattern on it, made from raised divots in the steel. They appear to have been made by digging into the steel on an angle with some sort of chisel or punch? Perhaps using a die or guide?

    Can anyone give me some clues as to how I could go about recreating these? Ideally by myself with hand tools, or what type of shop I could take this to?

    Thanks!!

    Dropbox - IMG_5991.jpeg - Simplify your life
    Dropbox - IMG_5992.jpeg - Simplify your life
    Dropbox - IMG_5993.jpeg - Simplify your life
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_5991.jpg   img_5992.jpg   img_5993.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    6,965
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1266
    Likes (Received)
    3975

    Default

    I don't know about that pedal, it looks pretty crude, but for the look you want, I think you'd use a dimpling die pressed from the back side. Or, start with a piece of metal that is already dimpled.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    1,681
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1281
    Likes (Received)
    730

    Default

    Dots of weld metal. Mig or Tig are likely the best options.

  4. Likes James H Clark, Trueturning liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    2,872
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2936
    Likes (Received)
    1819

    Default

    If you use the dropbox links you can zoom in to see them better.

    I would put a 45 degree angle on a punch and see if driving it at an angle to raise the bump, then hammer bump to smooth it a bit, heat for smoothing might help. Get a scrap piece and try to replicate, might have to try different angles or techniques to get it to look right.

    Edit: It could be that the raised part was originally left kind of sharp for grip, the current profile is after years of wear.

  6. Likes nickfracture, neilho liked this post
  7. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,576
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've seen it done with an ironworker punch station.
    IIRC a 1/4" punch was installed, and the die button installed was a 3/8" dia.

  8. Likes Trueturning liked this post
  9. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    2,872
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2936
    Likes (Received)
    1819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I've seen it done with an ironworker punch station.
    IIRC a 1/4" punch was installed, and the die button installed was a 3/8" dia.
    If you use the dropbox links you can see they were not punched from backside. I would liken it more to the start of an engraving, just a bigger punch and deeper gouge.

  10. Likes nickfracture liked this post
  11. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    21,576
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    If you use the dropbox links you can see they were not punched from backside. I would liken it more to the start of an engraving, just a bigger punch and deeper gouge.
    I did not follow the linky. I just looked at the posted pix.

    however, who cares if the backside of the originals is not punched ?

  12. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    NEW ZEALAND
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    1

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    I would liken it more to the start of an engraving, just a bigger punch and deeper gouge.
    Yes, you're on the right track. There is an oval-shaped gouge leading into each bump.. They have definitely been dug up from the front side, rather than being punched from behind.

  13. Likes mhajicek liked this post
  14. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Location
    Eastern PA
    Posts
    1,125
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    222
    Likes (Received)
    808

    Default

    Back in the day that's how rasps and files were made. The teeth were raised with a hammer and chisel, one at a time, in the desired size and tooth form..........Bob

  15. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    2,872
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2936
    Likes (Received)
    1819

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post

    however, who cares if the backside of the originals is not punched ?
    If trying to match another piece, or make it look original (no idea if that is factory original), then you have to use the same techniques.

    Nick, I would sharpen a punch at 45 degrees and come in at about 45 degree angle, your workpiece will need to be well secured so all the energy of blows goes into raising the burr, instead of just sliding the piece across the work bench. Probably going to take some practice so you don't punch all the way through.

  16. Likes eKretz liked this post
  17. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    California, Ventura county
    Posts
    2,056
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    943
    Likes (Received)
    907

    Default

    Make a die that has the raised dot pattern
    Then a punch to make the gouge that would be forced into the die to give the dot shape.

    Or could be do the gouge then use a die to uniformly form the dot and gauge.

    Wouldn’t be surprised if it was done hot

  18. #12
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    295
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6
    Likes (Received)
    81

    Default

    I don't think you have the tools at your disposal to press the dimples.

    Have you though of Drill and Tap 6-32 holes, then install round head screws for the dimples. Fill the heads with 60-40 soft solder if required. Stack the screws in place on the back side and file smooth.

    Roger

  19. #13
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    6,965
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1266
    Likes (Received)
    3975

    Default

    My earlier comments were made with the assumption that the goal would be to achieve a result that is attractive, uniform, and long lasting. That's why I said the part shown is pretty crude...it's someone attempt (I assume) to achieve a look but didn't quite hit the mark.

    If the goal is only to have a pedal with bumps, then all sorts of methods will work. If you must use frontal assault, you'd need to find a way to ensure a very uniform location of each bump, and control the depth of each gouge. That's a lot of work, when starting with a dimpled piece of steel would most likely be better anyway. Lastly, a gouged-up bump will seldom last long due to the shape of the bump....a die-dimpled bump will have noticeably longer wear.

  20. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    88
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    43

    Default

    Drill some holes and pluck down some solid rivets. Weld them in from behind and grind it smooth.

    McMaster-Carr

  21. #15
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    2,823
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    228
    Likes (Received)
    1262

    Default

    There are a lot of ways to do this but you specifically asked for a method that you could use basic hand tools. If I had to approximate what you have there, I would mark out the pattern you want and drill starter holes where you want the dimples. Not all the way through, just deep enough to start a half round cape chisel and keep it from sliding off the work. Support the work well and raise a divot where you want the dimples. You can dress them down if they are too sharp or look uneven.


    chisel.jpg

  22. #16
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    13,871
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    797
    Likes (Received)
    4638

    Default

    Wood rasps are still hand made and here is a video of a French company that is well known for expensive and very good tools.

    The Making of Auriou Rasps - YouTube

    You can see that a skilled craftsman can create the teeth with a hammer and chisel very quickly without using any device to locate the punch marks. They say that the slight irregularity in tooth locations makes a rasp perform better.

    Larry

  23. Likes cyanidekid, trevj liked this post
  24. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Location
    Reddington, N.J., U.S.A.
    Posts
    3,600
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    645
    Likes (Received)
    417

    Default

    A question that will influence the chosen method. How much is the customer willing to pay for a part that exactly duplicates the original?

  25. Likes digger doug liked this post
  26. #18
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    rochester, ny
    Posts
    2,327
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    570
    Likes (Received)
    737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    They say that the slight irregularity in tooth locations makes a rasp perform better.

    Larry
    This is true, they cut WAY faster! Well worth the expense if you do a lot of hand shaping work with them

  27. Likes Winterfalke liked this post
  28. #19
    Join Date
    Feb 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Maryland
    Posts
    152
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2
    Likes (Received)
    49

    Default

    I doubt it was done by hand. Who would make the bumps by hand, then cut the oval hole which ruins a bunch of the bumps they just made. I am thinking some kind of sliding press made the bumps then the oval hole was cut.

  29. Likes Winterfalke liked this post
  30. #20
    Join Date
    Jan 2002
    Location
    West Coast, USA
    Posts
    9,147
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    603
    Likes (Received)
    6668

    Default

    Hope your old Harley doesn't need many more parts replicated . . .


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •