How to create raised tread pattern in stainless with a punch or chisel - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    This video was the first that came to mind when I saw the pictures.

    A fella could do a lot worse than to take a closer look at the marks on the original pedals, as well as noting that the shape of the punch used to stitch the rasps in the video, is NOT a round punch cut off at an angle, rather it's a vee on the one side, and flat on the other.

    With the correct punch shape and a decent size hammer, I figure it would have been only a minute or so per pedal, if even, to knock up the 'grip'.
    13d92917-cbd1-4a4e-a43a-5fae6d610fa0.jpg


    Looks like this was done with a round punch near as I can tell. The upper right divot is about as perfect a parabola as your likely to see.

    Denis

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  3. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    13d92917-cbd1-4a4e-a43a-5fae6d610fa0.jpg


    Looks like this was done with a round punch near as I can tell. The upper right divot is about as perfect a parabola as your likely to see.

    Denis
    You are likely right, from the clearer photo.

    Like as not, it was the guy that was installing them, pulled the pedal off the shelf or hook or however they kept the parts, walloped a hand full of raised divots over the surface, and got on with his day.

    It surprises me, when stuff like this comes up, how many people can look at an end result like that, and have no idea how the stuff was done.

    Makes me really appreciate the shop classes I was able to take, and the experiences I have had since.

  4. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    13d92917-cbd1-4a4e-a43a-5fae6d610fa0.jpg


    Looks like this was done with a round punch near as I can tell. The upper right divot is about as perfect a parabola as your likely to see.

    Denis
    And likely it was done as piece work, which was quite common back in the day. A highly skilled worker could make a better than normal wage by being both good and fast.

  5. #44
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    Amazing how many commented without really looking at the pix.

    And how many got the gist of Kustomizer's post?

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  7. #45
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    I would drill a small dimple at each location. Then fill each dimple with a small piece of carbide and silver solder it all together. Maybe the carbide found inside a hard facing rod? Or broken carbide endmills. I have a handfull of broken 1/8 endmills I bought on the bay for boring bar cutters.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I would drill a small dimple at each location. Then fill each dimple with a small piece of carbide and silver solder it all together. Maybe the carbide found inside a hard facing rod? Or broken carbide endmills. I have a handfull of broken 1/8 endmills I bought on the bay for boring bar cutters.
    Bill D
    For function that would likely be superior but it wouldn't match the appearance of the original.

  9. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by dalmatiangirl61 View Post
    Thanks for saving me the time, I was getting ready to give it a try myself.

    I'm questioning some of you guys reading comprehension skills, the op specifically said he wanted to replicate the part and pattern, yet most of you suggested "better" ways that in no way replicated the part, although they may have produced more uniform dimples
    The OP is replicating the part in Stainless steel. In terms of authenticity, all bets are off.
    I doubt the finished hog will be judged in the equivalent of Pebble Beach Concours d'Elegance

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  11. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by reggie_obe View Post
    In terms of authenticity, all bets are off.
    I've got $5 that says this is not a Harley factory part. Even back in 1920 they didn't do stuff like this.

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    If I had to guess, I would agree that it was machine made. Likely done hot, the edge of the sheet was fed through a press with a row of sharp edged round punches coming in at an angle to raise a divot. The oval slot looks to be added after the divoting. For a one off, I would try cutting a hardwood guide block you can feed a sharp punch through and smack it with a hammer. The punch doesn't need to be round, just have a round cutting face at the bottom were it will interact with the stock. An oval ejector pin and guide may be a good place to start, but I don't know how long it will last coldworking stainless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    I've got $5 that says this is not a Harley factory part. Even back in 1920 they didn't do stuff like this.
    Indian and harley both did something similar, Indian had a rubber piece that slid over like a finger glove and the serrations helped keep it from sliding off, Harley's rubber pads had a bolt out the back through the slot with a nut and washer on the back, their serrations kept it from turning, getting loose and falling off, the simple function of both to keep a rubber pad on. When installed they are not visable, in the package when you buy it they are. Need an address to send the 5 bucks?

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  15. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Winterfalke View Post
    If I had to guess, I would agree that it was machine made. Likely done hot, the edge of the sheet was fed through a press with a row of sharp edged round punches coming in at an angle to raise a divot. The oval slot looks to be added after the divoting. For a one off, I would try cutting a hardwood guide block you can feed a sharp punch through and smack it with a hammer. The punch doesn't need to be round, just have a round cutting face at the bottom were it will interact with the stock. An oval ejector pin and guide may be a good place to start, but I don't know how long it will last coldworking stainless.
    The operative word in the first post is “replicate.” If you look carefully at the three linked photos you can clearly see the divots don’t line up in a straight line and vary a lot in depth of cut. The original piece was made without a guide. He just picked up a smallish punch, ground a somewhat sharp face on it, (most likely he had a purpose-ground punch on his work bench just for this step) and did the texturing without a guide or probably even guidelines in less than a minute.

    There are many ways it could be done “better.”

    Denis

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Need an address to send the 5 bucks?
    Don't think so. First off, these sure look like forward controls. Harley never did anything like that in the old days, they hated choppers. Literally hated them. Second, I've seen a ton of old HD stuff and none of it is handmade junk banged out with a chisel. Much of it looks pretty crude by modern standards but it's not made by a guy standing at an anvil with a hammer.

    Pull out your serrated foot controls and let's see. And, as you point out, they were covered in rubber.

    These things look like a 1957 version of some Custom Chrome addon junk.

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    Here is a fine example of a 1941 Indian four rear brake pedal, genuine factory original, mind you this was and is the Duesenberg of motorcycles.
    img_1483.jpg
    img_1482.jpg
    img_1481.jpg
    Kind of makes them others look pretty good, but in the end the whole reason is to keep the rubber in place, I am glad they paid better attention when making most of the rest of the bike. Hardly worth much of a pissing match though as it seems we lost the OP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Here is a fine example of a 1941 Indian four rear brake pedal,....
    Exactly. And it looks nothing like the example in op's post.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Exactly. And it looks nothing like the example in op's post.
    Check this one out

    NOS HARLEY-DAVIDSON Brake pedal 42402-59 | eBay

    Or this

    NOS 1948-62 Harley Hummer Rear Brake Pedal Lever | eBay

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    A Hummer ! I stand corrected, but you have to remember, those were not actually Harleys In fact, were they made by HD or bought outside ? Did they get the DKW tooling, and that was how the Germs did it, with a hammer and chisel ? Most of the later small stuff came from Italy .... would have to look that up, but there's not going to be much about Hummers out there. Dealers wouldn't touch them, and no one I know would ever call them a "Harley."

    If it's off a Hummer, or a Topper, he shoulda said so in the beginning.

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    NOS panhead? Thats a real Harley? Your making me work real hard for that 5 bucks

    NOS HARLEY-DAVIDSON Brake Pedal Panhead Shovelhead 42402-59 | eBay

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    NOS panhead? Thats a real Harley? Your making me work real hard for that 5 bucks
    Aw jeeze .... I always knew pans were cheesy but didn't think they were that cheesy. Good thing I never bought one. Milwaukee bastards.

    (Kenny Augustine ported heads. One time someone talked him into doing a panhead. They were aluminum so I was kinda interested. He put it in the vice, did a quick swirl with the dumore, then gave it a puff to blow the chips out. They blew right back in his face. You shoulda seen the look Worst heads ever made, possibly.)

    PM a mailing address and I'll see if I can get someone to copy me up a fiver real quick

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