How do I indicate a threaded hole? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    Ok, I will look for some shoulder bolts.
    Headless. Easier to get your measuring goods onto. Or to trial-fit a mating flange. "etc::

    McMaster-Carr

    You didn't REALLY think you were the first person to ever NEED this, did you?

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    Precisely ground gauge, of course. Next is a tap that’s also got a shank ground concentric to head. Shoulder screws third choice. Do brush the threads before entering a gauge.

    wire-brush.jpg

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    If you are interested in accuracy, do not start with a stud. Start with round stock and machine both the thread and the protrusion to set the DI against in ONE set-up. I would make the threads long enough to install a nut and washer above the top surface. Lightly tighten that nut against the washer to pull the stud upwards. That will cause it to self center on the 60 degree threads giving you good centering on the threads.

    Or use a shoulder screw/bolt which has more precise geometry.



    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    I do have some tight fitting studs that I can machine and then screw in and indicate off, but I don't know just how close that would be. I am also looking for pretty close (I don't actually have a tolerance) as this is a bolt hole that will get studs installed.

    Beege: what part of MA are you in - I am very close to Chelmsford...

    Thanks

    Ray

  4. #24
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    Making my own would be the only solution as ~ a hour searching for a shoulder screw of any type that fit this hole came up empty.

    These are wheel flanges for a race car, I was trying to save a few $$$, but at some point the value of my time exceeds the cost of the part!

    Thanks all

    Ray

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    or, you could just use an indicator. You just need to adjust your Z as you go around to stay at the peak. Christ man, don't over think it.

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    IF you had the right size gauge pins, you could put one in that just slides in and the accuracy is going to be within the thou of wiggle. OR turn a pin that is a very light press/tight slip and use that. Of course the holes will vary, but the cost would be low to turn 3 pins required to locate the bolt circle

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    I may be over thinking it - I have a 130mm bolt circle that currently has studs which I wanted to make into dowels. The dowels have a .0025" clearanced hole that they fit in. Not much room for accumulated error over the 5 dowels

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    Race car........

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  10. #29
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    Yep,

    what I was thinking about doing is this:

    .jpg

    The 'standard' hub have studs to keep the wheels on. These are center-locks, so the studs are replaced with the gold colored pins you see, and if you look at the hub, you can see that the holes where the studs normally go are widened to accept the pins. These are used to locate the rim on the hub, and the wheel is held in place by a very large single nut, torqued to 350 lb-ft.

    Ray

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    What level of accuracy do you need? These I have used with a cmm, but just probing the tapped hole is nearly as close. TRU-POS™ - Tapped Hole Location Gages - INCH | Judge Tool & Gage

    For a mill I have used gage pins in the minor diameter, stripper bolts, cut down taps, and short screws. Try a couple and decide which you like best.

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    Based on what I saw here, I have a reasonable tight fighting stud with a flat machined edge and then use a good quality flange nut to pull the stud up.

    I will run through this exercise a couple of times and see how repeatable it is.

    The level of accuracy is probably +- .001"

    Ray

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  14. #32
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    Seems like it is critical that the radius from center is critical so wheel is dead true to center.

    With the shape of the object or peg in one hole one should be able to fixture the part such one pin is truly towards x or y via simple rotation and edge measurement.

    Go back center with co-ax indicator to dead nuts center then move x or y towards the hole exactly what the radius of the bolt circle is and machine the part.

    Do rest of bolt circle referenced from first.

    If the new hole is larger than old hole then a little rotational error may not matter.

    Sent from my SM-G781V using Tapatalk

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    Based on what I saw here, I have a reasonable tight fighting stud with a flat machined edge and then use a good quality flange nut to pull the stud up.

    I will run through this exercise a couple of times and see how repeatable it is.

    The level of accuracy is probably +- .001"

    Ray
    try with differing nut orientations . A ball and socket washer set would be ideal, but overkill ime. The threads will center themselves, if allowed!

    Of course one has to wonder about the location precision of the wheel holes. You may end up with reference marks.

    Actually, for a wheel application, I would never dowel more than three studs for location. and clamping pressure is more than enough for any security requirement.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    thread is 14mm x 1.5, fit is not that great. I put in what I thought was a tight fitting stud, and drove it down and was able to move it in the hole by hand +- .005.

    This may just be a problem to throw money at...
    Do you have a lathe to cut a over-sized screw to fit tight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    to pull the stud upwards. That will cause it to self center on the 60 degree threads giving you good centering on the threads.
    Threads don’t center.

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    ...and poke till it goes in...
    I like the way that sounds.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanola View Post
    Threads don’t center.
    Never used a threaded spindle? They center to microns, repeatably. I used swiss-made indicators to measure the runout on my threaded lathe spindle, there is less than 6 micron. And my lathe is nothing special, 75 yrs old.

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    Quote Originally Posted by pavt View Post
    Never used a threaded spindle? They center to microns, repeatably. I used swiss-made indicators to measure the runout on my threaded lathe spindle, there is less than 6 micron. And my lathe is nothing special, 75 yrs old.
    They have a shoulder. The threads don't center it.

    I have reverse engineered hundreds and hundreds of parts. Thousands of holes picked up with a DTI.

    IMO gage pins are better than any other method. The threads mean nothing really. You want to know where the hole is they drilled before they threaded it.

    Knowing what you're doing I don't understand why you even need to dial in on the hole locations. I would push two gauge pins into a pair of holes across from one another, put a parallel against the pins and sweep the flange in to an axis of travel. Then I'd lock it down and pick up the center of my flange. Then some real basic math would tell you where all the holes are supposed to be.

    They're not going to be perfectly where you think they are. They aren't that accurate.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    They have a shoulder. The threads don't center it.

    I have reverse engineered hundreds and hundreds of parts. Thousands of holes picked up with a DTI.

    IMO gage pins are better than any other method. The threads mean nothing really. You want to know where the hole is they drilled before they threaded it.

    Knowing what you're doing I don't understand why you even need to dial in on the hole locations. I would push two gauge pins into a pair of holes across from one another, put a parallel against the pins and sweep the flange in to an axis of travel. Then I'd lock it down and pick up the center of my flange. Then some real basic math would tell you where all the holes are supposed to be.

    They're not going to be perfectly where you think they are. They aren't that accurate.
    The shoulder always has clearance greater than measured chuck run out. This has been thoroughly hashed for as long as threaded spindles have been in use. Threads DO self center. They just do.

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  25. #40
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    I've been waiting for someone to mention threaded hole location gages.

    threaded hole locator - Google Search

    39uj49_as01.jpg


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