How do I indicate a threaded hole? - Page 4
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  1. #61
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    Likely stripper bolts cut off short would be a bargain gauge, might be good for .002 (?).

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    Post 29 has a picture of the hub with the components not assembled, assembled we have this:

    Attachment 332094

    The rim looks like this:

    Attachment 332095

    As opposed to the nonsense that kids have today, all the bolts on the rim are there because this rim is in 3 parts. The large hole fits over the large stud you can see in the previous picture and the is a nut that holds it all together and torqued to 350 lb-ft

    Ray

    You're going to all this trouble to put those ghetto wheels on a car? Hope this pays a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    No clue what a center lock capture system is, maybe I am missing something.
    It's like an el cheapo version of the old spline drive wheels that brit and eyetalian sports cars had, except instead of a splined hub, there's drive pins that fit holes in the wheels.

    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget
    You're going to all this trouble to put those ghetto wheels on a car? Hope this pays a lot.
    The hard part is going to be attaching the spinners

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    Oh gosh, I am not going to go through that one again. It has been talked to death both here and elsewhere.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanola View Post
    No, there’s always a shoulder and a countersurface in play.

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    It is not so hard to make one if you have a lathe.



    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    Those hole location gages are how I pick up holes on a CMM. I can turn the gage 180° or 90° and recheck and the location repeats, to within the capability of the CMM.
    In most real world practice, like on a car part, a good shoulder bolt is plenty good enough. One problem is that I can't find fine threaded shoulder bolts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    It is not so hard to make one if you have a lathe.
    For that matter, both NAPA and Ace Hardware have them, they call them "axle bolts", intended for various lawnmower parts. Usually coarse thread, but sometimes you find the fine threads in smaller sizes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tdmidget View Post
    You're going to all this trouble to put those ghetto wheels on a car? Hope this pays a lot.
    I hope you are kidding! There is a lot of real junk that is sold to kids out there, but this is a whole different game. One of these will cost as much as a set of the crap that is normally available - if you are interested in knowing a bit more you may want to look up BBS Motorsports. These are not meant to be driven on the street.

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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    Do the counterbores the pins fit in have some slop? Maybe allowing them to be locked in place by tightening the screw from the back? You sure of the .002" clearance on the pins? Maybe a math mistake translating from MM to inches? Seems too tight for dealing temperature changes on a 5 inch bolt/stud circle. The generous radii on the front of the pins will help getting the wheels started. Kind of doubt the original threaded holes were close enough to locate off them anyway. If the math and clearances are correct you would need a rather special mill with a tenths read out to locate the counnterbores the holes to less than .001 true location. Maybe some one with a jig bore could do it. Way easier to buy fitted hubs.
    Hey Fred, I was moving to fast in bad light when I made the initial measurements...

    The difference in diameter between pin and mating hole is .015".

    WRT to temperature expansion, I have measured temps ~400 degF on these parts, but bot surfaces expand. One is some form of high strength steel the other is a forged AL.
    At this point, Buying new ones is the preferred choice...

    Ray

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    It is not so hard to make one if you have a lathe.

    You are correct. Make me a couple sets in pairs from 8/36 to 3/4 in your spare time. When you are done, I'll send you my shipping information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mud View Post
    You are correct. Make me a couple sets in pairs from 8/36 to 3/4 in your spare time. When you are done, I'll send you my shipping information.
    They aren't that bad to make. I did at least two sets for Steve Arntz in the engine lathe, not a big deal. (Splines, not pin-drive.) He got the hot-girlfriend discount so I probably didn't make any money but it was worth it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    Hey Fred, I was moving to fast in bad light when I made the initial measurements...

    The difference in diameter between pin and mating hole is .015".

    WRT to temperature expansion, I have measured temps ~400 degF on these parts, but bot surfaces expand. One is some form of high strength steel the other is a forged AL.
    At this point, Buying new ones is the preferred choice...

    Ray
    I still think you would be better off buying new for $200. each, but the .015 clearance would make it possible to do this on a mill assuming the size of the existing bolt hole works with the through hole needed. 40 years ago I worked in a shop that did oilfield service. We made a number of bolt flanges and there are formulas that will give you the X and Y coordinates for various numbers of holes on any circle size. With a reasonable good mill and digital read out you could drill and counterbore each hole with the right formula. The only reason to do it would be to learn a new skill and you were as poor as a church mouse.
    Another option if you have a turret lathe would be to make screws to fit the existing tapped holes with an Allen drive to tighten them. Make the external profile of the outside the same as the purchased pins (less the counterbore depth). You could even put a lock nut on the inside if there is room to tighten them.

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    Threading in a tap would be a good ballpark gauge but best to keep very short as the drill press, mill, or other machines Tram would play a part in the inspection.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbahr View Post
    Post 29 has a picture of the hub with the components not assembled, assembled we have this:

    Attachment 332094

    The rim looks like this:

    Attachment 332095

    As opposed to the nonsense that kids have today, all the bolts on the rim are there because this rim is in 3 parts. The large hole fits over the large stud you can see in the previous picture and the is a nut that holds it all together and torqued to 350 lb-ft

    Ray
    the wheels look like cast magnesium bbs. have them on a car.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dian View Post
    the wheels look like cast magnesium bbs. have them on a car.
    Yep, race BBS. I was running the cast magnesium for a while, swapped them for forged AL, not as light but also not as brittle.

    I want to thank folks for their input, have decided to just spend the money. I may play with it in my 'free' time, but this may be easy for some folks, but so far, everything I have tried has not been repeatable.

    The pins are also press fit, so that needs to also be pretty good...

    Ray

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    Just a sanity check.
    What are the price of the 4 wheels and a 250 dollar cmm locator pin is too much money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Just a sanity check.
    What are the price of the 4 wheels and a 250 dollar cmm locator pin is too much money.
    Not sure I understand the question, but the hubs are ~$250 each

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    Having read this whole thread I can’t understand why you need to accurately pick up the threads when you know the bolt circle diameter. Pick up the center of the wheel. Move to the bolt circle and get as close to the center of one bolt hole along the bolt circle. Bore not drill that hole and use that as a reference for the others using the mill locations for bolt circle not the threads. Bore those too so if you are not exactly on the thread you will still get a perfect hole pattern.

    I actually did this in repairing a wheel hub on a fifty year old fork truck, about 25 years ago, on a mill with a Bandit controller. Just sit back and watch the blinkin lights and don’t touch nuthin!

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    Quote Originally Posted by garyhlucas View Post
    Having read this whole thread I can’t understand why you need to accurately pick up the threads when you know the bolt circle diameter. Pick up the center of the wheel. Move to the bolt circle and get as close to the center of one bolt hole along the bolt circle. Bore not drill that hole and use that as a reference for the others using the mill locations for bolt circle not the threads. Bore those too so if you are not exactly on the thread you will still get a perfect hole pattern.

    I actually did this in repairing a wheel hub on a fifty year old fork truck, about 25 years ago, on a mill with a Bandit controller. Just sit back and watch the blinkin lights and don’t touch nuthin!
    You said it better but that is what I was pointing out in post #71. All said I would buy new, the pins are a press fit scrap the fifth hole on the hub and all your work is for nothing.

  22. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by FredC View Post
    You said it better but that is what I was pointing out in post #71. All said I would buy new, the pins are a press fit scrap the fifth hole on the hub and all your work is for nothing.
    Fred, that is exactly what I decided. This is for a race car that sees 160mph at the track, no room for error.

    I did learn a few things though!

    Ray

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    Running at 160+ and wondering if the suppliers where afraid of spending a few dollars and wanted a cheap way out.
    It's not like you may die or any of that.
    Flip side is that I have done many not so great things in fab over the years, I should be dead. Pure Luck.

    Not sure how picky to get about this simple hole.
    Bob


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