How does a soldering station work
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  1. #1
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    I picked up a soldering station at a thrift store. a older weller with no temp control knob. I found no info on the internals so I would like to know how it works seems like a transformner inside the box. The tip is maybe spring loaded. so how does it sense temp and control the power to the iron.
    bill D.

  2. #2
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    I picked up a soldering station at a thrift store. a older weller with no temp control knob. I found no info on the internals so I would like to know how it works seems like a transformner inside the box. The tip is maybe spring loaded. so how does it sense temp and control the power to the iron.
    bill D.

  3. #3
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    I picked up a soldering station at a thrift store. a older weller with no temp control knob. I found no info on the internals so I would like to know how it works seems like a transformner inside the box. The tip is maybe spring loaded. so how does it sense temp and control the power to the iron.
    bill D.

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    Without knowing the exact model, i assume the transformer is for mains isolation.

    For an insight re temperature controlled iron http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/circ/wlc100.html

    Mark

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    Without knowing the exact model, i assume the transformer is for mains isolation.

    For an insight re temperature controlled iron http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/circ/wlc100.html

    Mark

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    Without knowing the exact model, i assume the transformer is for mains isolation.

    For an insight re temperature controlled iron http://www.uoguelph.ca/~antoon/circ/wlc100.html

    Mark

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    Usually they are 24v ac powered. In the tip on some of the wellers there is a temp device that sets the thermostat. I believe its all in the handle on those.

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    Usually they are 24v ac powered. In the tip on some of the wellers there is a temp device that sets the thermostat. I believe its all in the handle on those.

  9. #9
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    Usually they are 24v ac powered. In the tip on some of the wellers there is a temp device that sets the thermostat. I believe its all in the handle on those.

  10. #10
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    The tips are available in different heat ranges.
    They connect/disconnect in the barrel.

  11. #11
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    The tips are available in different heat ranges.
    They connect/disconnect in the barrel.

  12. #12
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    The tips are available in different heat ranges.
    They connect/disconnect in the barrel.

  13. #13
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    These rely on changes in the magnetic charactistics of the tips at the temperature set point.

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    These rely on changes in the magnetic charactistics of the tips at the temperature set point.

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    These rely on changes in the magnetic charactistics of the tips at the temperature set point.

  16. #16
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    The temperature is controlled by the tip. There's a magnet inside the tip the loses its magnetism at a set temperature. This shuts the heater off. Tips are available for 600, 700, and 800F. Search www.newark.com for "WTCTP".

    These are current model "production" soldering irons and are a very nice iron - for electronic soldering.

    The heater runs on 24V from the transformer.
    Edit: fat-finger-itis, it's WTCPT
    --
    Aaron

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    If it has the knurled ring at the base of
    the iron shaft, near the handle, do this:

    1) turn off the iron and wait for it to cool.

    [img]smile.gif[/img]

    2) unscrew the knurled ring and remove the
    ring and sleeve.

    3) remove the tip and look to see if it has a
    number at the base.

    If so the number will be 6, 7, or 8 which
    indicates 600, 700, or 800F operating temp.

    There's a microswitch in the handpiece which
    opeates via a magnet in the tip. The magnet
    cycles in and out of its curie temperature to
    control the power flow to the tip. Cute idea
    actually.

    "Weller Magnastat" is the trade name.

    Jim

  18. #18
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    The temperature is controlled by the tip. There's a magnet inside the tip the loses its magnetism at a set temperature. This shuts the heater off. Tips are available for 600, 700, and 800F. Search www.newark.com for "WTCTP".

    These are current model "production" soldering irons and are a very nice iron - for electronic soldering.

    The heater runs on 24V from the transformer.
    Edit: fat-finger-itis, it's WTCPT
    --
    Aaron

  19. #19
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    If it has the knurled ring at the base of
    the iron shaft, near the handle, do this:

    1) turn off the iron and wait for it to cool.

    [img]smile.gif[/img]

    2) unscrew the knurled ring and remove the
    ring and sleeve.

    3) remove the tip and look to see if it has a
    number at the base.

    If so the number will be 6, 7, or 8 which
    indicates 600, 700, or 800F operating temp.

    There's a microswitch in the handpiece which
    opeates via a magnet in the tip. The magnet
    cycles in and out of its curie temperature to
    control the power flow to the tip. Cute idea
    actually.

    "Weller Magnastat" is the trade name.

    Jim

  20. #20
    Join Date
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    The temperature is controlled by the tip. There's a magnet inside the tip the loses its magnetism at a set temperature. This shuts the heater off. Tips are available for 600, 700, and 800F. Search www.newark.com for "WTCTP".

    These are current model "production" soldering irons and are a very nice iron - for electronic soldering.

    The heater runs on 24V from the transformer.
    Edit: fat-finger-itis, it's WTCPT
    --
    Aaron


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