How hot to heat a bearing for press fit? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Loctite of the various concoctions is a band-aid on bearings. Yes I have overseen shipped many, many of parts that use this glue help on the OD bore.
    IMO other than worn, lopped or just plain bad it should never ever be used.
    May as well use JB weld in a small shop.
    Not a fan of above 150-180F which is lower temp than most here. Note that this is high end bearing run temp.
    If 400 needed will that internal race once cooled on the shaft be what it was made at anymore? Did you want to do this distortion and fit?
    Bob

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    Never had problems with alignment And a heati g up to 170 dgc makes it come out Often less of a hassle then try to press orpull it out Tolerance on apressfit for that dimensions are pretty tight too

    Peter
    It sounds like he's got an existing interference fit, are you suggesting he machine that away so as to use loctite?

    If its something just for yourself like this looks to be one can do whatever they please. But as general practice, say a machine tool repair, it would seem rather poor practice to meddle with the parts to change the bearing fits from interference to loctite as it will really mess up the next repairer, among other things

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    It sounds like he's got an existing interference fit, are you suggesting he machine that away so as to use loctite?

    If its something just for yourself like this looks to be one can do whatever they please. But as general practice, say a machine tool repair, it would seem rather poor practice to meddle with the parts to change the bearing fits from interference to loctite as it will really mess up the next repairer, among other things
    If it was a excisting interference fit I would press it on Heating and shrink fit such a small (bearing is too critical

    Peter

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Loctite of the various concoctions is a band-aid on bearings. Yes I have overseen shipped many, many of parts that use this glue help on the OD bore.
    IMO other than worn, lopped or just plain bad it should never ever be used.
    May as well use JB weld in a small shop.
    Not a fan of above 150-180F which is lower temp than most here. Note that this is high end bearing run temp.
    If 400 needed will that internal race once cooled on the shaft be what it was made at anymore? Did you want to do this distortion and fit?
    Bob
    Quote Originally Posted by Mcgyver View Post
    It sounds like he's got an existing interference fit, are you suggesting he machine that away so as to use loctite?

    If its something just for yourself like this looks to be one can do whatever they please. But as general practice, say a machine tool repair, it would seem rather poor practice to meddle with the parts to change the bearing fits from interference to loctite as it will really mess up the next repairer, among other things
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    If it was a excisting interference fit I would press it on Heating and shrink fit such a small (bearing is too critical

    Peter


    Thanks guys, I need the press for a clutch bearing to work properly, see post #8.

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    I put it in a ziploc bag in a coffee cup and let the keurig fill the cup with hot water.

    If you don't have keurig you can microwave it, while in water.

    I like heating bearings in water because the maximum temperature is limited and the bearing stays hot until you are ready to use it.

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  7. #26
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    I put the bearing in the oven at 200F and the shaft in the freezer. Had 'er all lined up, hit the end of the shaft with the cold spray just before assembly and it went right together with a 0.0007" or so press.

    Here's that cold spray, says it chills to -60F:

    Cooling Spray for Electronics - MG Chemicals

    Thanks guys.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    If it was a excisting interference fit I would press it on Heating and shrink fit such a small (bearing is too critical

    Peter
    Take a look at the crankshaft bearings on a 2-stroke bike sometimes. The Yamaha manual tells you to heat up the bearing in order to be able to install it. I imagine the Suzuki and Honda are similar. The procedure is similar when putting the engine cases together. Been there, done that for a buddy at work who rides.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Keeley View Post
    Where was the BOOM!?

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    The rewind shop I worked at had 2 induction heaters, we used the yellow pen 112f to heat our bearings to slip onto to rotor bearing races

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    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    Where was the BOOM!?
    Just coming back on the throttle at 4:42.

    Actually the motor was OK, the one-way bearing didn't let go and it unscrewed the coupling on the motor shoving the shaft forward.

    Here's what's left of a collar and the one-way bearing:


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  13. #31
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    I use a aluminum cone placed on top of a electric burner. Place bearing on center of cone and let it heat up. Use a temperature IR sensor if you need to.

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    Set up to press and forget the heat. You are never going to heat fit a 17mm bearing. Heating to 250° F is only going to give you 0.001" expansion if the shaft is at 0° F. There's not enough expansion and if it touches anywhere, it'll lock up, instantly. Heat fitting works well on larger bearings (1.5" or more and the bigger the bearing, the better it works.

    A tip I picked up here decades ago was "Five ball 64", five zeros in front of 64. That means expansion or contraction of 0.0000064" per inch of diameter, per degree F for steel. Makes decisions like this really fast and easy.

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    Your one way bearing has a key in the bore
    So torque is not transmitted through the press fit
    If you install a new one way bearing be sure the key fits not to tight
    Otherwise the innerrace can split at the key
    I have had that once


    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    Your one way bearing has a key in the bore
    So torque is not transmitted through the press fit
    If you install a new one way bearing be sure the key fits not to tight
    Otherwise the innerrace can split at the key
    I have had that once


    Peter
    Ya, that's what I thought too but I've been having problems with the bearing slipping so did a little reading and found they actually want a fairly tight press to take up internal clearance in the bearing.

    It's an FKNN6203, if you look closely at the diagram the shaft calls for an n6 fit which is a 12-23 microns press.

    http://www.drivelineinc.com/files/pr...200-series.pdf

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    Slipping ???
    Did the key shear off ??
    Or is the OD slipping ??

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    Slipping ???
    Did the key shear off ??
    Or is the OD slipping ??

    Peter

    The sprags themselves in the one-way clutch bearing. I/D and O/D are fixed with keys. Seems single cylinder two strokes are the worst for it, the engineer's call it "torsional vibration".


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    Do you have a additional bearing to support the clutch The FKNN 6203 is suited for 3700 RPM
    I am sure your 2 stroke goes much faster

    Peter

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    Quote Originally Posted by Peter from Holland View Post
    Do you have a additional bearing to support the clutch The FKNN 6203 is suited for 3700 RPM
    I am sure your 2 stroke goes much faster

    Peter
    Yup, the bearing is supported on both sides.

    I'm definitely "outside the envelope" on this one. I'm going to try a needle type one-way bearing next and then try to dampen the vibration with a Lovejoy type coupling.

    If those don't work I'm thinking about making a torque converter / mechanical diode:



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    IIRC there is another type of one way bearing where instead of sprags riding between round races the races are formed to have a bunch of tapers, so as regular needles roll into them they bind, and as they roll out they slip. I think just angled flats ground into a needle bearing race is plenty to make one.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Strostkovy View Post
    IIRC there is another type of one way bearing where instead of sprags riding between round races the races are formed to have a bunch of tapers, so as regular needles roll into them they bind, and as they roll out they slip. I think just angled flats ground into a needle bearing race is plenty to make one.

    You don't say, lol.





    I talked to their engineer in the UK who said their "trapped roller" type clutches were "slightly" more tolerant of torsional vibration than the sprag types.

    I got a quote for one, price isn't too bad but 4-6 weeks delivery. For now I'm gonna try a one-way needle clutch.




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