How are Scotch Brite pads cut?
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    Default How are Scotch Brite pads cut?

    I have an idea for a tool that would use scotch brite type pads in a particular shape. I wonder how they are cut in production as I would think any shearing type tool would get dull quickly. Could they be cut with water jet? Anybody have any ideas?

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    So, not being a smart aleck at all, I went to youtube and typed in "Scotchbrite pad cutting" and got A LOT of results. Everything from fancy automated machines to guys cutting them with bandsaws out of huge sheets. Give it a look, maybe something you see will fit your needs?

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    I don't know why I didn't think of that - I use youtube for lots of stuff! I guess the folks here came to mind first:-)

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    I keep a pair of Harbor Freight scissors in the shop that are marked and reserved just for scotch brite type pads. At $0.99 each or often free with a coupon they're cheap enough to toss when needed but amazingly they last quite a while.

    I often make buffing wheels by cutting octagons and then mounting layers with the points staggered. I dress them round with an old hacksaw blade before use.

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    I also just use a cheap pair of scissors.

    Sharpening scissors is easy.

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    Trauma shears. Serrated edge scissors and dirt cheap. If I don’t have a pair, I tear the sheets.

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    I don't have an idea about that.

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    We used to do some maintenance work for a shop that cut sanding disks and scotch brite . They used what they called dies. The die was actually made of wood and it had a groove cut into the wood and a sharpened steel ring was mounted in this groove. I believe there were 6 rings in 1 board. Then a press pushed on the back of the wood to cut the disks. I never saw what backed up the disks on the other side.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cuttergrinder View Post
    We used to do some maintenance work for a shop that cut sanding disks and scotch brite . They used what they called dies. The die was actually made of wood and it had a groove cut into the wood and a sharpened steel ring was mounted in this groove. I believe there were 6 rings in 1 board. Then a press pushed on the back of the wood to cut the disks. I never saw what backed up the disks on the other side.
    "Steel rule die" or "dinking die"

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scottl View Post
    I keep a pair of Harbor Freight scissors in the shop that are marked and reserved just for scotch brite type pads. At $0.99 each or often free with a coupon they're cheap enough to toss when needed but amazingly they last quite a while.

    I often make buffing wheels by cutting octagons and then mounting layers with the points staggered. I dress them round with an old hacksaw blade before use.
    You can buy them that way if you don't want to spend time hacking something together.

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    I used to die cut scotch brite. Dies seemed to self sharpen. Steel rule dies are cheap. Also die cut sand paper from the back side

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    Considering the shape(s) I would have to make, steel rule dies may be the best method. Scissors are definitely out and bandsaw would be to slow. Interesting that steel rule dies are "self sharpening" - I would think they would dull quickly.

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    Last time I bought steel rule dies, they cost a buck an inch. I think the guy made them off jpegs, but it might have been dxfs. He made the plate out of acrylic rather than wood, so the operator could see where to place the die.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    I also just use a cheap pair of scissors.
    While wearing a "pair" of pants, yes ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    While wearing a "pair" of pants, yes ?
    Just like you "Cut down the tree" and then "Cut up the fire wood" eh ?

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    Hey, that's the common usage. I didn't start it.

    Two scise, joined with a screw makes a pair of scissors.

    Strange thing is, I thought I just made that word up. But the spell checker accepted it as legit. Go figure. Perhaps I guessed correctly.



    Quote Originally Posted by Milacron View Post
    While wearing a "pair" of pants, yes ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Hey, that's the common usage. I didn't start it.
    I know... just thought that term silly for something that always has two components. I probably say it as well. Even sillier term for pants unless the first trousers invented covered only one leg.

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    We did alot of die cutting of many different materials using steel rule dies. We had a small quantity of scotch brite parts needed for our own use that we die cut. It probably was only a couple of hundred total over a few years. The die did fine for that many, where some people didnt think it would cut at all. I did not want to leave the impression that I was cutting hundreds of thousands of pieces. However like I said, it worked just fine and might of continued to do so.
    You can tell the die maker what kind of material you are cutting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by surplusjohn View Post
    You can tell the die maker what kind of material you are cutting.
    Heck, you can buy the pre-sharpened die strip for reasonable money, and with a little patience make your own slotted bases for the strip to be inserted. A little testing (presuming you have a press and some backing plates) and you've got a yes or no on the process.

    Just make sure you're stocked-up with Band-Aids...

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    What ? No suggestion involving "Lazer Beams" ?????


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