How would YOU make this tiny part?
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  1. #1
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    Default How would YOU make this tiny part?

    Hi All:
    So I have 48 of these little PITA parts to make.
    The thread is M1.6 x 0.35
    The head is 0.1875" diameter and 0.030" thick.
    How would you do it?

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails dscn5422.jpg   dscn5421.jpg  

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    Looks like a disc-shaped nut is screwed onto the threaded shaft. Bu I can't tell if the whole part is a screw with a head, or a longer shaft with a flange near the end and threads beyond

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    Can not tell if your part is an assembly of 2 parts or one is a gauge and the other is the part.

    We have a small nut with 3-56 threads that is .080 long. We mill the threads so as not to deal with tapping such a short part.
    Last edited by FredC; 11-19-2021 at 11:35 PM.

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    12mm Swiss but it’s gonna be mad difficult to get the vanish thread to run into the head like that without leaving a mark on the face. Is thread relief an option?

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    The picture is unclear and does not define the finished part. But to answer the question, I would use my Levin 10 mm lathe with the lever cross slide and turret.
    LevinLathe.com: PRECISION TURRET LATHES

    Or a Hardinge ESM59 or DSM59 would do the job.

    Larry

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    I would take it to this guy I know of in Vancouover who does little stuff

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    I'd contract it out to implmex.


    [Initiates recursive loop, end of Universe ensues]

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    If you are not familiar with small precision work pieces, you have 2 choices, learn the skill. Or no quote.

    I'm not going to help you make this piece on this site, you will have to learn it on your own.

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    Quote Originally Posted by otrlt View Post
    If you are not familiar with small precision work pieces, you have 2 choices, learn the skill. Or no quote.

    I'm not going to help you make this piece on this site, you will have to learn it on your own.
    Why, it's god's gift to manufacturing, deaning to contact our miserable little community. Huzzah, the Otrit has spoken!

    If you were any more useless, you'd be a virus.

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    To me it looks like a disc with a set screw threaded thru it

    these are 2-56 with a .125 x .03 head We make them 260 brass and 303 stainless but the thread stops .012 or so before the head, that was about as close as I could get.
    img_3035.jpg
    img_3028-1-.jpg
    img_3119.jpg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Why, it's god's gift to manufacturing, deaning to contact our miserable little community. Huzzah, the Otrit has spoken!

    If you were any more useless, you'd be a virus.
    Yes Milind,
    Precision work is my business, and I don't give free advice. The work pieces shown would never pass inspection, the surface finish is "China Grade".

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    Quote Originally Posted by otrlt View Post
    Yes Milind,
    Precision work is my business, and I don't give free advice. The work pieces shown would never pass inspection, the surface finish is "China Grade".
    Why would it be you would go on a forum filled with people looking for advise, click on a link titled "How would YOU make this tiny part?" only to offer up shit like "I'm not going to help you make this piece on this site, you will have to learn it on your own."??

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    I would recommend turning the part

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    Looked at the photos again. Looks like a mock up of something you need to make as one piece. Photo 2 is more or less finished since you probably do not have a hole through your finger. I have single point threaded pretty close to a shoulder but I think I could get closer with a thread mill. Might have to modify the cutter to get very close to the shoulder. I have run the spindle on my Hardinge GT as slow as 15 RPMs with out it bucking. Not sure how slow you can smoothly turn your lathe spindle.

    If you can not turn the lathe spindle slow enough to mill the threads could be done as a second op on a mill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Why would it be you would go on a forum filled with people looking for advise, click on a link titled "How would YOU make this tiny part?" only to offer up shit like "I'm not going to help you make this piece on this site, you will have to learn it on your own."??
    The funny (not ha-ha) bit is that implmex has doubtless done more fine, accurate work than otrit has ever dreamed of.

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  20. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by kustomizer View Post
    Why would it be you would go on a forum filled with people looking for advise, click on a link titled "How would YOU make this tiny part?" only to offer up shit like "I'm not going to help you make this piece on this site, you will have to learn it on your own."??
    Because I can.

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    Quote Originally Posted by otrlt View Post
    Because I can.
    That's the same answer a toddler gives when asked why he smeared his poo on the bathroom walls.

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    Turn thread to OD
    Start a die, run in as deep as possible
    Reverse the die to go tight
    Or
    2 part it, thread then disk, silver solder in place
    Or
    Thread mill, which is what it looks like, however I’d have to sell my liver to buy a Kearn microtechnic, and the mrs too I’d reckon then I too could be part of the kern family, wonder if they do HIre purchase, I’d heard it grows back
    ( the liver not the mrs)
    Mark

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    Quote Originally Posted by boslab View Post
    I’d heard it grows back
    ( the liver not the mrs)
    I don't think so. Otherwise we'd still have Steve Jobs to kick around ...

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    Is that two parts, a screw and a disc, and if a screw, does it have any drive-feature.

    If it's one-piece, I'd get a stock screw (McMaster-Carr) chuck the treads in a collet, and turn the head down to the disc shape. If you need a "custom length", get a longer screw, chuck the threads in a collet, and cut them off while rotating with an toolpost-mounted rotary tool abrasive disc (this does not damage the threads, and leaves a very small tit on the end that one swipe on a stone removes).

    If it's two pieces, the threaded post can be cut off from stock screws as above.

    The examples below may not be perfectly pertinent, but may provide some food-for-thought:

    I've threaded various m1.4 and other small SS screws/posts on the hardinge; the below picture with the nuts are m1.4x.3 posts turned single-point threaded on SS wire stock; it takes an EXTREMELY sharp, polished hss tool, stock chucked in a collet with very little stickout, and small cut depth (IIRC I was taking 3-4 passes in SS stock)--a real PITA. So if you can use a stock screw, or part of a stock screw for the treaded material, you're way ahead of the game. I always cut things off using the toolpost mounted rotary tool with the part rotating(proxxon, dremel or similar)cutoff wheel (dremel type, .02 thick). This also allows cutting off to a precise length (using the lathe dials)..

    The picture with the round caps are m1.4 also, with a small post turned on the end, onto which the delrin caps are pressed.
    a)got long SS m1.4 ss screws from mcmaster
    b)cut the head off (using lathe and rotary tool and abrasive disc); this provided the "threaded stock".
    c)chuck threaded stock in collet in Hardinge and turn down post (the posts were turned down to .031 +/-.0005 dia) (requires extremely sharp HSS tool)
    d)flip the stock around in the collet and turn a post on the second end (this produces two parts from each piece of threaded stock)
    e)take to lathe with roatary-tool cutooff disc, collet (or chuck), and cut parts to length (had to devise a felt-lined trap to keep from losing a high percentage of the parts from flying away).
    f)still had to run the bastards thru a die (chucking the post in a pin vise) to take the very small burr off the shoulder of the treads on the post-end; the end cut off with the abrasive disk threads fine with no touchup.

    If it's a threaded disc, that's easy-peasy (if not tedious) on the hardinge, tap the round stock, face end, cut-off (lap on paper or stone cut-off face); if the cutoff face is more critical, i'd put them in and emergency collet and face that side also.

    Never had much luck threading such things in SS with dies, but I'd love to be educated on how, and specifically what dies work.



    stubby-post-fastener.jpg

    screws-n-nuts1.jpg

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