Hungary Lathe any good?
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  1. #1
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    Default Hungary Lathe any good?

    I have never heard of a Szerszamgepiparimuvek nor could I even begin to pronounce it. I could much information on the internet. I am just wondering if anyone has had any experience with this manufacture and if it is worth going to look at. We need a bigger lathe and it is only a few hours away. Since we are in Montana that doesn't happen very often. I would be grateful of any knowledge you can throw my way.

    00b0b_jkld29aw8do_600x450.jpg00u0u_5opae2s6x33_600x450.jpg

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    i'm sure if you feed it some iron it'll be ok.

    All kidding aside, it looks like its in great shape, parts my be difficult to find. If it's in good condition and you don't wreck it, it's very likely you won't need to replace parts. If anything it'll probably pay for itself and more before needing any repairs. By that time you could just upgrade to something else.

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    I've never worked on one of those but in my experience most Eastern European machine tools are pretty decent machines. The spares issue needs investigating for piece of mind.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    Is there a carriage and a tailstock. Don't see any in the image.

    Wait! I do see a bit of a square tool post at the extreme right. Must be a long bed. What I see looks competently made. Former Eastern Bloc countries had fine industrial resources. The Cold War Soviet emphasis was on production and their trade schools and universities turned tou millions of capable trades people and engineers. The result was a good industrial base. Hungary did their share.

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    There is both and I just heard back, they want 15k for it.

    00r0r_7vzjat3tjax_600x450.jpg

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    $15k for a mid sized lathe of some years service for which parts are impossible? I'd try for that too. Nice looking machine but what happens if the QC tumbler or the half nut goes south? Offer him $250 a ton and negotiate from there..

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    A friend bought a large ex soviet manual lathe, similar.
    Its a great piece of equipment - and built just like the brick shithouse.

    I worked on russian built Mig21bis fighters, in the Finnish air force technical core.
    They were built about the same.
    Looks were like something you would hammer together with a sledge - but very reliable, and could spend a night out in -20C, and then fly in 30 secs.
    A british built Hawk yet trainer had to have every single electrical connection blowdried, after tha same arctic night test.

    In machine tools mass=better.
    Heavier is always better.

    Replacing anything electrical with modern stuff is a cheap, easy exercise.
    15k is still too much, imho.
    The other one was about 5000 kg (12000 lbs) and for about 5k€, iirc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    $15k for a mid sized lathe of some years service for which parts are impossible? I'd try for that too. Nice looking machine but what happens if the QC tumbler or the half nut goes south? Offer him $250 a ton and negotiate from there..
    $15000/$250 per ton = 60 tons

    Probably the Hungarian lathe weighs much less than 60 tons, so there would have to be quite a lot of negotiating to get to a sale.

    Larry

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    Fun Fact: When "Szerszamgepiparimuvek" is pronounced correctly, the proper response is "God bless you!"

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    I noticed on the tag it reads 380 [email protected] 50 cycles. Most current in the US is 60 cycles. You'll have to take that into consideration when making an offer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by projectnut View Post
    I noticed on the tag it reads 380 [email protected] 50 cycles. Most current in the US is 60 cycles. You'll have to take that into consideration when making an offer.
    I saw that as well. I asked if they had a transformer or how they are running it but I haven't heard back.

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    Have one much smaller and newer model at work, afaik the company exist no more and i could not find any info on the net.
    The lathe is quiet robust, although very noisy and the bed ways is on the soft side.
    The internal gear train, head stock seems decent.

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    Quote Originally Posted by L Vanice View Post
    $15000/$250 per ton = 60 tons

    Probably the Hungarian lathe weighs much less than 60 tons, so there would have to be quite a lot of negotiating to get to a sale.

    Larry
    I concur, it is to much. I will wait until I get all the information on it and offer a significantly lower price or wait for them to re-list it a couple months.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sundewzer View Post
    I saw that as well. I asked if they had a transformer or how they are running it but I haven't heard back.
    As long as it is just a motor you are running, you can use 50hz motors on 60 hz power. It will just run a little faster than the labels advertise.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo83 View Post
    As long as it is just a motor you are running, you can use 50hz motors on 60 hz power. It will just run a little faster than the labels advertise.
    Yes, most three phase motors running at 380/3/50 are perfectly happy at 480/3/60 (we do the opposite, using 480/3/60 motors overseas at 380/3/50). The speeds on the 50 hertz machine will run 60/50 (x 1.2) faster on 60 hertz. The 60 hertz machine will run 5/6 (x 0.83) slower on 50 hertz. We're running positive displacement pumps, so the HP requirement goes up or down with the frequency. On 60 hertz, your 50 hertz machine may feel underpowered, but then you can use a VFD and drop the speed down to nameplated 50 hertz anyway...

    John Friend
    Sun Valley, CA

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    19.5 kw is equal to roughly 26 hp. I doubt he will miss out on power.

    The issue I see is this lathe is using a overseas power source and dollars to doughnuts it is a true metric machine.

    If it does both metric and standard, he will have to learn the work around the threading gauge. chances are it will be worthless on threading standard threads.

    Best keep lead screw engauged on standard threads like i do with metrics on both our lathes when turning metric threads.

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    I can't see too well in the picture, but it looks to me that the compound doesn't swivel. Is that correct?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Onepass View Post
    I can't see too well in the picture, but it looks to me that the compound doesn't swivel. Is that correct?
    if you have three knobs on an apron of a lathe, it will move in three directions.


    Kinda wished i had it for the simplicity of large metric threads.


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