Hydraulic rods attaching the eye, what your method
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  1. #1
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    Default Hydraulic rods attaching the eye, what your method

    I have been machining different chrome bar rods at work.
    The photo below is some 7/8” K1045 chrome bar, I planning to attach it together with a M5 screw by drilling a blind hole in both the eye and the rod end.
    img_8954.jpg

    These are some 1 ½” 4140 chrome bars attached to a 2” boss. I screwed them together using a M6 thread.
    The rods turned out well, there was a small amount of pull from the welding with the eye moving off center.
    img_8443.jpg
    img_8442.jpg
    The reason I’m showing these photos, I’m wondering what are other people’s methods of attaching the eyes when welding?

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    Using the threads to hold the parts for welding I presume? Should work well. I do enough of them that I made a jig to hold a rod and eye in position without bothering with the tapping.

    Ed.

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    How about spot facing a flat on the eye when you drill the hole. The fixture sounds like a good idea too. I'm sure you know to spot tack the 4 corners before welding the entire eye....hate to insult your intelligence by saying that....lol

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    Most rods I work on have a stub post that goes into hole in eye along with a flat. Clamp it tight and weld away.

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    A puny little thread isn't going to hold much of anything 'in position' because of the tremendous pulling force of the welded metal shrinking. A stub post is highly recommended.

    That being said, I don't always do that. I always prep the end of the shaft with a bevel so I can get a good distance in to lay a good bead or 3 on each side before I finish up with a pass all the way around.

    I set up by laying and clamping the chrome shaft in a pair of V blocks (any sort of crude blocks meant for welding with), keeping the shaft in the cardboard sleeve so it doesn't arc to the chrome. Lay the eye in another V block across the end, and clamp that one to the welding table and measure it up for height and cross setting. I crank up the MIG (to achieve spray-transfer mode) and lay a hot bead all the way across the bevel prep. Turn the thing over and lay a hot bead on the opposite side. Then, since I have a rotary fixture with a lathe chuck on it, I chuck the thing in there and finish off the welding, thus making it easier to lay some nice beads all around without stopping. Protect the chrome with brass shimstock near the weld area.

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    If the eye is reusable, I cut the old shaft 1/2 diam. length or more from the eye. Chuck the eye in 4 jaw, turn down stub to 1/2 diam., thread (12tpi). Face, bore and thread the new shaft to fit the eye. Anti-splater on the chrome to protect from the weld. In a pinch I've used masking tape but it's hard to polish off.

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    If you have not seen it check out this guy's youtube channel - tons of heavy equipment repair like you are asking about.

    Cutting Edge Engineering Australia

    Cutting Edge Engineering Australia - YouTube

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    I ended up going with the threads again, as the shafts were already complete.
    The result came up nice.
    Thanks for every ones positive feedback.
    img_8955.jpg

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    I'm interested to see other peoples photos of their techniques on attaching the eyes.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lanza View Post
    I'm interested to see other peoples photos of their techniques on attaching the eyes.
    Did it break?

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    A guy got some cheap surplus rams from Case,and got me to shorten them to fit his Case skidsteer......unfortunately,the shafts were about 1/4" larger diameter than stock,thought to be unimportant......when the bucket was full tip ,the thicker rods fouled the lifter arms ,and broke the new rods ........ the rods bent and snapped in the clean rod,the weld to the eye held solid ,despite being considerably bent.....So have no concern of the welded on ends being weak,they are stronger than the chrome rod.

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    I drill a hole in both pieces and use a set screw. Usually 3/8", but sometimes 1/2" on bigger rods. Chamfer rod end for better weld. Spin it on and hold the bar tight. Hit the eye with a hammer to tighten. Then weld. I have never had one go cockeyed
    ..........or break.

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    I would vee the rod end down about 1/2 inch to make more room for the welds and pre and post heat the welds. If the eye breaks the weld you meet lawyers...Phil

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    Here are some more photos of chrome shafts I made from K1045. I spot faced a flat on the side of the eye with a 2 flute endmill. Then drilled and tapped a small holes in the eye to attach to the shaft. There was quite a bit of extra work in this, but the results were good. The only small problem I had was the 2 flute endmill was not flat bottoming, something to work on for next time.

    img_9190.jpgimg_9189.jpg

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    I’d buy rod eyes myself, threaded things
    Mark


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