I need a vise repaired/refurbed
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  1. #1
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    Default I need a vise repaired/refurbed

    Anyone have any interest in repairing or refurbishing my vise?

    img_8797c.jpg

    img_8795c.jpgimg_8791c.jpg

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    I am retired. But for what I would charge you to refurbish that one, you could buy 2, 3, or even 4 new ones.

    Either do it yourself or, as Ramsey said, toss it and buy a new one.

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  4. #3
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    Where are you in Indiana? I might could help out to be neighborly and such if it means something to you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Where are you in Indiana? I might could help out to be neighborly and such if it means something to you.
    It was my grandpa's vise and I couldn't find one that had his name etched in it from Harbor Freight.

    I'm in central Indiana.

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    That vise looks as if your granddad may have built it. I’m quite sentimental about such things. I suggest fixing the screw so the handle goes back on as was intended and leave the rest of his work alone. Take care of it and use it, remember him when you do. That’s my $.02

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    Email sent..........Bob

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    Quote Originally Posted by bhigdog View Post
    Email sent..........Bob
    no email received

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    What is your goal in "repairing and refurbishing?" Do you plan to use the vise? Make it look better than new? Put it on display?

    Denis

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    Yeah, a scope of work would be good. Want it looking like new or just cleaned up and a new screw?

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    What is your goal in "repairing and refurbishing?" Do you plan to use the vise? Make it look better than new? Put it on display?

    Denis
    My intent is to use it as a vise. Cleaned up for display purposes is not what I'm trying to achieve.

    I understand the sentiment of putting it up for display, but we both used the vise together on projects. If it was a delicate tool such as one with many small moving parts that would wear over time, I would agree on displaying it, but since it's a vise, I would think having it repaired should lend many years of use.

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    Quote Originally Posted by indychuck View Post
    My intent is to use it as a vise. Cleaned up for display purposes is not what I'm trying to achieve.

    I understand the sentiment of putting it up for display, but we both used the vise together on projects. If it was a delicate tool such as one with many small moving parts that would wear over time, I would agree on displaying it, but since it's a vise, I would think having it repaired should lend many years of use.
    OK, knowing the motivation and desired end result helps focus "restoration" efforts. You want to return it to its original usability without much regard for shining it up.

    1) I would guess the thread damage to the screw is mostly from the set screw in the cast handle slipping and wearing away the thread.

    2) Maybe the threaded bushing in the body of the vise is stripped and that is the reason for the nuts on the screw or maybe the bushing was never threaded and the handwheel was simply a means of rapidly adjusting the position of the vise jaw and the inboard nut was used to provide the real holding power of the vise. I favor that explanation as it looks like the bushing is so thin and does not appear to have an inboard step to prevent its being forced out of the body. If the bushing is a simple sleeve, the repair is simplified.

    3) Presumably the screw is captured in the moving vise jaw by some sort of pin(s) or a set screw that rides in a groove in the head of the screw.

    If the above assumptions are correct, all you really need is to remove the worn out screw , machine in a retaining groove, and replace it. Then you need to use a roll pin to fix the handwheel onto the screw so that it will not slip in the future and repeat the damage that occurred.

    If the bushing is threaded, then it needs to be bored out and replacement made. Not all that difficult. Ideally that replacement would be made from a a hardenable steel like O1, A2, or at least 4140PH. Any of those steels are commonly available and all can be hardened and tempered with a simple MAPP gas torch though the 4140PH is moderately hard as supplied. Making a hardened threaded bushing will greatly extend its working life.

    It also looks like the vise will fit in a small flat rate USPS box---shipping it to someone should be pretty cheap.

    Denis

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    If it's beyond your ability I'd be happy to help. PM me if you need me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    OK, knowing the motivation and desired end result helps focus "restoration" efforts. You want to return it to its original usability without much regard for shining it up.

    1) I would guess the thread damage to the screw is mostly from the set screw in the cast handle slipping and wearing away the thread.

    2) Maybe the threaded bushing in the body of the vise is stripped and that is the reason for the nuts on the screw or maybe the bushing was never threaded and the handwheel was simply a means of rapidly adjusting the position of the vise jaw and the inboard nut was used to provide the real holding power of the vise. I favor that explanation as it looks like the bushing is so thin and does not appear to have an inboard step to prevent its being forced out of the body. If the bushing is a simple sleeve, the repair is simplified.

    3) Presumably the screw is captured in the moving vise jaw by some sort of pin(s) or a set screw that rides in a groove in the head of the screw.

    If the above assumptions are correct, all you really need is to remove the worn out screw , machine in a retaining groove, and replace it. Then you need to use a roll pin to fix the handwheel onto the screw so that it will not slip in the future and repeat the damage that occurred.

    If the bushing is threaded, then it needs to be bored out and replacement made. Not all that difficult. Ideally that replacement would be made from a a hardenable steel like O1, A2, or at least 4140PH. Any of those steels are commonly available and all can be hardened and tempered with a simple MAPP gas torch though the 4140PH is moderately hard as supplied. Making a hardened threaded bushing will greatly extend its working life.

    It also looks like the vise will fit in a small flat rate USPS box---shipping it to someone should be pretty cheap.

    Denis
    Denis, very helpful indeed. I'll send your detailed write up to the individual commissioned to restore. I'll PM eKretz to ask his availability.

    Many thanks again!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by dgfoster View Post
    1) I would guess the thread damage to the screw is mostly from the set screw in the cast handle slipping and wearing away the thread.

    2) Maybe the threaded bushing in the body of the vise is stripped and that is the reason for the nuts on the screw or maybe the bushing was never threaded and the handwheel was simply a means of rapidly adjusting the position of the vise jaw and the inboard nut was used to provide the real holding power of the vise. I favor that explanation as it looks like the bushing is so thin and does not appear to have an inboard step to prevent its being forced out of the body. If the bushing is a simple sleeve, the repair is simplified.

    3) Presumably the screw is captured in the moving vise jaw by some sort of pin(s) or a set screw that rides in a groove in the head of the screw.

    If the above assumptions are correct, all you really need is to remove the worn out screw , machine in a retaining groove, and replace it. Then you need to use a roll pin to fix the handwheel onto the screw so that it will not slip in the future and repeat the damage that occurred.

    If the bushing is threaded, then it needs to be bored out and replacement made. Not all that difficult. Ideally that replacement would be made from a a hardenable steel like O1, A2, or at least 4140PH. Any of those steels are commonly available and all can be hardened and tempered with a simple MAPP gas torch though the 4140PH is moderately hard as supplied. Making a hardened threaded bushing will greatly extend its working life.

    It also looks like the vise will fit in a small flat rate USPS box---shipping it to someone should be pretty cheap.

    Denis
    ALL of this.. is why I class it a a short and simple DIY project yah can do with common parts from a "Big Box" special fastener cabinet if yah don't already have a few bits and pieces under yer own roof.

    It just ain't complicated unless you want to MAKE it appear to be "complicated".


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