I want to make a handle from rectangular tubing where one pc fits into another.
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    Default I want to make a handle from rectangular tubing where one pc fits into another.

    As the title explains, I have a 3/4 x 1 1/2 14 ga tube and I want to make a two pc handle for shipping purposes. I want to squeeze or compress the end of the tube so that it fits into the other handle to create a longer handle. Is the a machine or something that can compress about 6-8 inches so that one end would fit snugly into the other?
    Thanks for any ideas.
    Kyle

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    Why not just use two sizes of tube that nest together?
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by ksp View Post
    As the title explains, I have a 3/4 x 1 1/2 14 ga tube and I want to make a two pc handle for shipping purposes. I want to squeeze or compress the end of the tube so that it fits into the other handle to create a longer handle. Is the a machine or something that can compress about 6-8 inches so that one end would fit snugly into the other?
    Thanks for any ideas.
    Kyle
    Try finn power:
    Finn-Power Crimping Machine Applications | Lillbacka USA | Finn-Power

    For lower qty's, try a short insert, and drill some holes in one tube, plug weld the insert in.

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    What if you made up a rectangular mandrel and then used a hydraulic press to squish the tube OD down hard to the mandrel? The mandrel would prevent the tube from deforming too far. Crush it some on sides A and C then rotate 90 degrees and do sides B and D.

    Red heat would make it easier.

    metalmagpie

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    Always the same question

    Howmany ???

    10 10000 or 1000000 makes a huge difference

    Peter

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    Squish one to fit into other, or stretch one so other fits inside.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Scruffy887 View Post
    Squish one to fit into other, or stretch one so other fits inside.
    Thatswhatshesaid...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Thatswhatshesaid...
    That’s how you liberals have sex? No wonder you cuck olds are always so frustrated

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    Thanks for all the replies, even the last few LOL.
    This will be an ongoing process in which I am trying to save on shipping of a product by shortening the packaging to under 48" to avoid over dimension charges. The customer would have to put the two handle parts together securely as it is a lifting handle. Either compressing one part or swaging the other would work and I intend for a bolt to hold the parts together. At this time I am doing about 1500 of these a year so not a lot but still need a decent wat to accomplish this as it would save $14 per shipment. I do have an Edwards 55 ton ironworkwe with the acc press which would work if I could get the right dies to compress the tube to fit inside the other tube. Is there someone who can suggest a company that could make that die?

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    What if you made up a rectangular mandrel and then used a hydraulic press to squish the tube OD down hard to the mandrel? The mandrel would prevent the tube from deforming too far. Crush it some on sides A and C then rotate 90 degrees and do sides B and D.

    Red heat would make it easier.

    metalmagpie
    Interesting, I may play around with that. I am wondering how side a and c will react when you start compressing b and d.

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    Even if you are able to successfully stage one of the tubes you will likely still have issues getting then to nest. square tube usually has a weld seem down one side and on the inside the weld will have to be removed flush to the surface befor the tubes can be nested

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    Quote Originally Posted by Frederick Harvie View Post
    Even if you are able to successfully stage one of the tubes you will likely still have issues getting then to nest. square tube usually has a weld seem down one side and on the inside the weld will have to be removed flush to the surface befor the tubes can be nested
    True, but I could try and over compress a little to make it work and I have seen examples where the end of the tube is crimped so that it may not be an issue.

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    Curious why you want nested rectangular tubing, with a slip fit? Round tubing with a spring-pin or clutch retainer is commonly used (from metal crutches and tripods to patio umbrellas and garden tools) because it's cheap, readily available in nested sizes, and can be rotated free if something galls a bit. Threaded connections can be even more solid.

    Not so easy or cheap with square or rectangular tube. It's more likely IMO to be either loose (those welded seams) or eventually jam up.

    Assuming the rectangular handle form is necessary for function, another approach is to have a mating tenon and some sort of ball pin, etc. to attach and detach.

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    If you make an insert (to plug weld into one of the pieces) and it extends out to be installed inside the other tube by the customer (and help with bolts) you could make that from sheet metal,
    and leave a small portion out (a slot the full length), for the tube's weld.

    It would look like a "C", and plug welds would be on all 4 sides, pulling the insert out, ensuring a tight fit.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PeteM View Post
    Curious why you want nested rectangular tubing, with a slip fit? Round tubing with a spring-pin or clutch retainer is commonly used (from metal crutches and tripods to patio umbrellas and garden tools) because it's cheap, readily available in nested sizes, and can be rotated free if something galls a bit. Threaded connections can be even more solid.

    Not so easy or cheap with square or rectangular tube. It's more likely IMO to be either loose (those welded seams) or eventually jam up.

    Assuming the rectangular handle form is necessary for function, another approach is to have a mating tenon and some sort of ball pin, etc. to attach and detach.
    Has to be rectangular tube per design so I am stuck on that. My plan is to create a slip joint that would need to be tapped tight with a hammer and then a bolt through both pcs to keep tight.

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    If you make an insert (to plug weld into one of the pieces) and it extends out to be installed inside the other tube by the customer (and help with bolts) you could make that from sheet metal,
    and leave a small portion out (a slot the full length), for the tube's weld.

    It would look like a "C", and plug welds would be on all 4 sides, pulling the insert out, ensuring a tight fit.
    Yes I was mulling over a plug insert and if I had the ability to make that I might consider it but it has to be very strong as it is used as a handle to lift heavy items so that connection has to be very stout.

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    I can't recall where I was, but in the last few days I saw a wheelbarrow with square metal tubing. About 1.5x1.5 inch. The handle area had been scrunched down someone like what you are shooting for.

    If you just have a few, I'd chisel off the inside weld and put a short section of smaller tube in one side of the connection. Screw or plug weld it in.

    If you have kajillions (like if this is for a consumer product) then the added time to figure out and optimize tooling to scrunce the thing might be worth it.

    Other guys know more about that then I do, but would it be possible to scrunch in one direction, then rotate 90° to get both sides scrunched? Still have to chisel or use a file belt sander to get rid of the weld...

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    I would use a rectangular tubing on one side a then machine a solid square bar. It can be cut down to fit the square hole as tight as you want. Make it out of aluminum.
    If the solid square piece is too heavy then it can be drilled through. A square piece with a round hole inside. Nobody will know except you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    I would use a rectangular tubing on one side a then machine a solid square bar. It can be cut down to fit the square hole as tight as you want. Make it out of aluminum.
    If the solid square piece is too heavy then it can be drilled through. A square piece with a round hole inside. Nobody will know except you.

    Plus one here - don't worry about inside weld - find out where it is and mill a groove for it in the insert.

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    It might be easier to overbend the flats so they are all concave, leaving the four corners to align the tubes. The weld seams are going to a little random from tube to tube so if the flats were concave in it would not matter where the seam was. Also that would be a little easier to do not having to upset all the material, some would be bent in.


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