Identifying small drill sizes? (when they end up all over the floor!) - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    picky picky picky

    (that was a joke)


  2. #22
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    Is the OP done yet ?

    S/B if they would get on with the "doing".

  3. #23
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    Drill a single hole with each drill in a mild flat stock 2" x 2" x 3/8" with having 8 F drill mounting holes at the outer edge of each with marking each block and each drill perhaps 1,2,3 and so on. One side of these blocks should be surface ground to be flat and smooth. Build an air chamber box with an opening that the drilled stock blocks will seal with using 8 1/4-20 socket head cap screws and a custom made gasket that fits the square soft stock flat-drilled-gauge-blocks cover pieces.. add air pressure at xy7.oo3 square cubic feet per minuet/second, Gauge the air loss with an IT flux encabulator and line up drills according to the numbers and set them on an upside down cardboard box so they are in a near straight line and going from larger diameter at one side and smaller diameter at the other side. Yes, perhaps the larger on the left and smaller on the right (or the other way would be OK ) When all are lined up in order of size pick up the box and carry it over to your drill storage and put the drill in the proper place

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by michiganbuck View Post
    Drill a single hole with each drill in a mild flat stock 2" x 2" x 3/8" with having 8 F drill mounting holes at the outer edge of each with marking each block and each drill perhaps 1,2,3 and so on. One side of these blocks should be surface ground to be flat and smooth. Build an air chamber box with an opening that the drilled stock blocks will seal with using 8 1/4-20 socket head cap screws and a custom made gasket that fits the square soft stock flat-drilled-gauge-blocks cover pieces.. add air pressure at xy7.oo3 square cubic feet per minuet/second, Gauge the air loss with an IT flux encabulator and line up drills according to the numbers and set them on an upside down cardboard box so they are in a near straight line and going from larger diameter at one side and smaller diameter at the other side. Yes, perhaps the larger on the left and smaller on the right (or the other way would be OK ) When all are lined up in order of size pick up the box and carry it over to your drill storage and put the drill in the proper place
    I was just about to write this!!!

  5. Likes michiganbuck liked this post
  6. #25
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    Here's the Starrett 286 drill index for #61-80 drills.

    286-drill-steel-wire-gage-61-80.jpg

    It's only 2" long.

    Steve

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    As you are painstakingly sorting your drills, might as well be dreaming up something to keep it from happening again!!

    Maybe stacked against a wall (or a board of sorts) with a screw into the cabinet-board/wall so they can't fall? Or train the dog better..

  8. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by rklopp View Post
    I find that digital calipers work fine when measuring with the drill bit oriented longways with the jaws so that the jaws span multiple lands. That way, you don't have to worry about finding the "high spot" across the cutting edges.
    That's how I do it too.

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    put up a sign

    "grrrrrr wof wof grrrrr."

    likely the dog will stay away...

  10. #29
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    Sounds like an apprentice job.


  11. #30
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    Quality bits will be marked with a number down to at least #40 or so. A lighted magnifier or 7x stereo microscope will help you find that quickly. If they're not marked, might well be they're too cheap to be worth the sorting?

    Once you have one to compare to, you can probably pretty quickly pick out other same-size candidates (up to ten of 'em"). For one thing they should be the same length, if from a single batch. If in question, line 'em up and put a small straightedge across the drill bodies and any one smaller or larger will stand out.

    I've found digital calipers work fine for sizing up to #60 as well. I tend to measure across the cutting lips; but in smaller sizes most drill bits made these days don't seem to have the once-traditional back taper. Meaning the body on small sizes may represent the cutting diameter.

    For #61-#80 I've actually found a well-made drill gage faster.

    Could be a job for a curious neighborhood kid, just old enough to be up to the task and happy with a smallish reward?

    Also have a habit of never trusting a drill bit pulled from a Huot bin without a check of size for anything where size is critical and I wouldn't want to make again.

  12. #31
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    put a decent digital caliper across the shank at the top of the flutes and get on with life. They're drills, you don't sweat a thou difference between there and the tip.

    I've put containers of misc drills into drawers this way and it goes quickly, especially if the drawers and drill's decimal equivalent marked

  13. #32
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    I did not consider a drill index plate as mine are Chinese crap and worthless for measuring anything. I have never used a good one such as a Starrett. Off to Ebay to find one.

    They are all USA made drills but anything smaller than #40 have no markings at all.

    Thanks.

  14. #33
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    Well heck that's like easy. Put into the laser mic and spin or chuck up into the spin axis on the vision system.
    Okay not that easy.
    Do you have a indicator mic?
    There is this which you may find a useful addition to the shop at not a big price tag.
    SPI Quick-Action Electronic Micrometer, 0-1" - 10-800-1 - Penn Tool Co., Inc
    The thimble does not move, its a snap guy. Not Etalon when doing round work but just plain handy and will sort your world quickly to likely under the makers tolerances.
    This is a handy gauge to have and certainly faster than poking into a block full of holes or calipers or standard mics.
    Bob

  15. #34
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    I wonder what Gordon's suggestion would be?

  16. #35
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    What I have done is lay the side by side on my inspection rock. Then I'll take a parallel and lay it on the drill bits. you can sort them quickly this way. you don't measure them but just sort them by size.

  17. #36
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    Bring them along when you go to church, or to court, or to an AA meeting. You know how the old ladies knit? Well, sort drills.

    metalmagpie


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