installing crushed carbide on tooling
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    Default installing crushed carbide on tooling

    I got couple of projects that I have coming up and am needing to build some tooling to see whats going to work. if I knew what I needed I would just order it and wait but I dont so my question how are the carbide chips deposited on tooling like this? http://www.ramppco.com/products-well...junk-mill.html is it a premixed rod or brazing puddle with carbide poured in not sure how its done and my google fu isn't working, any advice?

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    Can be as simple as a pretin as it were with braze then roll in the heated crushed grit. Its not easy to diy though, i tried and failed.

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    Rocklinizer.

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    Rumor has it flex seal will work.

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    I'm thinking that what Im trying to do in a bulk system will not work as diy. the chips in the tooling I have purchased in the past are bigger than the rocklinizer can install. I remembered I had bought some rods with big carbide chips at an auction but I dont know what its called any advice? here is some pictures.

    what is flex seal? I come up with something for a water pump
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails img_0082.jpg   img_0081.jpg  

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    Farriers, [The guys who shoe horses] will uses BORIUM rods. Hollow bronze tubes filled with flux and crushed carbide, To braze onto horse shoes on buggy horses and work horses for winter rd.traction. I just saw some recently with the flux on the outside of the tube,instead of inside. But it sure wasn't cheap; sold by the individual stick,and they were only about 1/4"
    Dia, and 12-14" long. You braze it on till you can't hold it anymore,Then braze it to another stick; That way nothings wasted.. Dave [acme thread]

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    I made up some special bits many years ago. I had several thousand dollars of drill tools stuck in a hole in cherty limestone. My solution was to ream the hole around the drill tools. I made my bits from drill casing couplings cut in half. I crushed up all the used carbide I had. I built up the cutting edge with the carbide chips and bronze rod using oxy-acetylene. I did place a thin wall tube inside the casing coupling. The ID would slip over my stuck tools and protect them from the carbide. It projected from the coupling about an inch and it gave me a substrate to lay the carbide & bronze onto. It worked. I was able to retrieve my stuck tools. It took 3 or 4 of these bits to team about 250' of the limestone.

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    "hardfacing" or "Hard Metal" - common in the oil patch

    Long ago at Enpro System the "hard" was fair sized particles fed dry in to the pool of weld metal by purpose built rigs

    Ugly, and rough as a cob, but apparently functional

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    Quote Originally Posted by Illinoyance View Post
    I made up some special bits many years ago. I had several thousand dollars of drill tools stuck in a hole in cherty limestone. My solution was to ream the hole around the drill tools. I made my bits from drill casing couplings cut in half. I crushed up all the used carbide I had. I built up the cutting edge with the carbide chips and bronze rod using oxy-acetylene. I did place a thin wall tube inside the casing coupling. The ID would slip over my stuck tools and protect them from the carbide. It projected from the coupling about an inch and it gave me a substrate to lay the carbide & bronze onto. It worked. I was able to retrieve my stuck tools. It took 3 or 4 of these bits to team about 250' of the limestone.
    Didn't want to order up 40 pints of Nitro eh ?
    Oil Well Shooting Overview

    That's the way they did it down the street in Oil city/Titusville/Pithole Pa.

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    Quote Originally Posted by johnoder View Post
    "hardfacing" or "Hard Metal" - common in the oil patch

    Long ago at Enpro System the "hard" was fair sized particles fed dry in to the pool of weld metal by purpose built rigs

    Ugly, and rough as a cob, but apparently functional
    John, was that placed in subarc flux ?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    John, was that placed in subarc flux ?
    Seems likely.

    As I race towards my 79th birthday in a few days, it helps for you youngsters to remember the true story!

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    A few ways.
    There are arc rods with crushed carbide in them. Often called hardfacing, used for plows and such but the composition of such varies and the "chunks" of carbide are big.
    You can nickle or chrome plate the same crushed carbide to a steel part. This can be done at finer particle sizes and better control.
    Then there is the the thermal spray method :Colonial Bushings inc.
    Wear Resistant Carbide Surfacing#Popular for chuck jaws or such.
    Bob
    (open disclaimer and bias,.... link #1 one a very long time vendor, friend, and on occasion customer)

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    I guess they didn't have tools in the hole.
    I did want to salvage my tools.

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    Stoody 160-E A carbide impregnated electrode.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    A few ways.
    There are arc rods with crushed carbide in them. Often called hardfacing, used for plows and such but the composition of such varies and the "chunks" of carbide are big.
    You can nickle or chrome plate the same crushed carbide to a steel part. This can be done at finer particle sizes and better control.
    Then there is the the thermal spray method :Colonial Bushings inc.
    Wear Resistant Carbide Surfacing#Popular for chuck jaws or such.
    Bob
    (open disclaimer and bias,.... link #1 one a very long time vendor, friend, and on occasion customer)
    I thought "carbide" was a mixture of powdered materials that won't stay together
    if melted in a crucible.
    And a lower temp "cobalt binder" holds that powder together.

    If applied into an electric arc, wouldn't that destroy the binder ?

    Isn't melting out the binder how the recyclers reclaim carbide ?

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    I am trying to cut cast iron or bronze not sure what it is I'm cutting out can't see it or reach it but I want the ,cobs rough shit, I have rented tools with the right stuff on it and it will cut through 1/2" plate in a couple hundred revolutions . Im trying to get past the blockage in a well without replacing the well. illinoyance when you did it did you just pour the carbide chips in as you had a bronze puddle?

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    .....

    If applied into an electric arc, wouldn't that destroy the binder ?

    Isn't melting out the binder how the recyclers reclaim carbide ?
    Strike up your TIG and go after a piece of carbide and try to melt it to a glob or make a puddle.
    The heat in the arc is not long enough to "soak" the particles. Takes many, many hours in the furnace at 3000F to sinter this stuff.
    On B) ...if only it was that easy.
    Bob

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    Flex Seal is a product that is widely advertised on TV as an adhesive and/or coating that will repair anything. One such commercial shows a boat with the bottom cut out and a clear sheet of plastic installed with Flex Seal. He is merrily speeding along in "shark infested waters" relying on the Flex Seal for life and limb.

    The post was a joke. And so is Flex Seal. Grossly overpriced silicone caulk.



    Quote Originally Posted by idacal View Post
    I'm thinking that what Im trying to do in a bulk system will not work as diy. the chips in the tooling I have purchased in the past are bigger than the rocklinizer can install. I remembered I had bought some rods with big carbide chips at an auction but I dont know what its called any advice? here is some pictures.

    what is flex seal? I come up with something for a water pump

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Grossly overpriced silicone caulk.
    When I read the ingredients listed on the can it said "Asphalt".

    So no silicone, no EPDM, no Latex, nothing "rubber" about it.

    Sounds like the old "Rubberized Car undercoating" sold in auto parts stores.
    Which dries and cracks in a short period of time.

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    okay, i now feel dumb, lol, shows how much tv I watch


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