Kester solder & Kester "44"Resin Core Solder differences?
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    Default Kester solder & Kester "44"Resin Core Solder differences?

    One spool box is gray with a black circle for the Kester label.
    Alloy: Sn60
    Flux: 282
    Dia: .031
    Core: 66

    The other spool box is mustard with a light brown circle for the Kester label.
    The box label says Kester "44" Resin Core Solder. Yes, Resin and not Rosin. It must mean their particular fluxed version.
    Alloy; Sn60
    Flux Included: Rosin Core
    Dia: .025
    Core: 66

    Is the "44" type better for electronics soldering? Does it it work better with heavier parts because of the flux? Is the flux not good, corrosive?

    I think these boxes date back to right before lead became a big deal. I remember that the mustard/brown box was a newer type back in the day.

    Still, up to now I just grab whatever solder is near. This time I'm trying o do better. If there's lead then I can use a fan and practice holding my breath.
    Can someone id if one type is better/worse?

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    The 282 flux is apparently "mildly activated" and was developed specifically for difficult electronics assemblies.

    Both are designed for, have been used extensively, and should be excellent for electronics use. The rosin core is kind of a standard solder for electronics.

    I kind of feel like doing a lmgtfy here, but will cut to the chase: the following may be of interest in knowing what the 282 flux is.
    282 Flux-Cored Wire

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    Both of these are flux core solders. The "66" means they contain 3% flux. 282 is a little more "active" than 44, so it will have a little more cleaning action. Both will work just fine for any electronics work. Both are 60/40 tin/lead. Don't hold your breath, use a fan.

    Edit: Bosley posted while I was still fat-fingering my phone keyboard

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    So the smaller diameter "44" is only going to melt faster and probably be better for small pads.

    I also have a spool of Multicore Solder.
    Metal: Sn63
    Dia: .036
    Type: WRMAP3

    Any experience with Multicore?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    So the smaller diameter "44" is only going to melt faster and probably be better for small pads.

    I also have a spool of Multicore Solder.
    Metal: Sn63
    Dia: .036
    Type: WRMAP3

    Any experience with Multicore?
    Yes, it works just fine. So does the earlier 60-40 solder.

    Notice the alloy: 60-40 solder (posting 1 above) is the old standard "radio solder", and will give a cold-solder (gray, non-shiny) surface if anything moves before the joint cools fully. The above Multicore solder is 63-37 Eutectic solder, which freezes abruptly and so rarely yields a cold solder joint. The melting temperature is a tad lower than for 60-40 solder.

    Eutectic system - Wikipedia

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    at melting temp the lead will not gasify, dont need to worry about lead poisoning, but you might still use a fan for the flux smoke...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil in Montana View Post
    at melting temp the lead will not gasify, dont need to worry about lead poisoning, but you might still use a fan for the flux smoke...Phil
    It sure will, but not massively. Any liquid will release some molecules as gas - put a full glass of water on the counter; does it stay full? The same goes for lead when it's liquid. And tin too. All liquids evaporate. If you make two solder joints a decade you don't need to worry about it. If you do a lot of soldering for hours on end you'd better take some precautions.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    It sure will, but not massively. Any liquid will release some molecules as gas - put a full glass of water on the counter; does it stay full? The same goes for lead when it's liquid. And tin too. All liquids evaporate. If you make two solder joints a decade you don't need to worry about it. If you do a lot of soldering for hours on end you'd better take some precautions.
    Soft soldering isn't nearly hot enough for lead fumes to be an issue: "The melting point of lead at 327.5 °C (621.5 °F) is very low compared to most metals. Its boiling point of 1749 °C (3180 °F) is the lowest among the carbon group elements."

    Lead - Wikipedia


    But beware while welding ternplate, just as for welding galvanized steel, only much worse.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    Yes, Resin and not Rosin. It must mean their particular fluxed version.
    Maybe they are correct. Resin is the thick gooey stuff on the tree. Rosin is after you heat it and all the volatile stuff burns off, leaving a hard substance you can use on your violin bow. If solder really had a rosin core, then you couldn't bend it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    Soft soldering isn't nearly hot enough for lead fumes to be an issue: "The melting point of lead at 327.5 °C (621.5 °F) is very low compared to most metals. Its boiling point of 1749 °C (3180 °F) is the lowest among the carbon group elements."
    ...
    Exactly correct. At normal soldering temperatures the vapor pressure of lead is very very small. The most significant risk of lead poisoning using solder like that, is hand-to-mouth. Best precaution is to wash hands after working with it, expecially before eating or drinking anything.

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    Agree with Rozen. Vapor pressure of lead is 5mm mercury at about 700 C. Infintesimally small at tthe 300C iron temperature or the 181 degree melting temperature.

    And yes, wash your hands before eating, drinking, or smoking anything.

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    Resin used in soldering since a long long time ago is also rosin, in blocks for violin and the like bows I found out in school, other things 60/40 is the eutectic of lead tin alloy, aka lowest MP, biggest pasty phase, ideal for manipulation like wiped joints and lead filling dents ( I was told.)
    There’s lead free solder too
    Mark

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    The 44 type is supposed to be better for surface mount. Multicore is for surface mount stuff too. Doesn't clump as mu

    Stated elsewhere that I did a recent test with the 44 type using a Metcal and a Weller. The Metcal soldered faster and
    with small pads I want to get in and out real fast. I only have tips for 695F and 795F. The Metcal is supposed to sense
    the load at the tip and accelerate energy there for the solder operation, then cool real fast when tip is taken away from work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rons View Post
    The 44 type is supposed to be better for surface mount. Multicore is for surface mount stuff too. Doesn't clump as much.
    Both of these kinds of solder well preceded the surface-mount era. Think vacuum tubes and transistors.

    Melted solder doesn't clump unless something moved while the solder was cooling.


    Stated elsewhere that I did a recent test with the 44 type using a Metcal and a Weller. The Metcal soldered faster and with small pads I want to get in and out real fast. I only have tips for 695F and 795F. The Metcal is supposed to sense
    the load at the tip and accelerate energy there for the solder operation, then cool real fast when tip is taken away from work.
    Both Metcals and Wellers are temperature-controlled, meaning that they sense tip temperature, and turn up the power when the temperature drops, such as when the tip is put in thermal contact with something to be soldered. The Metcals are able to do this somewhat better than the Wellers, due to a technology advance. Metcals have displaced the Wellers in many factories.

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    I have worked in electronics for over 45 years and I did electronic hobby work before and since. Probably at least 60+ years with lead based solder. I still use it today. You can even add to that some messing around with casting lead scavenaged from various sources in my younger years. I never used a fan or any kind of filter. I am presently 77 and going OK for that age. No reports of even a hint of an ill effect from my doctor, who makes regular tests of almost everything. He is a lot more concerned about my blood sugar and weight.

    Now I would not recommend eating lead or lead based paint. Nor would I suggest that a commercial facility that is set up primarily for soldering operations. But I think that there are no real effects from this type and level of exposure to lead based solder. And if there is any danger from it at all, it is probably from the solder that rubs off on your fingers and not from the few molecules that become airborne. I did wash my hands before lunch and dinner.

    I fear that the state of California is a bit too worried about some, actually too many things that really do not cause much harm and far to little about things that do.



    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    It sure will, but not massively. Any liquid will release some molecules as gas - put a full glass of water on the counter; does it stay full? The same goes for lead when it's liquid. And tin too. All liquids evaporate. If you make two solder joints a decade you don't need to worry about it. If you do a lot of soldering for hours on end you'd better take some precautions.

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    Sorry about that. But I have observed the core of the older, single core rosin core solders crack and crumble. It IS quite hard and brittle.



    Quote Originally Posted by EmanuelGoldstein View Post
    Maybe they are correct. Resin is the thick gooey stuff on the tree. Rosin is after you heat it and all the volatile stuff burns off, leaving a hard substance you can use on your violin bow. If solder really had a rosin core, then you couldn't bend it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post

    I fear that the state of California is a bit too worried about some, actually too many things that really do not cause much harm and far to little about things that do.
    Lead is dramatically more deleterious to younger, developing bodies:

    Lead poisoning and health

    So while it's not as dangerous for adult males, it is wise to minimize exposure to women of childbearing age (and younger, due to buildup), and especially to babies and children. It's why removing lead from paint and gasoline was so important.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    I fear that the state of California is a bit too worried about some, actually too many things that really do not cause much harm and far to little about things that do.
    That's what happens when the flood gates open and a ton of foreigners arrive and then become voters.
    When they listen to jerk-weed wana-bee candidates talking so kindly about their native countries and
    how well the immigrants will be treated here they turn democrap. The laws reflect underlying attitudes.
    Think of all the smog check I get every 2 years and always pass. What would happen to that immigrant
    stuffing tail pipe all day with a oxygen sensor.

    Though not too many from Afghanistan lately. Some of those immigrants didn't like the arrangements in Cuba.


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