Kurt adding 4% for tariffs ??? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    I fully agree. What I find odd is the USA allowed the war to go on for so long without any response. For decades we've silently taken a thumping. It tickles me to no end to see us finally fighting back.
    Only true from the standpoint of manufacturing; for consumers taking advantage of cheap foreign labor is a plus. And there are a whole lot more consumers than people working in manufacturing, especially given the effects of automation. For consumers any trade war is bad, because it necessitates price increases. With steel I'd be more concerned about the effect on the construction industry than anything else, as they're the ones bringing in low quality Chinese steel.

    That said, the tariffs don't address the root cause of a lot of the cost differential: environmental and safety regulations. IMO tariffs should be directly related to the supply chain meeting US EPA or some European standard (if that's what it takes to get some sort of consensus), and similar on the occupational safety side. Right now we're exporting waste and pollution for the products we (Americans) want to countries with lower wages and quality of life (and it happens at the state level as well, there's a reason manufacturing fled NJ and much of it is directly related to NJ EPA's hard line after decades of toxic waste dumping, the worst of which we're still cleaning up, in some cases 50+ years later). Compliance costs money, in addition to doing some social good.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pariel View Post
    Only true from the standpoint of manufacturing; for consumers taking advantage of cheap foreign labor is a plus. And there are a whole lot more consumers than people working in manufacturing, especially given the effects of automation. For consumers any trade war is bad, because it necessitates price increases. With steel I'd be more concerned about the effect on the construction industry than anything else, as they're the ones bringing in low quality Chinese steel.

    That said, the tariffs don't address the root cause of a lot of the cost differential: environmental and safety regulations. IMO tariffs should be directly related to the supply chain meeting US EPA or some European standard (if that's what it takes to get some sort of consensus), and similar on the occupational safety side. Right now we're exporting waste and pollution for the products we (Americans) want to countries with lower wages and quality of life (and it happens at the state level as well, there's a reason manufacturing fled NJ and much of it is directly related to NJ EPA's hard line after decades of toxic waste dumping, the worst of which we're still cleaning up, in some cases 50+ years later). Compliance costs money, in addition to doing some social good.
    That's a good point about regulations. What we need to do is roll back our regulations to a reasonable level, and DEMAND that all of our foreign suppliers meet at least the same level of regulation, or put a 100% tariff on ALL products coming from them.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    I wonder if Kurt has been 'acquired' by a venture capital firm, the name retained, and added to their 'portfolio' of products. Seemed to be some very diversified products on the site.

    If they've been acquired, the very first action the venture capitilists will do is to cut costs. Sending production to China would be the logical direction.

    I hope that didn't happen

    Kurt Workholding is employee owned. I'm almost certain you would know very soon if they were bought out.

    Quote Originally Posted by Cobranut View Post
    That's a good point about regulations. What we need to do is roll back our regulations to a reasonable level, and DEMAND that all of our foreign suppliers meet at least the same level of regulation, or put a 100% tariff on ALL products coming from them.
    100% tariff in some cases won't be enough.

    Most EPA/OSHA stuff is just the cost of doing business for large companies, but seems extremely convoluted and overbearing to small ones. I'm not convinced that rolling back is the right solution in general (although in the name of continuous improvement I'd expect that these things to be updated and improved, which I'm sure they're not), but I do agree that for most small and medium sized businesses there's space to make breathing room while still maintaining the environmental standards we all want.

    That said, having seen the aftermath of some really bad environmental damage from large industries, there is a good reason for a lot of rules, and allowing small manufacturers to skirt them while holding big ones also prevents a level playing field.

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    I NEVER HEARD OF A MANUFACTURER WHO DID NOT LIKE ANY EXCUSE TO RAISE THEIR PRICES.

    The only thing keeps them from doing so is the fear of losing market share, if they all do it there is not fear.

    dee
    ;-D

  5. #45
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    What I find interesting is that is a surcharge and not a price increase.
    Bob

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    Kurt is either scamming you, or they are not made entirely in the USA with USA steel. Maybe they use offshore cutting tools and use that as an excuse to tax on a surcharge.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    What I find interesting is that is a surcharge and not a price increase.
    Bob
    I wonder if maybe the person that announced the price increase-surcharge was maybe showing some of his/her political opinion/bias. Minneapolis is a rather blue area surrounded by red.

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    Thie is the box for a DX6.

    boxend.jpgkurtbox.jpg

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    Just typical, "pass the buck" mentality. Don't blame us. The government made us do it. Just look at your electric bill. Mine has about four or five lines of this c#@p.



    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    What I find interesting is that is a surcharge and not a price increase.
    Bob

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  12. #50
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    ACME vise corporation:

    "Due to recently imposed steel tarrifs which have caused an increase in raw material costs, we are implementing a tarrif surcharge of 2% on select products. Also, one of our delivery trucks hauling steel fell off a cliff and we lost a big load of steel. We will be adding another 1% because of that, but we will hide it under the tarrif surcharge. Oh, and one of our machinists shot his coworker in the breakroom because he found out the victim was dip'n his willy in the shooter's girl. It was technically a hate crime so it cost us a buttload of money in court costs. That will add another 1% which we will hide in the tarrif surcharge. Thank you for your gullabilit... I mean understanding."



    Consumer:




    https://www.geeksofdoom.com/GoD/img/...0441156824.jpg

    "I don't give a fuck. How much does the vise cost?"

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  14. #51
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    I know some of the Kurt products are cast in Mankato MN and then powdercoated next door and then sent to get machined... last I saw there was pallets of 6" single station vises and some tombstones.

  15. #52
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    I have to disagree with one point here. Regulations are NOT the root cause. They may be part of it, but the root cause is the lower cost of labor in many other countries. For any of a number of reasons, people in some other countries are aviailable and willing to work for lower wages than the people here in the US and other advanced countries. So a factory that makes X can do so for a lower price in those countries. If a factory worker in the US were paid the same amount as one in these countries, he or she would need to work three or more jobs just to survive. Wages, not regulations are the root cause. And that is why businesses, who are forced to compete with others in this world of ours, are motivated to move their jobs to those countries.

    As these other countries develop and their standard or living rises, than the wages paid in them will rise. But this is a slow process that can take decades, not mere years. And some political and social systems will hold this process back with artificially imposed conditions. So it can take even longer. It will take decades; 20, 30, 40, or even more years.

    Regulations, when added to this equation, can often be the tilting factor. But that is on top of the wage differential: the icing on the cake. And even if regulations and their enforcement were universally equal, the root cause would still remain. This is reflected in the current political situation. With the repeal of some excessive regulations, some jobs have returned to the US, but the basic differential in wages remains. We won't be seeing a large increase things like garment manufacturing here in the near future. Nor will this happen in a lot of other areas. Tariffs may level that playing field, but that cost would be paid by the US consumer. I do not recommend it.

    For better or worse, our workers need to stay ahead of the curve. They need to be able to provide services/work product that the foreign workers can not. This means education: our workers need to be smarter and better educated than those of other countries where wages are lower. But this also is a slow, uphill fight. It is hard to motivate a high school student to learn things like algebra and trigonometry and economics and history. They think they will be doing XX when they graduate and don't see any need for other skills. You can meet them behind the counter and in the kitchen at McDonald's. And in the isles of Walmart. The lucky ones, no the more ambitious ones will stumble into something that pays well, but far too many do not.



    Quote Originally Posted by Pariel View Post
    Only true from the standpoint of manufacturing; for consumers taking advantage of cheap foreign labor is a plus. And there are a whole lot more consumers than people working in manufacturing, especially given the effects of automation. For consumers any trade war is bad, because it necessitates price increases. With steel I'd be more concerned about the effect on the construction industry than anything else, as they're the ones bringing in low quality Chinese steel.

    That said, the tariffs don't address the root cause of a lot of the cost differential: environmental and safety regulations. IMO tariffs should be directly related to the supply chain meeting US EPA or some European standard (if that's what it takes to get some sort of consensus), and similar on the occupational safety side. Right now we're exporting waste and pollution for the products we (Americans) want to countries with lower wages and quality of life (and it happens at the state level as well, there's a reason manufacturing fled NJ and much of it is directly related to NJ EPA's hard line after decades of toxic waste dumping, the worst of which we're still cleaning up, in some cases 50+ years later). Compliance costs money, in addition to doing some social good.

  16. Likes Rudd liked this post

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