Largest parts you've worked on? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Everything in a steel plant tends to be big, clue was a 80 ton bridge crane in the machine shop, 300 in fabrication, when it’s big it tends to be painfully boring, like scarfing a 10 m slab of 10”, fing tedious.
    The lathes were dsg, swift and craven, large
    Small is more fun!
    Mark

  2. #22
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    Largest single assembly was a cradle/crate for a nuclear core. The customer came in to flip the small sections for welding, and loading on their fancy trailer- which I worked on too. Tons and pounds are meaningless at some point- you aint moving anything with cranes and new chains.
    largest sub assemblies where the gantry parts to get the tunneler out of the hole in Seattle. Same customer.

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  4. #23
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    rings.jpg
    These cast steel rings are over 150,000 and 120,000 kg each. Designed by a co-worker, not me.

  5. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by memphisjed View Post
    largest sub assemblies where the gantry parts to get the tunneler out of the hole in Seattle. Same customer.
    Funny you should mention that. Bertha the 57' TBM is the biggest stuff I've worked on. I got to crawl all over it while it was in pieces being repaired, back while it was digging again (crawling inside, not outside, of course), and all over it again after it broke out at the end. A 30-ft precision roller bearing is impressive up close to say the least. In-Place Machining did a lot of work for the field repair. The cranes and boring mill in Japan where Bertha was built were a sight to behold, too.


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