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Thread: Lathe accident

  1. #41
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    I have a Nardini lathe that has a simple detent in the center,
    My post #32 is about my latest Nardini, a 16X40. The handle pivots on a pin, toward the tailstock end, the up for reverse (This is the obvious direction, as it's the same as the direction the chuck turns) and down for forward. In front of that pivot pin, inside the knuckle, is a hefty compression spring that's supposed to kick the lever into the detent in the center between forward and reverse.
    That arrangement is very common through many makes of metal lathes, but on my Nardini the spring was broken in the center, I replaced it with a shorter stiffer spring but it still feels wimpy, I want to feel more pressure pushing it sideways out of the detent to start it.
    But the fact is that I realized while writing about this the first time that I've already developed a safety within my mind, a deliberate slight movement towards forward to feel the detent, and this was an unconscious mechanism.
    But what I don't know is whether or not I developed this unconscious mechanism due to the memory of the wild terror rushing through my mind that day 30 years ago when I felt a monster trying to eat me, and let go at the last moment before it wrapped me into a bloody ball.

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr-Mike View Post
    Message to the OP: Hey 'Stubby' stay out of the shop and stay away from heavy machinery. Try scrap-booking.

    "Hi Lads" WTF.
    Another mature answer from a newby! Congratulations!

    Ever heard of Ireland?

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  4. #43
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    I don't get this. A guy, who was admittedly unfamiliar with a particular lathe, leaves the machine's motor running and the spindle in gear while he fiddles with the chuck/chuck key. He then accidentally bumps into the clutch lever, starting the spindle and causes a very unfortunate injury. I'm just not sure how this is the machine's fault exactly.
    The machine didn't start unexpectedly, it started exactly when it should have, when the clutch was engaged. Only unsafe part here was the operator, as far as I can tell.
    I feel bad for the OP. We've all made stupid mistakes, many of which have had, or could have had catastrophic results, and I hate to see anyone injured no matter the cause, but I don't get building a band wagon for "safer" machines here. Perhaps better training???

  5. #44
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    Probably both Derek, in my case the spring was broken. If an employee had gotten killed and anyone remembered me saying it was I'd be in a hurt, a big one, I'd probably lose everything I ever earned.
    Then there's safety meetings, as a wage earner for many years I never saw the plus of them, the plus is that mentioning potential problems and asking people to exercise greater caution, that too can be remembered, to the managers credit.
    But with broken down safety systems time is the legal enemy, they need to be fixed quickly or a jury might say we allowed people to get hurt by being tardy in it.

  6. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by partsproduction View Post
    Probably both Derek, in my case the spring was broken. If an employee had gotten killed and anyone remembered me saying it was I'd be in a hurt, a big one, I'd probably lose everything I ever earned.
    Then there's safety meetings, as a wage earner for many years I never saw the plus of them, the plus is that mentioning potential problems and asking people to exercise greater caution, that too can be remembered, to the managers credit.
    But with broken down safety systems time is the legal enemy, they need to be fixed quickly or a jury might say we allowed people to get hurt by being tardy in it.
    If there's no way to put the machine in neutral or power down the motor you should have refused to run the machine until it was fixed. I would have. When I was still on the machines I never had employers that would ignore a safety issue that I brought to their attention. Usually I would show it to the guy in charge and ask to fix it myself. If that was shut down due to urgent work and I could work around it, then I'd work around it and it would be fixed when we had the time.

  7. #46
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    I have done some stupid things, fortunately was never seriously hurt but learned from my stupidity! I have a machine shop, if there is something I feel will get me hurt I'll correct it. But if I were working for a company that didn't do something to change a dangerous situation I'd walk away from the job and did! I don't want to be the causality that forced the company to fix the problem or OSHA to make an issue from!

  8. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    If there's no way to put the machine in neutral or power down the motor you should have refused to run the machine until it was fixed.
    Mori-Seiki engine lathes, or at least the one that was common in 1974, turn the motor off to stop. When you pull on the lever it starts the motor, in whichever way you pulled. They shit-n-git, too.

    They do have a spring-loaded interlock. Place I worked, the owner removed it as it was kind of a pain in the rear. Friend dumped a wood box of inserts while tightening the chuck, it hit the lever in reverse and pulled him over the top and threw him headfirst into the chip pan. I was laughing so hard it took a few minutes to shut it off and get him out.

    Was pretty funny at the time He didn't leave boxes of anything on the apron after that

    That was a pretty nice lathe otherwise, but I still liked the Monarchs better. They never threw me into the chip pan

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