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  1. #1
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    Default Lathe Identification

    Anyone recognize the below lathe and/or have thoughts on value? It's 100 miles away and going to be auctioned.

    image4.jpg

  2. #2
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    Not really certain on make and model. But.. if you need a lathe do not buy this. If you want something you can spend the next few years cleaning, inspecting, and spending way too much time and money on this may be the machine for you. Looks like it’s sat for a LONG time, I personally would go for something that could be used as is as opposed to something needing many hours of clean up and work to even make a cut on. No telling What condition it’s actually in. I’d pay scrap price for it maybe?

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  4. #3
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    That looks alot like my South Bend Model 34, but it's missing a few key characteristics from the apron controls.

    That's not a huge machine... might swing 13" or so, and I don't see a quick-change tumber for threading, but it's a heckuva lot more machine than an Atlas, or any Asian import.

    On auction, if it got loose for under $300, it'd be worth it. Contrary to Naru's concerns, I highly doubt you'll need to put much time into to get it working... spray it down really good with engine degreaser, then gently work the controls free, then rinse it good with spray penetrant, then come back with some way oil, and it'll be a great little machine to do repairs on shafts 'n stuff.

  5. #4
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    I do not see any change gears so, not for threading.
    Bill D

  6. #5
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    Using items in the picture as a scale, I believe it to be around 55" in total length. It is similar to some South Bends I see online, but nothing matches exactly. The head stock casting looks a little different. Also, the lead screw seem to be in a slot rather than just covered from the top. Although one expects some user modifications on old equipment, the head stock casting seems like something less likely to change. Those aren't change gears behind that cover?

  7. #6
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    Yes that is where the change gears go BUT you need 8 to 12 loose gears so you have something to change. most likely from the picture it does not have power feed for turning,half nuts for threading IF you have the needed gears.

  8. #7
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    I bought it for $200. It is in surprisingly good shape albeit very dirty. It has sat for 25 years and I was told by a family member that their father rarely used it as he worked at a factory that allowed him to use their equipment for personal work.

    The lathe is an A.V Carroll Machine Tool Co. 9in Juniper. Here is a link in case anyone would like to know more about the company: A. V. Carroll Machine Tool Co. - History | VintageMachinery.org They don't list my model, but the one pictured looks very similar. It will take me a while to make room for it and get it cleaned, but I'll try to post pictures if anyone is interested.

    It has a power feed, but change gears could not be found. I suppose one of my first projects will be to make some. There is a tag showing tooth counts for the change gears, so that will help.

    Has anyone ever tried running a VFD motor on one of these leather belt lathes? It would sure simplify things operationally along with reducing height.


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