Lathe Thread Cutting - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 38 of 38
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    Posts
    1,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    324
    Likes (Received)
    941

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    They're perfect for coffee mug coasters. I have an old one (9th edition) and a new one (25th edition), honestly as a Michinast it's nearly useless in 2018.,,
    Seriously? I'd really like to know why you think this way? Dos that mean that you know it all?

  2. Likes tdmidget, snowshooze liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geilenkirchen, Germany
    Posts
    2,254
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1376
    Likes (Received)
    1141

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by machtool View Post
    Mr. Wud makes a good point.

    If we go back to the O.P at post #1.

    It's fairly apparent, this guy is still back at the concept of T.P.I. With respect has has 63 available threads in Imperial pitches, yet wanted to know if he could cut U.S threads. All 63 of them will be derivatives of Threads Per Inch.

    Snowing him under with the 3000 pages of machinery's hand book wont help at this early stage.

    Bill had it covered by post #2.

    You do get a credit, I think you're the only one that has mentioned not disengaging the half nuts, if cutting T.P.I out of a metric screw.

    Regards phil.
    Phil,
    You are not being fair to my comment. I did not state that the Machinery's Handbook is the only reference nor did I insult the OP's intelligence. It is obvious that when it comes to lathes or threads, the OP doesn't know his ass from his elbow. In that light I suggested more reading on the subject. Now, I suspect the OP is a millennial, in which case the use of Google would be well understood, so I also suggested Google as a viable source. However, no machinist or machine person worth his salt should be without a Machinery's Handbook on the shelf. It is an incredible collection of quite difficult to find information.

  4. Likes tdmidget, JohnEvans liked this post
  5. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by bob View Post
    Interesting how some replies answer the question and give useful info, others are condescending designed more to show how smart I am.
    Bob
    Unfortunately Bob that is an issue on almost all forums and Facebook pages. Some people are there to genuinely share info and lift others but many are as you say. It doesn't make a person want to ask more questions or share info...

    I appreciate all the answers to date - even the demeaning ones. I will get a copy of a machinists handbook. I will try harder not to be new and lacking in knowledge.

  6. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    ...the OP doesn't know his ass from his elbow...I suspect the OP is a millennial...
    You just proved my point mate. I should have pointed out in my original thread that I am totally new to machining but I didn't think it would be necessary given the innocence of my question. And I am probably old enough to be your Daddy......

    Please no more replies to this thread unless you are offering friendly help. We are not all experts.

  7. Likes 9100 liked this post
  8. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    England UK
    Posts
    1,794
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    740
    Likes (Received)
    737

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mk1_Oz View Post
    You just proved my point mate. I should have pointed out in my original thread that I am totally new to machining but I didn't think it would be necessary given the innocence of my question. And I am probably old enough to be your Daddy......

    Please no more replies to this thread unless you are offering friendly help. We are not all experts.
    You've read him totally wrong here as evident by your selective quoting changing the context in which it was used. Steve is actually one of the more helpful and informative people about here. Read his post again objectively and you'll discover that he wasn't insulting you at all.

  9. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Location
    Webster Groves, MO
    Posts
    7,036
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1743
    Likes (Received)
    3146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Seriously? I'd really like to know why you think this way? Dos that mean that you know it all?
    He does. We know that because he has often explained it to us. Personally, after only 64 years in the trade, I have a lot of gaps in my knowledge and often use the handbook.

    Bill

  10. Likes Gordon Heaton liked this post
  11. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Norfolk England
    Posts
    1,956
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2356
    Likes (Received)
    1452

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    There is no comparison between the machinery handbook and any slim pocketbook. The Machinery handbook has been in print for more than 100 yrs. My current edition is the 30th and there is a later one. It is just short of 3,000 pages in really, really small print. Jus sayin
    I bet you can't keep it in the top pocket of your overalls.
    It is the ideal reference booklet on the shop floor,all letter, number and metric drill sizes are given in Imperial and metric equivalents.
    It has sine tables,easy to understand trig diagrams,bending allowances and so much more every day information.
    Of course The Bible has so much more info but you need clean hands to handle it and you don't carry it around with you.

  12. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Location
    Kansas
    Posts
    7,356
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    419
    Likes (Received)
    3358

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mk1_Oz View Post
    ...

    Please no more replies to this thread unless you are offering friendly help. ...
    If you stick around a while one of the first things you will learn is the innate impossibility of dictating a thread's direction. As long as you have a strong pitchfork to separate all the manure you will find many nuggets of useful information. One or two may actually be on topic.

    My machinery's handbook usage is #1, screw thread information and #2 keyway/keyseat data.

  13. Likes Screwmachine liked this post
  14. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gbent View Post
    ...As long as you have a strong pitchfork to separate all the manure you will find many nuggets of useful information...
    lol.... pitchfork on order

    If I have read anybody wrong I apologise. Not trying to make issues (I am a newbie to the site :O).....

  15. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    Posts
    1,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    324
    Likes (Received)
    941

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mk1_Oz View Post
    ...I will try harder not to be new and lacking in knowledge....
    Good luck with that. I've been doing this for over 50 years and I'm still lacking in some areas. I don't think you can ever
    know it all...

  16. #31
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    4,256
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1152
    Likes (Received)
    2323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LKeithR View Post
    Seriously? I'd really like to know why you think this way? Dos that mean that you know it all?
    The reason is; I rarely use it...the reason I rarely use it, is most of the info. is readily available at the click of a mouse. So for me, poring over 2500 pages is a waste of my time. Before Internet, I used it regularly, after some years I noticed the black smudges from my fingers were really only on One or Two sets of tabs, I realized at that moment that the rest of it was unused, hence coffee mug coaster.

    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    He does. We know that because he has often explained it to us. Personally, after only 64 years in the trade, I have a lot of gaps in my knowledge and often use the handbook.

    Bill
    I most certainly do not, and have not ever implied that. I'm rude, remember Bill.

  17. #32
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Location
    Langley, B.C.
    Posts
    1,606
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    324
    Likes (Received)
    941

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    The reason is; I rarely use it...the reason I rarely use it, is most of the info. is readily available at the click of a mouse. So for me, poring over 2500 pages is a waste of my time. Before Internet, I used it regularly, after some years I noticed the black smudges from my fingers were really only on One or Two sets of tabs, I realized at that moment that the rest of it was unused, hence coffee mug coaster.
    Fair point. If you've got the necessary sites pre-located and bookmarked it can be pretty quick to look stuff up.
    If you have to search for it, well, that's another story. I've wasted more time than I care to admit while searching
    for something on the net--it is easy to get distracted.

    Besides, I don't actually have a computer in the shop and, in reality, I like the feel of the Machinery's handbook
    when I'm reading it. I like the heft and the feel of the paper and the fact that if I turn just one more page I can
    find something completely new to study (yeah, OK, so I'm wasting time again; nobody ever said that the internet
    was the only place where that happens.

    And you're right, my copy shows real wear/use in only a few places--but it's really nice to have all the info there
    when I really need it...

  18. #33
    Join Date
    Nov 2003
    Location
    Beaumont, TX, USA
    Posts
    4,809
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    165
    Likes (Received)
    1449

    Default

    I have two paper and ink copies and a disk version, all different editions. The first, a paper and ink copy, I found in a second hand book store. Just dumb luck, but I do like to browse those places. I love the smell of old paper.

    The second paper and ink copy came to me free. I was a department head at a company and already had a company copy. But some dumb sales person at an equally dumb company sent out a completely unsolicited copy with a bill for it enclosed. I wrote back telling them that my company did not need it and that I would be happy to send it back if they provided a prepaid shipping label. I got several more bills for it, but no prepaid shipping label. I'll be damned if I am going to waste any money, mine or the company's due to such shady sales tactics. So I kept the older company copy and the company had that new one.

    The disk was from a purchase of a combination of book and disk for another company where I worked. For some reason, I wound up with an upgrade disk which I used at that company. I kept the original disk and it is loaded on my computer, here at home.

    So overall, I only paid the one, used book price for all three. How do you find one? E-bay, Amazon, local used book stores, etc. Keep your eyes open.

    As for version, I find the early version that I purchased at the used book store is just fine for virtually all of the work that I do. I keep that version in my shop for quick reference. Now, if you are in a commercial shop and have to guarantee that you are up to the very latest standards, then you do need a fairly new version. But, since you do not presently have one, I doubt that. So, for all intents and purposes, almost any version that you find will be good. The newer versions of the standards almost always must be compatible with the older ones. So, the old ones do not suddenly become invalid. The new ones are generally only refinements of the older ones.


    Quote Originally Posted by Mk1_Oz View Post
    ...<snip>...

    Appreciate all the answers. I am trying to find a copy of a machinist's handbook. If anybody has any suggestions (author, new vs old etc) they would be appreciated.

    ...<snip>....

  19. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    656
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    160
    Likes (Received)
    188

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    Phil,
    You are not being fair to my comment. I did not state that the Machinery's Handbook is the only reference nor did I insult the OP's intelligence. It is obvious that when it comes to lathes or threads, the OP doesn't know his ass from his elbow. In that light I suggested more reading on the subject. Now, I suspect the OP is a millennial, in which case the use of Google would be well understood, so I also suggested Google as a viable source. However, no machinist or machine person worth his salt should be without a Machinery's Handbook on the shelf. It is an incredible collection of quite difficult to find information.
    The reference was "machinists handbook" and was clarified by a later post to "Machinery's handbook".
    The original question was quite clear...

    I believe that you have made some assumptions about the OP and would be better to enquire or elucidate than assume. If it were a "millenial" asking (as if it matters), should he or she be expected to feel better after being told to Google? IIRC the question was primarily about reference books and I've noticed books becoming rarer(and dumber) of late...

    One who is upright and honest to seek knowledge, ask a question is most welcome; enlighten them.

    OP- a thread can have a pitch measured in TPI (threads per inch) or mm. The basic difference between the two sytems is that TPI represents the number of threads in an inch, the other represents a direct measurement of the pitch or repeat of the thread. A metric thread can be designated in mm or TPI but rarely the latter because it is usually not a whole number.
    The shape of the thread form in combination with the pitch is standardised between the various thread systems- BSF and BSW use a 55 degree form whereas the others are 60 degree. There are other differences in peak and root shape too.
    If your machine can make the tool move at the correct speed relative to the spindle, it can make a screw of any diameter and any threadform. The pick-off gears or thread cutting gearbox change the ratios to allow this, so if you have the right gears or combination within the machine any standard is possible.

    The most common difference in pitches between imperial standards is that UNF/UNC has 13 TPI for a 1/2" bolt whereas BSW uses 12 tpi for the same, IIRC most of other common ones are the same.
    BSF has a couple of pitches that are not seen elsewhere such as 5/16-22.

    Metric- much the same applies, but if the machine has an imperial leadscrew than a transposing gear is required to make imperial threads, either 127 or 63 teeth. If the machine has a metric leadscrew a transposing gear is also required. Measuring the pitch of the leadscrew will tell you what type you have.
    The machine or its book will often have thread cutting info in a chart (and on the thread cutting gearbox if fitted), but key thing is that if a transposing gear is being used then the half-nuts should be left closed.

    Zeus tables are available at Blackwoods, less than the price of a couple of beers and less inclined to make one stupid.

  20. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    211
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    60

    Default

    The Whitworth thread is a different thread form than those used in the Unified Thread System. UNC, UNF and UNS United National Course and Unified National Fine and United National Special all using a 60 degree thread form. I'm not familiar with the term "modular thread types". I think the "Imperial" is replaced by the Unified System which refers to the "old" English Thread System used before the Second World War. It's still around. Before the beginning of the coming war the British and the United States adjusted the slight difference in the two countries Thread Systems; creating the Unified Thread System allowing inter-changeability for the war effort. It may help reading up on the Unified Thread System. It's as easy as cutting the diameter of screw with the number of threads you desire in the unified system. To cut a 3/8-18UNC or a 3/8-24UNF; turn the screw diameter to .375 dia. Set the lathe lead screw to either 18 or 24 threads. My Machinery's Handbook is 13th addition I bought in 1953.
    Happy New Year
    Roger

  21. #36
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Country
    AUSTRALIA
    Posts
    15
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3

    Default

    Good stuff all.

    I now have a PDF copy of the 27th Edition and am amazed at the info in it. 400 odd pages of maths!!!! There is bound to be very useful info in there but it will be a case of knowing what is there and where!!!

    I don't know what is meant by 'moduler threads' either. The original sales literature for the machine mentions it.

  22. #37
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Location
    Geilenkirchen, Germany
    Posts
    2,254
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1376
    Likes (Received)
    1141

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by litlerob1 View Post
    The reason is; I rarely use it...the reason I rarely use it, is most of the info. is readily available at the click of a mouse. So for me, poring over 2500 pages is a waste of my time. Before Internet, I used it regularly, after some years I noticed the black smudges from my fingers were really only on One or Two sets of tabs, I realized at that moment that the rest of it was unused, hence coffee mug coaster.



    I most certainly do not, and have not ever implied that. I'm rude, remember Bill.
    OK, I get it, but not all the data contained in the Machinery's Handbook is readily available on the net and the net may not be available when you need it. It is this same principle that causes me to have a back-up generator available. I have two of the Handbooks, one in PDF, which is searchable and one in print. I must also admit that it is a rare occasion that I refer to the Handbook, but like Bill, I certainly do time to time and certainly would not be without one.

  23. #38
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Utah
    Posts
    4,256
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1152
    Likes (Received)
    2323

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by steve-l View Post
    OK, I get it, but not all the data contained in the Machinery's Handbook is readily available on the net and the net may not be available when you need it. It is this same principle that causes me to have a back-up generator available. I have two of the Handbooks, one in PDF, which is searchable and one in print. I must also admit that it is a rare occasion that I refer to the Handbook, but like Bill, I certainly do time to time and certainly would not be without one.
    I own 2.

    R


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •