Legality of shop made electrical boxes - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strostkovy View Post

    My question is if we were to make more such equipment (and it was otherwise to code regarding dimensions and volume and protection) would we be able to have out shop made parts installed by a licensed electrician in a permitted project without issue?
    Did you ever think about calling a local electrician, have him come over show him your home made boxes and asking whether he/she would be willing to install them?

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by triumph406 View Post
    Did you ever think about calling a local electrician, have him come over show him your home made boxes and asking whether he/she would be willing to install them?
    No, because some of them are already installed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Just a Sparky View Post
    Sounds like what you need is an overhead plug-on busway or two. They hang well below existing pipes. Put a machine in? Plug in a bus plug and drop to the machine. Take out or move a machine? Remove the bus plug and drop for later use somewhere else.

    De-energized of course. Big busways fed right off the gear have lots of available fault current and are protected by big breakers with relatively long clearing times. Wouldn't be fun to find out the stabs are misaligned when you try to plug in live.






    Also worth mentioning as someone did above, the legality of doing your own work inside of your own commercial shop is questionable depending on the state you're in. At least around here, IIRC you need a signatory master electrician on your payroll to perform in-house electrical work in lieu of a licensed, bonded and insured contractor.

    There are a lot of moving parts when it comes to electricity and if you don't deal with the technicalities on a daily basis it's easy to screw up something serious. E.G. selective coordination, equipment short-circuit current ratings, OCPD interrupting ratings, available fault current calculations, arc energy labeling requirements, temperature and current-carrying conductor de-ratings, acceptable usage of flexible cords and cables... Proper grounding and bonding is probably the most frequent screw-up, especially with flexible conduits and cables as well as 'hard' pipes entering through concentric/eccentric knockouts.
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan from Oakland View Post
    If you don't mind the initial investment cost, buss duct is a pretty slick way to go, and there is lots of it on the surplus market.
    Bus duct is for sure awesome, but I can't even afford to look at the stuff

  4. #24
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    That pic with all the leads being terminated with Set Screw terminals....I have to wonder just how acceptable that is. Maybe for low voltage it's OK, but it wouldn't be for medium or high voltage. Crimp lugs are used then.

    The poster who said the issue would lie in getting past local codes had it right....there is no real 'law' that says you need UL listing otherwise. UL here in the USA is well entrenched for the under 600V stuff.

    Make a box for 13.8KV? Guess what? UL doesn't even list 13.8kv equipment....make your own box and if you adide by NEMA volumes and clearances, that's all you need.

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    Anything over 600volt and nec goes away, the inspectors wouldn,t have a clue anyway. I wire up a mill with 4160 motors, the state inseptor wouldnt even look in the panels, left that for the inc co...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    That pic with all the leads being terminated with Set Screw terminals....I have to wonder just how acceptable that is.
    All day, every day.

    Set screw lugs are bread and butter for <1kV services and feeders. Torque, deflect, torque again and you're good to go. Crimp lugs are a pain in the butt and aren't usually seen except on industrial jobs where there are enough big terminations to have a power crimper and complete die set loaned out from the shop long term.

    Most panels, disconnects, VFDs, big breakers, etc. ship with set screw lugs. Transformers are about the only place off the top of my head where set screw lugs are not either built-in or factory-supplied. Very common to see 2-4 barrel set screw lugs for the circuit conductors and 4+ barrel set screw lugs for grounding and bonding inside transformers.

    Grounding electrode conductor, system bonding jumper, one or more equipment grounding conductors, local water pipe bonds... the count adds up quick in a paralleled installation.



    @phil - 2020 NEC goes to 2kV and above. Just need engineering supervision for a lot of it.

  8. #27
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    I am sure a print shop in China or Russia would print up some NEC approved labels for cheap. Problem solved.
    Bill D

  9. #28
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    I love gutters / wireway. I ring my shops with it. Then it is just a simple drop down with EMT for a disconnect or outlet. I usually use 4" or 6" wireway and space it off the wall with strut. EMT drops going straight down for about a foot before they are offset bent to attach to the wall. That foot below the wireway allows my airline to run on the same vertical strut. In each section of gutter I have a section of ground bar that is screwed to the back of the wireway. That ground bar has a single #6 wire that connects each ground bar and goes back to the electrical panel. So ground wires for each machine / outlet just come up to the wireway and at most 5' to the nearest ground bar.

    But keep in mind they aren't a free pass on conductor derating. You can put 30 conductors in a wireway and run at full rating. But once you put that 31st current carrying conductor in there, you have to derate 40%. And there are minimum cross sectional area and distances for cable turns and straight through pulls.

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