Lifting heavy lathe chuck so it lay flat.
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  1. #1
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    Default Lifting heavy lathe chuck so it lay flat.

    I have several 10" lathe chucks that I switch around. Not a big deal for my size to mount and unmount. I would like to store them laying flat on their mounting pins inside some big cooking pots to prevent rust. I need to make a lifting handle that grabs straight down into the open chuck like an ice hook. Any ideas out there.
    These are D1-4 if that matters. An actual ice hook worries me since they might slip off. Maybe an eye bolt held by the jaws and a ice hook.
    Bill D

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I have several 10" lathe chucks that I switch around. Not a big deal for my size to mount and unmount. I would like to store them laying flat on their mounting pins inside some big cooking pots to prevent rust. I need to make a lifting handle that grabs straight down into the open chuck like an ice hook. Any ideas out there.
    These are D1-4 if that matters. An actual ice hook worries me since they might slip off. Maybe an eye bolt held by the jaws and a ice hook.
    Bill D
    .
    chuck up a 2" round drilled and tapped for a eyebolt and pick it with that. if chuck is tight it will hold a lot of weight

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    You could buy a few extension nuts, and chuck them tight, flush with the front of the chuck jaws. Screw in a lifting eye and hoist away.

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    Tee-nut and stud from the mill table? Chuck up on the stud lightly and let the nut do the holding.

    Are you wanting these to live with the chucks when they're not in use? B7 all-thread and HH nuts are dirt cheap.

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    most shops have small pieces of metal in large quantities. wouldnt be the first time i took metal out of garbage can and drilled and tapped a hole in what 2 minutes for a eyebolt.
    .
    seems some spend more time thinking or talking about it than actually doing stuff

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    I do a lot of milling from chucks laid on their backs. I store them flat on their backs and have made lifting eyes for each that are just a piece of round bar with a small upset on the chuck end that sits behind the jaws so that even when chucked lightly it can't slip out. Simple eye on the opposite end.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I have several 10" lathe chucks that I switch around. Not a big deal for my size to mount and unmount. I would like to store them laying flat on their mounting pins inside some big cooking pots to prevent rust. I need to make a lifting handle that grabs straight down into the open chuck like an ice hook. Any ideas out there.
    These are D1-4 if that matters. An actual ice hook worries me since they might slip off. Maybe an eye bolt held by the jaws and a ice hook.
    Bill D
    There was a foto "right here on PM" that resembled an uber-strong but very short paint roller with flanges. It allowed rotating the chuck whilst on / still on the hook to make attach / detach to the spindle easier.

    VPI paper, fresh bundle once a year, rest of the "challenge" KISS methods to suit, "cooking pots" maybe not required?

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    Thanks for the help. I had not thought of using a slug of metal on the eyebolt. I was worried chucking just the threaded part might not be strong enough. I think I will thread both ends and use a bolt and washer on the bottom end so it can not slip through the jaws.
    Bill D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Thanks for the help. I had not thought of using a slug of metal on the eyebolt. I was worried chucking just the threaded part might not be strong enough. I think I will thread both ends and use a bolt and washer on the bottom end so it can not slip through the jaws.
    Bill D.
    That's exactly how I move my rotary table with 8" chuck mounted on top of it. No way I'm going to lift the thing, I pick it up with a baby engine hoist.

    PDW

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    You say you are OK with lifting the weight of the chucks so I assume you need the hook for lowering then into and lifting them out of the storage pots. How about turning those pots upside down. Place the lid on a counter or shelf and place the chuck on it. Then put the pot over it. That way you have easy access to the chuck at all times.

    You could make a plate with handles on it from (aluminum) scrap in place of the original pot tops. It would lay flat on a shelf or table and the handles would make moving the stored chuck easier. Some additional pieces of scrap could be bolted down on these improvised "tops" to prevent the chuck from sliding around while being moved. Perhaps a round piece that fits inside the circle of the mounting studs.

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    Another thought is why are the chucks rusting? And if they are, isn't every other iron and steel machine part? Surely that's worth trying to fix (dehumidifiers, insulation, warming elements)?

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    If you put the chucks in cooking pots, you organise rust. Different metals afford electronegative potential, ever so little, doesn’t matter. You’ll have corrosion with the slightest amounts of humidity.

    Have some wooden stands, keep the chucks lightly greasy. Wood sucks in oil, chucks will last way longer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mechanola View Post
    If you put the chucks in cooking pots, you organise rust. Different metals afford electronegative potential, ever so little, doesn’t matter. You’ll have corrosion with the slightest amounts of humidity.

    Have some wooden stands, keep the chucks lightly greasy. Wood sucks in oil, chucks will last way longer.
    I agree. Hard to see how metal pots are going to "prevent rust".

    -Marty-

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    eyenuts are like a eyebolt. you can screw a long length bolt into a eyenut and use that tight in a chuck to pick it. the head of the bolt will help it not slide out of chuck although if chuck tight i never saw one slip just picking up the chuck
    .
    eyenut - Google Search

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    I only have rust issues if the winter is colder then normal. I have a golden rod heater in the base of the lathe and with a blanket over the lathe no rust issues. My mill/drill a blanket alone seems to be enough. I will bend a golden rod heater and get it into the base before winter. My drill press and tablesaw do not rust. nor do tools left on the bench. I think the lathe and mill are so thick they stay below dew point as air warms up in the day.
    This only occurs if the shop goes below 45-50 which requires the temperature to go below freezing. freezing temps seldom occur in my climate.
    Bill D.
    Modesto, CA. USA

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    After you put a chuck in a pot, fill the pot with oil. Then it will not rust.

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    Quote Originally Posted by metalmagpie View Post
    After you put a chuck in a pot, fill the pot with oil. Then it will not rust.
    I have been thinking that way

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    I have been thinking that way
    It is not, necessarily, true!

    G'Dad did that into "many" Maxwell-House Cawfee cans, unfortunately with used motor oil, but that wasn't the half of the eventual problem.

    He's forgotten than ANY moisture as alighted from evening dew or any other condensation would be HEAVIER than oil and find its way to the bottom of the tin. From which hidden position it most assuredly DID cause rust. Google "RMS Titanic".

    Boesheild, Fluid Film, and more exist. VPI paper is cheap in rolls and bundles.

    AFAIK these only cause Cancer when deployed within the borders of California. But then again, so does air or water.. if not also RUST.. even taxes?

    You could perhaps relocate to Texas? Nobody will "mess with Texas".


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    Well, I hate to tell you, but Texas has as many climates as you can count. On one day, some years ago, I saw a temperature map on a weather program that had a 70 degree F spread of temperature bands across the state: freezing in the north-west and 90s in the south-east: really, 70 degrees spread at the same time, all in Texas. I have lived in El Paso and it is as dry and hot as you could imagine. In the summer the asphalt streets literally melt. That's West Texas. Now I live in Beaumont which is both near the eastern border and quite close to the Gulf of Mexico. We get both regular humidity and, on occasion, ocean spray which is salty. Yes, with a good wind, the salt spray can travel many miles inland. Rust heaven!

    Rust certainly will mess with Texas or at least with this corner of it. My shop has air conditioning and that is a really big help because it keeps the humidity down and the salt air out. But I can still get rust if I leave steel out and unprotected with oil or wax.



    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    It is not, necessarily, true!

    ...<snip>...

    You could perhaps relocate to Texas? Nobody will "mess with Texas".


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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Well, I hate to tell you, but Texas has as many climates as you can count. On one day, some years ago, I saw a temperature map on a weather program that had a 70 degree F spread of temperature bands across the state: freezing in the north-west and 90s in the south-east: really, 70 degrees spread at the same time, all in Texas.
    LO! It WAS meant as a joke, and you should expect that temp swing. Texas is slightly larger than France, after all!



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