Lindstrom Cutter Quality?
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  1. #1
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    Default Lindstrom Cutter Quality?

    I had my trusty Lindstrom "made in Sweden" 8150 cutters break down and wanted to see if there is any input here. The plastic insulating handle material is what failed and now they are difficult to use without the thicker handle and the return spring.

    In searching to replace these it looks like they are all made in Spain now. My old set had a printed wire range on the handle to cut steel and range for copper but it looks like all the new ones only mention copper! I am thinking they are inferior to my old pair. Can anyone confirm the quality of todays versions?

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    I have a set that I use for electronics stuff. I wouldn't use them on steel unless it's very soft. They do sell cutters with carbide teeth that are more suited if you need to cut spring steel often. I like the Erem cutters a lot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin T View Post
    I had my trusty Lindstrom "made in Sweden" 8150 cutters break down and wanted to see if there is any input here. The plastic insulating handle material is what failed and now they are difficult to use without the thicker handle and the return spring.

    In searching to replace these it looks like they are all made in Spain now. My old set had a printed wire range on the handle to cut steel and range for copper but it looks like all the new ones only mention copper! I am thinking they are inferior to my old pair. Can anyone confirm the quality of todays versions?
    I have many Lindstom cutters, bought in Swedent when I worked there in the mid 1970s. I'm looking at my favorite, a model 8160, which still works perfectly.

    Lindstrom still exists. I'd send them an email (it can be in English) asking if they have spare parts, or if the new insulating handles will fit the old cutters. They may well.

    I bet that cutters made in Spain are just fine. Spain has been making steel cutting tools for centuries. Spain is not China.

    My 8160 cutters also allowed use on steel piano wire, but there is a tradeoff there - the blades must be far harder and thus more brittle. And I never did cut piano wire with it - there are special cutters for that. And one can use a cutoff disk grinder.

    I just looked at model 8160 cutting pliers at MSC - they look exactly like what I bought in the 1970s, except for some details of the insulating handles, but I bet the new handles will fit the old pliers. MSC may be able to get spare parts.

    8144: https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/85908424 -- Has the most pictures.

    8160: https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/88535596

    8150: mscdirect.com is currently unavailable

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    New ones are IMO decent but not as good as the old Swedish-made. Same as Bahco .. some of the Bahco-branded products are actually utter shit.
    (both part of snap-off empire nowadays)

    Erem for me, thank you.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    ..." Spain has been making steel cutting tools for centuries. Spain is not China."...
    This was on my mind, thanks

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    Might be a duff batch - wouldn't be the first time with tool manufacturers

    FWIW I adopt the softly softly approach like ''having used your # whatever cutters for years with complete satisfaction I've found a fault on my latest purchase etc etc.... now I fully realise I could have damaged the cutters, but cannot recall ever doing so in x years'' etc etc


    Let's just say I've yet to be disappointed with the outcome

  7. Likes Gordon Heaton, Ron Hofer liked this post
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    Default An Update

    I asked a Swedish friend (who bought all his tools before the 1970s) if Lindström is still good. He called the company in Sweden, and found only a sales operation. It turns out that Lindström is now owned by Snap-On; this is not at all obvious from Lindström's website, but the Snap-On website is clear.

    Our Brands | Snap-on Incorporated

    Snap-On is actually a good home for Lindström, as Snap-On always made very good but very expensive tools -- exactly Lindström's niche.

    Manufacturing pliers in Spain has to be a factor cheaper than in Sweden, so I bet the whole factory was picked up and moved to Spain.

    I did stumble on something surprising while Googling around for 8160 cutters - jewelers also use Lindström tools, and pay far less for them, about one half. Must be a very competitive market. Here is one such source:

    Lindstrom 8160

    On Amazon, I did find some what appear to be counterfeit Lindström tools as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    On Amazon, I did find some what appear to be counterfeit Lindström tools as well. [/SIZE]
    If you have a link at hand that would be interesting...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    I asked a Swedish friend (who bought all his tools before the 1970s) if Lindström is still good. He called the company in Sweden, and found only a sales operation. It turns out that Lindström is now owned by Snap-On; this is not at all obvious from Lindström's website, but the Snap-On website is clear.

    Our Brands | Snap-on Incorporated

    Snap-On is actually a good home for Lindström, as Snap-On always made very good but very expensive tools -- exactly Lindström's niche.

    You wish. Lots of Bahco products here in europe went downhill after Snap-On ownership. Weirdly enough they seem to be unable to decide if they want to cater the expensive pro tooling market or compete with Harbor Freight. Bahco ratchets and sockets are available both Taiwanese/chinese versions and ones made in US (same factory as Snap-on?)
    Some of the asian imported Bahco tooling is pretty lousy even by chinese hand tool standards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    If you have a link at hand that would be interesting...
    Try this. Look at the one-star review.

    Amazon.com: B00ZYCFIME

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    Quote Originally Posted by MattiJ View Post
    You wish. Lots of Bahco products here in europe went downhill after Snap-On ownership. Weirdly enough they seem to be unable to decide if they want to cater the expensive pro tooling market or compete with Harbor Freight. Bahco ratchets and sockets are available both Taiwanese/chinese versions and ones made in US (same factory as Snap-on?)
    Some of the asian imported Bahco tooling is pretty lousy even by chinese hand tool standards.
    As for Snap-On's traditional market niche, this is a matter of history, not hope. In the 1970s when I bought most of my hand tools for working on cars, the big debate was Snap-On versus Craftsman (which were good back then). Snap-On was about double the cost of Craftsman, but Craftsman had a no-questions lifetime warranty - if it broke, Sears would simply replace it. I once found a rusty half-inch ratchet and took it to Sears, and got a new one in exchange. Still have it. Suffice it to say that while most people bought Craftsman, Snap-On is still very much a going concern, and still have high prices. Their customers are largely mechanics who would know the difference, and are willing to pay Snap-On's prices.

    As for Bahco, I have a few of their screwdrivers bought in Sweden the 1970s, but have no subsequent experience. I don't think Bahco was available in the US back then.

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    I think he's talking about current production, not historical. As far as current origin goes, the actual Snap-On branded tools seem to be fairly safe still so far, but he is saying that some of the other tools under their umbrella via different brands may not be. I would not be surprised at all to learn that this is the case.

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    I don't let anyone near my Lindstrom 8140 cutters. Copper wire only. We have a lot of people around here that like to cut piano wire and found that Aven makes some inexpensive carbide insert cutters that work well, though the price seems to have gone up a lot. Aven 10821TCS Accu-Cut Hard Wire Cutter Oval Head 125 mm Semi-Flush: Amazon.com: Home Improvement Knipex makes some nice ones too, but they're very proud of them judging by the price.

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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    I think he's talking about current production, not historical. As far as current origin goes, the actual Snap-On branded tools seem to be fairly safe still so far, but he is saying that some of the other tools under their umbrella via different brands may not be. I would not be surprised at all to learn that this is the case.
    Yeah, my comment was more about Snap-on being not so "good home" for European brands than actual Snap-on manufactured/branded tools quality.

    Seem to work both ways, Snap-on branded adjustable wrenches are actually Bahco Spain with fancy chrome and "Plier Wrenches" Bahco Argentina.
    Both sold under Snap-on brand and not the low-cost? blue-point brand.

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    Well, at this point the OP can get a pair from the jewelry suppliers for about $30 (versus $90), and report back. Probably no other way to settle the issue.

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    I followed my own advice, and bought an 8150 cutting plier. It's similar to the 8160 I bought in the 1970s, but the next smaller size, which is useful to have. Cost about $25. Micro-Bevel 112.5 mm.

    Summary. It looks and feels like the real Lindstrom. The joint is very tight, and is adjustable - still uses the original joint design. It no longer says where it was made. The cutting edges meet perfectly, letting no light through.

    The handles are still yellow, but the old 8160 is a darker shade. I think it was always that shade.

    Anyway, it is certainly worth $25.

    Lindstrom 8150-80-Series Micro-Bevel Cutter - Medium Head - 14-28 Guage Cutting Capacity - 4.43" L - Side Cutting Pliers - Amazon.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post


    Try this. Look at the one-star review.

    Amazon.com: B00ZYCFIME
    Joe,

    That link pretty much locks my computer. I don't think it's really an amazon link.

    Ron


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