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  1. #181
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    Edge Precision , Peter does excellent work.

    Robin does a good job as well.

    Don @ Suburban tool & Keith

    Of course there are others, but those are the ones I look for.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    The thing that bugs me is ;- either Youtubers have such huge egos they're prepared to put a lot of time and effort in to making editing ands posting etc etc videos …………. OR there's a lot more in it than is being let on.

    Taking Abom for example, …….. we know he can make a good hourly rate machining and wheeling and dealing with tools and machinery ……….so can YouTube match it?
    Why not both? Variety is very nice, especially if you are a one man band. Do some work, shoot some video, edit on your couch drinking a nice beverage. You can do both, or all three or more. I have gotten to the point where the all mighty dollar seems less mighty if I hate my life earning it.

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    Two days in, and Keith's fundraiser "The move" Turn Wright Machine Works
    is at $57k!
    I sure wish I would have had $57k in the bank last time I moved my shop (god knows I spent more than that).
    I wonder how taxes work on a go-fund-me?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Limy Sami View Post
    The thing that bugs me is ;- either Youtubers have such huge egos they're prepared to put a lot of time and effort in to making editing ands posting etc etc videos …………. OR there's a lot more in it than is being let on.

    Taking Abom for example, …….. we know he can make a good hourly rate machining and wheeling and dealing with tools and machinery ……….so can YouTube match it?
    This bugs me as well. They all say: "there is no money in youtube" and "I don't make hardly anything doing this".

    Yet, like you say, Adam is the perfect example: quits his job and immediately buys a brand-new $40+k truck, and probably $20~25k travel trailer.
    Builds a building. Buys several more machines. Can afford to constantly be traveling all over the place. Etc.

    Good for him! But, don't freakin' tell me there is no money in youtube!

    Ave is another. Buys a brand-new $100+k CNC, with absolutely zero need!

    Yet, they all stress that there is no money in making youtube videos. There would be a whole lot more respect if they quit saying that shit.
    Because it obviously is not the reality.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    This bugs me as well. They all say: "there is no money in youtube" and "I don't make hardly anything doing this".

    Yet, like you say, Adam is the perfect example: quits his job and immediately buys a brand-new $40+k truck, and probably $20~25k travel trailer.
    Builds a building. Buys several more machines. Can afford to constantly be traveling all over the place. Etc.

    Good for him! But, don't freakin' tell me there is no money in youtube!

    Ave is another. Buys a brand-new $100+k CNC, with absolutely zero need!

    Yet, they all stress that there is no money in making youtube videos. There would be a whole lot more respect if they quit saying that shit.
    Because it obviously is not the reality.
    They don't want you to try as it may take away from their views

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    This bugs me as well. They all say: "there is no money in youtube" and "I don't make hardly anything doing this".

    Yet, like you say, Adam is the perfect example: quits his job and immediately buys a brand-new $40+k truck, and probably $20~25k travel trailer.
    Builds a building. Buys several more machines. Can afford to constantly be traveling all over the place. Etc.

    Good for him! But, don't freakin' tell me there is no money in youtube!

    Ave is another. Buys a brand-new $100+k CNC, with absolutely zero need!

    Yet, they all stress that there is no money in making youtube videos. There would be a whole lot more respect if they quit saying that shit.
    Because it obviously is not the reality.
    There is on the contrary, a shit ton of money to be made with enough followers and sponsors. Look at this, 8 year old kid making (his parents money I'm sure) 26 MILLION dollars last year!

    Ryan Kaji remains YouTube'''s highest-earner making $26 million in 2019

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    For those who think John Saunders (NYC CNC) is too overly enthusiastic, the first 10 seconds of this video might put him into perspective,

    YouTube

    Doesn't seem so bad now imo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob L View Post
    For those who think John Saunders (NYC CNC) is too overly enthusiastic, the first 10 seconds of this video might put him into perspective,

    YouTube

    Doesn't seem so bad now imo.
    I don't even have sound on this computer and 10 seconds in I wanted to mute him.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob L View Post
    For those who think John Saunders (NYC CNC) is too overly enthusiastic, the first 10 seconds of this video might put him into perspective,

    YouTube

    Doesn't seem so bad now imo.
    Not that f'kn twat

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    This bugs me as well. They all say: "there is no money in youtube" and "I don't make hardly anything doing this".

    Yet, like you say, Adam is the perfect example: quits his job and immediately buys a brand-new $40+k truck, and probably $20~25k travel trailer.
    Builds a building. Buys several more machines. Can afford to constantly be traveling all over the place. Etc.

    Good for him! But, don't freakin' tell me there is no money in youtube!

    Ave is another. Buys a brand-new $100+k CNC, with absolutely zero need!

    Yet, they all stress that there is no money in making youtube videos. There would be a whole lot more respect if they quit saying that shit.
    Because it obviously is not the reality.
    I wonder if that new wife of his doesn't have some bucks, Abom that is. His lifestyle changed a lot around the time they got hitched.

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    The folks making a living on Youtube aren't machining companies / individuals who machine stuff though. They first and foremost are media / advertising companies. Don't forget that. Unless you have millions of subscribers it is very difficult to make a living on Youtube revenue alone. How to make real money is:

    1. Through direct payments like Patreon from supporters. And most times in these situations people are paying to be entertained. Instead of paying the cable company $100 a month folks are instead supporting small people who make watchable content they like. I don't think this is a bad thing at all. Here is where the democratization of the televsion industry has been a great thing. I put channels like Clickspring or This Old Tony into this box.
    2. Through direct advertising of products and services. Some folks sign advertising deals with companies outside of Google and make significantly more advertising money over and above what Google pays. This can be very subtle or blatant shilling. Sometimes the Youtube channel simply gets free stuff to advertise (ie free cordless drill if you talk about it - usually smaller channels) or they get a dump truck full of cash. Advertising companies like this because of Google's exceptionally strong analytics. If you have a Youtube channel you know your audience exceptionally well. So you can directly target buyers of your product. I don't particularly like these channels myself. Some people do a better job than others but most of the time I find it a bit "selling out" at best to downright unethical at worst. Personally I see Google ending this practice in the near future. Google is supporting a large infrastructure and is leaving a lot of money on the table here as to my knowledge the channels that do this don't pay Google a piece of the advertising deals they negotiated outside of Google's Adsense program.


    Companies (or individuals) where machining a product or providing a service as their primary source of income who also happen to Youtube / Instagram etc do it as part of a marketing strategy or simply a hobby. Think of engineer Johnny who has a problem or needs something to be machined. All Johnny knows comes from Youtube / Google so it makes sense to direct market to the Johnnies. I see nothing wrong with this either as long as it is tastefully done and generally provides a service to the community in return for some simple advertising. It kind of is like white paper advertising but good businesses know what their customers need. Suburban Tool and others fit into this box.

    Then you have the home shop Harries who just do it for fun and use the pittance of Youtube money to pay for 10% of the tooling they trashed trying to make whatever they were trying to make. This goes back to the original purpose for Youtube in the beginning. Basically individuals posting videos of simple stuff for fun.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob L View Post
    For those who think John Saunders (NYC CNC) is too overly enthusiastic, the first 10 seconds of this video might put him into perspective,

    YouTube

    Doesn't seem so bad now imo.
    "Strange Parts" ~ New to me , hadn't stumbled across that in my interweb "Bubble"

    A few minutes in and riffling through this video and that video on Strange' s channel ,

    I'm like - "Dude" junky 101 - Don't mix your uppers with your downers maaaaan.

    __________________________________________________ __________________________________________________ _____

    * Saunder's Machine Works he's getting better, ~ better is better, but when he says at beginning of nearly each video

    "I LOVE CNC !"... I can seeeee that sadness behind his eyes and wanting to crawl into the corner (fetal position) and occasionally cry and wonder what the hell did "I" / he get myself/ himself into ??? _ Too late now, no turning back , suck it up and carry on... lol

    ** No projection there whatso ever... None , zip nada , nahhh-ahh...

    ~ I definitely have gotten to see (vicariously) a lot of shop floors that I would never have been able to see myself thanks to NYCCNC. "They " let him in as they don't perceive him as a threat and 'We" get the benefit of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by wheelieking71 View Post
    Yet, they all stress that there is no money in making youtube videos. There would be a whole lot more respect if they quit saying that shit.
    Because it obviously is not the reality.
    Answering from my own, personal experience with an average youtube channel:

    If you strictly talk money that comes from Youtube due to advertisment that is either shown before the actual video or as a overlay during a video, its not a lot.
    Sites like socialblade will give you a good idea how much a youtube channel makes that way.
    Stefan Gotteswinter's YouTube Stats (Summary Profile) - Social Blade Stats

    It will give you a wide range for the monthly and yearly income, both very extreme. From talking to people and own experience, the reality is somewhere in the middle to upper two thirds of that range.
    If you break it down an and calculate the hourly rate you would get for shooting the video and editing, I would be about 10x better off, in not doing any video and just work on customer parts.

    Editing a new video takes me probably somewhere in 3..6 hours, depending on how much raw footage I have to go trough (Usually I have about 2..3hours that I edit down into 30 minutes.)
    When that new video goes online, it generates about 50..100€ in the first month and then it goes down for any following month until it stabilizes at about 3..5€ for each month.
    (Of course, the overall monthly income generates increases in general with each added video - But there are huge shifts over the year too - During the summer months it usually drops a bit, December is a very strong month.)

    For me, it all that adds up to "Its fun but not economic from a money standpoint."

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    And now a word about "how well does it pay"....

    Stephan's post illustrates a key point. For most of the channels we talk about, the total money (at least as seen by socialblade) isn't all that much, especially after gear, editing, time, etc. And so a youtube channel might be grossing, say, $300K a year, and one might react with "that's huge money" - but that's REVENUE, not PROFIT. (Anybody think running a CNC shop on $300K gross is a path to great wealth? Yeah, me neither...)

    But there are collateral issues - how many extra orders has fireball tool generated? How many boat owners on cape cod make a beeline for turnwright machine? Or how many ovens does Stan sell as a side effect of his videos and the summer bash? (That's all above and beyond "like to make videos" and "educate people".) [1]

    Then consider MKHBD - OK, maybe he's actually grossing say $1M (middle of socialblade range). Maybe he makes a living off that. Or, given how relatively few videos he does, maybe the real answer is that he's paid very well indeed for say general video work (makes ads for people for corporate event videos or something - I don't know I'm speculating.)

    Linus of Linus tech tips has talked about making a little ad spot, which they roll for some of their sponsors, and which those same sponsors roll in their own media. If they're gross (via socialblade) is say $2M, that sounds like "oh my!" - but wait, there are 12+ people being paid out of that (they show them.) With Canadian taxes. Suddenly $2M doesn't sound all that great. But socialblade probably doesn't know how much they're making with all manner of side deals, videos for other people, etc. (again, I'm speculating.)

    I presume you all realize that at, say, the top of F1, what the key drivers are paid by their teams is real money but small potatoes compared to endorsements they get elsewhere.

    Which all just means that when people say "there's no money in it" they maybe shouldn't be taken literally, but sensibly as in "it works out to $14 per hour" or even "$35 hour".

    [1] This is not unique to youtube. I personally help a charitable org trying to improve some things in the developing world. They don't pay me (they don't have any money.) I make things for them, help with all manner of things, and basically subsidize the effort. Because I enjoy the nature of the work and believe in the goal. Sometimes I have deep knowlege about the problem. Other times I'm the one-eyed man with cataracts leading the utterly blind. Make no mistake, I could get vastly more money going back to a job, and spend less money sitting home playing fortnite.

    So by analogy outright money probably isn't much of a motivator for most of these folks. (I don't know who this-old-tony is, but his writing and editing skills suggest his main source of wealth is somewhere far from youtube.)

    As for "gofundme" - my not-a-lawyer not-an-accoutant do-not-live-in-that-state observation is it's probably technically a gift, on which the receiver does not pay taxes, and which donors don't have tax issues until they get into estate tax funding levels. (The *giver* who gives more than uh $13K per year outside of special cases in theory has to account that against their estate tax base....)

    While a patreon account that's in effect paying any number of history, especially firearms history, channels, is probably effectively income since they're being hired for a job. (But I'm neither a lawyer nor an accoutant.)

    And of course, you can watch, or not watch. Contribute or not. Be influenced for/against or not at all. It's way better than local politics or the like.

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    I just signed up on the forum about 30 minutes ago, and it's mostly because of This Old Tony and Abom79....and those hilarious Brits at Bad Obsession Motorsport. I desperately want to buy a lathe, but could use so much advice. Could someone give me some idea of a fair price for a Logan 1940-2 lathe with a good amount of accessories. There is one for sale about 5 hours from me, and it looks to be in good condition, but is asking $4,000, and all your threads I have looked at list Logans at $1500 tops, presumably for smaller machines, maybe?!?!

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    Quote Originally Posted by plastikdreams View Post
    John saunders is a hack, if you have enough crash clips to make a decent length video in one or 2 years you need to find another hobby.
    I was amazed at that video. Saw way more mishaps in that 2 year compilation than I've seen in all my past 30 years in the trade. They just kind of have that millennial "oh well" thing with a clueless smile about it like Tony Romo always had after a game losing interception or something. Is natural selection no longer in play? Seems like the movie 'Idiocracy' is more of a forward looking documentary. Really kind of scary.

    It's got what plants crave.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryan_machine View Post
    And now a word about "how well does it pay"....

    Stephan's post illustrates a key point. For most of the channels we talk about, the total money (at least as seen by socialblade) isn't all that much, especially after gear, editing, time, etc. And so a youtube channel might be grossing, say, $300K a year, and one might react with "that's huge money" - but that's REVENUE, not PROFIT. (Anybody think running a CNC shop on $300K gross is a path to great wealth? Yeah, me neither...)

    But there are collateral issues - how many extra orders has fireball tool generated? How many boat owners on cape cod make a beeline for turnwright machine? Or how many ovens does Stan sell as a side effect of his videos and the summer bash? (That's all above and beyond "like to make videos" and "educate people".) [1]

    Then consider MKHBD - OK, maybe he's actually grossing say $1M (middle of socialblade range). Maybe he makes a living off that. Or, given how relatively few videos he does, maybe the real answer is that he's paid very well indeed for say general video work (makes ads for people for corporate event videos or something - I don't know I'm speculating.)

    Linus of Linus tech tips has talked about making a little ad spot, which they roll for some of their sponsors, and which those same sponsors roll in their own media. If they're gross (via socialblade) is say $2M, that sounds like "oh my!" - but wait, there are 12+ people being paid out of that (they show them.) With Canadian taxes. Suddenly $2M doesn't sound all that great. But socialblade probably doesn't know how much they're making with all manner of side deals, videos for other people, etc. (again, I'm speculating.)

    I presume you all realize that at, say, the top of F1, what the key drivers are paid by their teams is real money but small potatoes compared to endorsements they get elsewhere.

    Which all just means that when people say "there's no money in it" they maybe shouldn't be taken literally, but sensibly as in "it works out to $14 per hour" or even "$35 hour".

    [1] This is not unique to youtube. I personally help a charitable org trying to improve some things in the developing world. They don't pay me (they don't have any money.) I make things for them, help with all manner of things, and basically subsidize the effort. Because I enjoy the nature of the work and believe in the goal. Sometimes I have deep knowlege about the problem. Other times I'm the one-eyed man with cataracts leading the utterly blind. Make no mistake, I could get vastly more money going back to a job, and spend less money sitting home playing fortnite.

    So by analogy outright money probably isn't much of a motivator for most of these folks. (I don't know who this-old-tony is, but his writing and editing skills suggest his main source of wealth is somewhere far from youtube.)

    As for "gofundme" - my not-a-lawyer not-an-accoutant do-not-live-in-that-state observation is it's probably technically a gift, on which the receiver does not pay taxes, and which donors don't have tax issues until they get into estate tax funding levels. (The *giver* who gives more than uh $13K per year outside of special cases in theory has to account that against their estate tax base....)

    While a patreon account that's in effect paying any number of history, especially firearms history, channels, is probably effectively income since they're being hired for a job. (But I'm neither a lawyer nor an accoutant.)

    And of course, you can watch, or not watch. Contribute or not. Be influenced for/against or not at all. It's way better than local politics or the like.
    I don't know if you checked your math or not, but 2M split between 12 people is roughly 166k. I don't know the Canadian tax system or anything, but even if you pay 50% in 'taxes and/or fees'(?), that is still net of 83k. That is just a little better than my best year grossing 78k!

    edit: And if you factor in that some of these people really like to make videos, and they work at home doing the video editing and such, not a bad deal at all for 80k year

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ozmaniac View Post
    I just signed up on the forum about 30 minutes ago, and it's mostly because of This Old Tony and Abom79....and those hilarious Brits at Bad Obsession Motorsport. I desperately want to buy a lathe, but could use so much advice. Could someone give me some idea of a fair price for a Logan 1940-2 lathe with a good amount of accessories. There is one for sale about 5 hours from me, and it looks to be in good condition, but is asking $4,000, and all your threads I have looked at list Logans at $1500 tops, presumably for smaller machines, maybe?!?!
    you might want to start a new thread just asking about the price and leaving out the intro

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    Quote Originally Posted by bryan_machine View Post
    And now a word about "how well does it pay"....

    Stephan's post illustrates a key point. For most of the channels we talk about, the total money (at least as seen by socialblade) isn't all that much, especially after gear, editing, time, etc. And so a youtube channel might be grossing, say, $300K a year, and one might react with "that's huge money" - but that's REVENUE, not PROFIT. (Anybody think running a CNC shop on $300K gross is a path to great wealth? Yeah, me neither...)

    But there are collateral issues - how many extra orders has fireball tool generated? How many boat owners on cape cod make a beeline for turnwright machine? Or how many ovens does Stan sell as a side effect of his videos and the summer bash? (That's all above and beyond "like to make videos" and "educate people".) [1]

    Then consider MKHBD - OK, maybe he's actually grossing say $1M (middle of socialblade range). Maybe he makes a living off that. Or, given how relatively few videos he does, maybe the real answer is that he's paid very well indeed for say general video work (makes ads for people for corporate event videos or something - I don't know I'm speculating.)

    Linus of Linus tech tips has talked about making a little ad spot, which they roll for some of their sponsors, and which those same sponsors roll in their own media. If they're gross (via socialblade) is say $2M, that sounds like "oh my!" - but wait, there are 12+ people being paid out of that (they show them.) With Canadian taxes. Suddenly $2M doesn't sound all that great. But socialblade probably doesn't know how much they're making with all manner of side deals, videos for other people, etc. (again, I'm speculating.)

    I presume you all realize that at, say, the top of F1, what the key drivers are paid by their teams is real money but small potatoes compared to endorsements they get elsewhere.

    Which all just means that when people say "there's no money in it" they maybe shouldn't be taken literally, but sensibly as in "it works out to $14 per hour" or even "$35 hour".

    [1] This is not unique to youtube. I personally help a charitable org trying to improve some things in the developing world. They don't pay me (they don't have any money.) I make things for them, help with all manner of things, and basically subsidize the effort. Because I enjoy the nature of the work and believe in the goal. Sometimes I have deep knowlege about the problem. Other times I'm the one-eyed man with cataracts leading the utterly blind. Make no mistake, I could get vastly more money going back to a job, and spend less money sitting home playing fortnite.

    So by analogy outright money probably isn't much of a motivator for most of these folks. (I don't know who this-old-tony is, but his writing and editing skills suggest his main source of wealth is somewhere far from youtube.)

    As for "gofundme" - my not-a-lawyer not-an-accoutant do-not-live-in-that-state observation is it's probably technically a gift, on which the receiver does not pay taxes, and which donors don't have tax issues until they get into estate tax funding levels. (The *giver* who gives more than uh $13K per year outside of special cases in theory has to account that against their estate tax base....)

    While a patreon account that's in effect paying any number of history, especially firearms history, channels, is probably effectively income since they're being hired for a job. (But I'm neither a lawyer nor an accoutant.)

    And of course, you can watch, or not watch. Contribute or not. Be influenced for/against or not at all. It's way better than local politics or the like.
    to me those $ 300,000 a year sounds a lot like profit not revenue.
    one could pay a guy $ 1000 a week to just make the video and edit it and still have $ 250,000 at the end of the year.

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    Yeah, if you can't make a decent living off 300k making machining videos, you're an idiot. Sorry, but video equip and software isn't that much $ at the levels we are talking about. It's not filming The Titanic.


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