Machining cast iron cookware - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 47
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    300
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    148
    Likes (Received)
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    What would be the difference in using a stainless steel pan (some with a copper bottom bonded on the outside) rather than Cast iron ?
    The fundamental difference is that the cast iron is porous enough to hold oil within the pan itself. The process of establishing this condition is the "seasoning" referred to above, it involves heat cycling the cast iron with oil present in order to saturate the porous surface with oil. What you get is a sublime non-stick surface on a pan that has enough guts (read: mass) to hold its temperature when food contacts it, which is important for certain culinary techniques. Nothing sears a big slab of meat quite like cast iron.

    Stainless with a copper bottom is good for cooking acidic foods like stuff with a tomato base or lemon juice in it. The copper bottom distributes the heat because stainless is a notoriously poor heat conductor. You'd get terrible hot spots with just plain stainless. Cast iron is not so good with acidic foods because it will negatively impact the seasoning.

    Edit to add: Yes, stainless is sticky. In my experience there isn't that much to be done about it. That's why you'd use it on acidic, saucy foods where that's not a big deal.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,057
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks for the 'splainations.

    I don't use CI as we have plenty of Iron in the water around here.
    So I make eggs every morning, use some olive oil in the pan, seems to be o.k.

    Bare fish (no breading) is a problem, but I started using butter, and minimal heat,
    seems to work best. Otherwise (olive oil) sticking left half the fillet in the pan....

    Chicken breast marinated in Salad dressing, I just dump it all in (chicken and excess marinade) boiling keeps temps down, easier to cook just right (not over nor under)
    and doesn't stick at all.

  3. Likes Steven-Canada liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    413
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    978
    Likes (Received)
    243

    Default

    We have the old cast iron pans

    I've screwed up a few - when you over heat the pan and smoke ukp the house, do NOT hitit with water to stop the smoke.
    Just put it inside the oven for it to cool down.

    Hitting it with water will heat shrink it and hump the bottom.


    I've noticed that they are all sold rough and unfinished.

    Mill with cup wheel to do the bottom, then invert the cup wheel if the wheel and side angles match.
    IF the pan is thick enough to do that.

    so far it's still easier to buy the oldies.



    If you have an old carbon crustie, put it in the oven on self cleaning mode.

    Normal cleaning, - Don't use any soap, just a stainless scrubber pad, hot water and table salt.
    It's incredible how salt removes the crap without screwing up the seasoning.

    Butter and lard are the best seasoning fat.
    Oils seem to get thick and sticky

  5. Likes Dumpster_diving, Bobw liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    336
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    My parents have some ancient Wagner pans, ground smooth by the manufacturer. My wife picked out some Lodge pans around the time we were married, and being rough cast they were a PITA with sticking. After a year or so I took an angle grinder with a flap disc to the first, the second I roughed in on the mill then cleaned up with the angle grinder. Both have been substantially better since. Every now and then someone will do something silly like make tomato sauce in one and strip the seasoning, so we've gotten good at redoing it. We've tried a couple things, but simply frying some bacon or sausage in them seems to work the best, and very quickly. With one or two breakfasts worth of bacon they won't have that smooth uniform black look yet, but they will be back to their full non sticking glory.
    Wash with a steel pad/mail/whatever. If there's a ton of grease a single wipe after with residual soap from something else makes cleaning it faster.

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    300
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    148
    Likes (Received)
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven-Canada View Post
    Clarified Butter and lard are the best seasoning fat.
    Oils seem to get thick and sticky
    Fixed that for you. Butter will scorch/burn because of residual milk solids and/or moisture. Clarified butter will get the job done. Lard is of course the traditional fat for the job. Oils can be made to work, but to prevent them getting sticky, a thinner layer should be used. Thinner being "wiped on with a paper towel" thin. Multiple seasonings may be needed in that case. Temps as high as you can manage with the applied hydrocarbon of choice: butter, olive oil, canola oil, clarified butter, lard, in that order.

  8. Likes Steven-Canada liked this post
  9. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Massachusetts
    Posts
    319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    102

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    What would be the difference in using a stainless steel pan (some with a copper bottom bonded on the outside) rather than Cast iron ?
    Thermal mass. And the fact that even a red heat does not destroy an iron pan.

  10. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    1,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1013
    Likes (Received)
    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    What would be the difference in using a stainless steel pan (some with a copper bottom bonded on the outside) rather than Cast iron ?
    The impetus for me to change to CI was looking at an unappealing grey steak grilled in a SS pan, it had every appearance of being boiled, yes I prefer grilling over an open flame, but at neg F temps that is not an option. CI pans give a browned cooked look to just about everything, like Mom used to make

  11. Likes digger doug, TeachMePlease, 3512B liked this post
  12. #28
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Central Ohio USA
    Posts
    3,812
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    74
    Likes (Received)
    1713

    Default

    I've got a couple to season after smoothing, and I'm planning on avacado oil for the seasoning. Reportedly a high temp alternative.

  13. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,057
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post
    Thermal mass. And the fact that even a red heat does not destroy an iron pan.
    I'm sorry, but cooking has yet to approach those conditions....

    "Thermal mass" ???? when I shut off the gas, I want it to stop cooking NOW...not after ignition.

  14. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Sunny South West Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10555
    Likes (Received)
    3211

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    I'm sorry, but cooking has yet to approach those conditions....

    "Thermal mass" ???? when I shut off the gas, I want it to stop cooking NOW...not after ignition.

    Yeah, but when I get the pan and oil hot, and throw in an inch and a half thick steak, I want the pan to STAY hot, and sear that steak. And I want it to keep providing the same heat for the 2 minutes the steak will sit in the same spot. And then when I flip the steak, I want the other side to get the exact same amount of heat, and get the same sear on on it.

    When I want something to stop cooking, I take it out of the pan, simple enough.

    I can cook a better tasting steak on my cast iron than I can on my grill, I've got my system down perfectly. 2 minutes per side, and a ten minute rest while tented with foil, and you get a perfect medium rare on an inch thick steak. Adjust by feel if the steak is thicker or thinner. Add butter during the rest, if you're feeling fancy.

  15. #31
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Spokane, WA
    Posts
    633
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    124

    Default

    When properly seasoned and maintained, nothing sticks to good cast iron. Never use soap. After washing, dry immediately and always give them another wipe with bacon grease prior to storing.

    Griswold has been the gold standard in iron cookery. Over fifty years, I've gotten a good example in each increment of frying pans from #3 through #10, a couple of griddles, a couple of Dutch ovens, a chicken fryer and a couple of cornstick pans.

    As mentioned,the one thing cast iron won't do well is cook acidic sauces, especially those with tomatoes or vinegar based. I do the saute in iron and then switch to stainless steel when the tomato and/or vinegar is added.

    And yes, I visited the Lodge foundry in Pittsburg, TN and bought one of those boat-anchor-heavy grill pans with the raised ribs. The finish was so rough the food would stick to it and it was impossible to clean; it would rip a cleaning pad to shreds.

    I spent way too much time hand sanding the ribs smooth and then seasoning it. The end result is a pan with so much mass it takes longer to heat up, then because the space between the ribs reduces heat transfer, does not cook as quickly or sear as well as a flat bottom pan. It gets used occasionally, but I should send it to Goodwill and let go of the sunk cost in labor.

    jack vines, who needs a Griswold #8 Dutch oven lid

    P.S. To heck with plastic Instapots! Real men use a real cast aluminum pressure cooker; but that's another off-topic thread.

    j.v.

  16. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Illinois, USA
    Posts
    658
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    190

    Default

    My daughter bought a Field cast iron skillet. They do a beautiful job, and it's a beautiful cooking skillet, but they are expensive at $125 plus.

    Every time I've found the nice, old vintage cookware for sale, it's either cracked, or costs a fortune. I'm not a collector, so I don't care if I have Griswold, Erie, etc...

    I only cook on cast iron. I have all Lodge pans. I buy the rough (new) ones, and I have machined them myself. I have 2 12" skillets, a 10" low side egg pan, a 10" square "grill", and a 2 burner griddle, as well as a couple dutch ovens. I burned the Lodge seasoning off using my oven on the clean cycle, and then do the machining. When I'm done, a random orbital sander with 120 grit leaves just enough "bite" for the seasoning to hold to, and just keep applying several coats of seasoning, in the beginning, until you build it up. I do 3 rounds in the oven at 400 degrees for 2 hours each, allowing it to cool fully. You get out what you put in to it.

    Cook lots of bacon and fried potato's if you want to build your seasoning quickly. Also, never ever ever clean with soap. It ruins the seasoning. I clean with a plastic scraper, a little warm water, and a Lodge scrub brush. Wipe with a paper towel until clean (no "brown" on the paper), heat to dry, and wipe with an oily (food safe....not 10W30) rag, and heat again to dry. I use Crisco. My daughter uses Flaxseed oil. She's a health nut, and a nurse, so.......

    My cookware is now awesome, and I don't have a pan I paid more than $19 for, except for the dutch ovens. Those are pricey, but worth it. Spare ribs are in the dutch oven, right now, as I'm typing this, on a slow 3 hour cook. They will be delicious, along with carrots and green beans with olive oil and seasoning, cooked in a cast iron pan, and garlic mashed potato's. Yum!

    If you haven't tasted food properly prepared in cast iron cookware, then you're in for a treat. Between the smoker, my charcoal grill, and cast iron prepared meals, i'm not going to live to be 100, but I'm gonna die happy!

  17. #33
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,057
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PackardV8 View Post

    Griswold has been the gold standard in iron cookery. Over fifty years, I've gotten a good example in each increment of frying pans from #3 through #10, a couple of griddles, a couple of Dutch ovens, a chicken fryer and a couple of cornstick pans.

    jack vines, who needs a Griswold #8 Dutch oven lid

    .
    Try here:
    Photos/Listings | wilersauctionhouse

    Note the listing for this Friday: "...Griswold #10 dutch oven with trivet, griswold small logo #6 skillet, Wagner #3 skillet, Wagner #6 skillet two Griswold #8 dutch oven pots(no lids) three griswold dampers,..."

    Must be a conspiracy eh ?

  18. #34
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Pillager, MN
    Posts
    5,731
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1868
    Likes (Received)
    5226

    Default

    I have some Lodge pans..................Angle grinder with a flap disc followed by an orbital sander...........perfect pre-seasoned cook surface in less than 15 minutes.

    Can you get Durabar in plate? A chunk 1"x12"x20" would make a heck of a griddle........................

  19. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    Sunny South West Florida, USA
    Posts
    2,802
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10555
    Likes (Received)
    3211

    Default

    So how smooth is "smooth" on a cast iron to you guys? I bought this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 when it was a deal of the day for like $12 or something stupid cheap like that. I've had it 2 years, it's plenty smooth for me, and nothing sticks to it. How does it appear compared to your smoothed out/higher quality Lodge pans?

  20. #36
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,057
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by david n View Post
    I have some Lodge pans..................Angle grinder with a flap disc followed by an orbital sander...........perfect pre-seasoned cook surface in less than 15 minutes.

    Can you get Durabar in plate? A chunk 1"x12"x20" would make a heck of a griddle........................
    Heck....just source some D-2 plate.....

  21. #37
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    300
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    148
    Likes (Received)
    175

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    So how smooth is "smooth" on a cast iron to you guys? I bought this one: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1 when it was a deal of the day for like $12 or something stupid cheap like that. I've had it 2 years, it's plenty smooth for me, and nothing sticks to it. How does it appear compared to your smoothed out/higher quality Lodge pans?
    I have an old old Lodge 10" pan (from the scrap heap), and a Le Creuset 8" (from thrift shop) and both are significantly smoother than that one. The Le Creuset has a slight "orange peel" like texture, and the old Lodge is dead smooth. I never need anything more than two rounds of warm water and a scouring pad (while the pan is still hot, it becomes hot water rather quickly), and then I paper towel dry before the pan cools. Wife gets mad if I use real towels on account of the residual brownness. The last of the water evaporates quickly, and then I'm all done.

  22. #38
    Join Date
    Mar 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    460
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    86
    Likes (Received)
    245

    Default

    A few years back I got a spectacular Griswold 14" skillet (small logo) at an estate sale. Prices on the cast iron in the house were pretty high. Fortunately it was out in a workshop, filled with junk.

    It is a great casting, and surprisingly light for the size. Slight gotcha - it is a 'spinner' - there is a low spot in the center of the cooking surface due to some past thermal trauma. I have wondered if there is a way to correct that. It is probably more of a theoretical question because I'm not going to risk cracking it.

  23. #39
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Hatch, NM Chile capital of the WORLD
    Posts
    9,034
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13823
    Likes (Received)
    10686

    Default

    Hi, My name is Bob, and I have a cast iron pan addiction..

    I think I have a little bit of everything.. Every size square pan,
    every size round pan, dutch ovens, several styles of corn bread pans,
    griddle pans and even a cast iron muffin tin...

    My old lady points out every single cast iron pan when we go to the flea market,
    and then makes fun of me since the pantry is loaded with cast iron that I don't use.

    I don't have much to add to the conversation, but I wanted to ask if any of you have
    discovered those induction plates yet... They work with great with my cast iron..
    Awesome temperature control.. You want 350, you get 350. Braising at 205 for perfect
    stew meat... Good heat distribution, and on *Nuclear*.. 'Sear' I swear it gets hotter
    than I can get a pan on my stovetop. And the best part, it doesn't heat your kitchen
    up in the summer like the stove top does..

    Best investment I've ever made.

  24. Likes Philabuster liked this post
  25. #40
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    BFE Nevada/San Marcos Tx
    Posts
    1,142
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1013
    Likes (Received)
    595

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TeachMePlease View Post
    So how smooth is "smooth" on a cast iron to you guys? I bought this one:
    Hard to judge from a pic, but that looks like a crinkle surface. The old skillets are very smooth, I have a couple of Griswold, but most of my collection is no name stuff, most likely Wagner and BSR, I prefer them because of the lighter castings.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •