Machining cast iron cookware - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 25 of 25
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    280
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    138
    Likes (Received)
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    What would be the difference in using a stainless steel pan (some with a copper bottom bonded on the outside) rather than Cast iron ?
    The fundamental difference is that the cast iron is porous enough to hold oil within the pan itself. The process of establishing this condition is the "seasoning" referred to above, it involves heat cycling the cast iron with oil present in order to saturate the porous surface with oil. What you get is a sublime non-stick surface on a pan that has enough guts (read: mass) to hold its temperature when food contacts it, which is important for certain culinary techniques. Nothing sears a big slab of meat quite like cast iron.

    Stainless with a copper bottom is good for cooking acidic foods like stuff with a tomato base or lemon juice in it. The copper bottom distributes the heat because stainless is a notoriously poor heat conductor. You'd get terrible hot spots with just plain stainless. Cast iron is not so good with acidic foods because it will negatively impact the seasoning.

    Edit to add: Yes, stainless is sticky. In my experience there isn't that much to be done about it. That's why you'd use it on acidic, saucy foods where that's not a big deal.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    14,816
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Thanks for the 'splainations.

    I don't use CI as we have plenty of Iron in the water around here.
    So I make eggs every morning, use some olive oil in the pan, seems to be o.k.

    Bare fish (no breading) is a problem, but I started using butter, and minimal heat,
    seems to work best. Otherwise (olive oil) sticking left half the fillet in the pan....

    Chicken breast marinated in Salad dressing, I just dump it all in (chicken and excess marinade) boiling keeps temps down, easier to cook just right (not over nor under)
    and doesn't stick at all.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Ontario
    Posts
    409
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    956
    Likes (Received)
    242

    Default

    We have the old cast iron pans

    I've screwed up a few - when you over heat the pan and smoke ukp the house, do NOT hitit with water to stop the smoke.
    Just put it inside the oven for it to cool down.

    Hitting it with water will heat shrink it and hump the bottom.


    I've noticed that they are all sold rough and unfinished.

    Mill with cup wheel to do the bottom, then invert the cup wheel if the wheel and side angles match.
    IF the pan is thick enough to do that.

    so far it's still easier to buy the oldies.



    If you have an old carbon crustie, put it in the oven on self cleaning mode.

    Normal cleaning, - Don't use any soap, just a stainless scrubber pad, hot water and table salt.
    It's incredible how salt removes the crap without screwing up the seasoning.

    Butter and lard are the best seasoning fat.
    Oils seem to get thick and sticky

  4. Likes Dumpster_diving, Bobw liked this post
  5. #24
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    113

    Default

    My parents have some ancient Wagner pans, ground smooth by the manufacturer. My wife picked out some Lodge pans around the time we were married, and being rough cast they were a PITA with sticking. After a year or so I took an angle grinder with a flap disc to the first, the second I roughed in on the mill then cleaned up with the angle grinder. Both have been substantially better since. Every now and then someone will do something silly like make tomato sauce in one and strip the seasoning, so we've gotten good at redoing it. We've tried a couple things, but simply frying some bacon or sausage in them seems to work the best, and very quickly. With one or two breakfasts worth of bacon they won't have that smooth uniform black look yet, but they will be back to their full non sticking glory.
    Wash with a steel pad/mail/whatever. If there's a ton of grease a single wipe after with residual soap from something else makes cleaning it faster.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Michigan
    Posts
    280
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    138
    Likes (Received)
    159

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Steven-Canada View Post
    Clarified Butter and lard are the best seasoning fat.
    Oils seem to get thick and sticky
    Fixed that for you. Butter will scorch/burn because of residual milk solids and/or moisture. Clarified butter will get the job done. Lard is of course the traditional fat for the job. Oils can be made to work, but to prevent them getting sticky, a thinner layer should be used. Thinner being "wiped on with a paper towel" thin. Multiple seasonings may be needed in that case. Temps as high as you can manage with the applied hydrocarbon of choice: butter, olive oil, canola oil, clarified butter, lard, in that order.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •