Machinist VS. Welder - Page 5
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  1. #81
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    Both have their place, they intermingle but they are different skills. Akin to saying a Carpenter is more skilled than a Mason.

  2. #82
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    I have to appreciate the guy bringing up this old thread, something must have hit a nerve?
    I've been into machining my whole working life but decided a few years ago to learn a little about welding for some specific projects at home. With an old Airco AC-DC stick welder and some supplies, a little practice and a lot of questions from people I respect with constructive criticism thrown in I got pretty good at sticking steel together. Welds aren't pretty enough for commercial purposes but strong enough for the job at hand. It's a real eye opener how much easier it is to put things together without the need to machine every detail, squaring parts, oversize material for milling gussets/stiffeners in the pieces, drilling and tapping bolt holes that have to align perfectly with a mating part, really opened up another way of getting a job done and still turning out right.
    As far as that fellow that thinks all machinists are is button pushers; might want to work in a few more shops with different classes of work before spilling his opinion? A lot of time was spent making things in use today without any computer input and no welding required.
    Dan

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    Quote Originally Posted by gary-sc View Post
    I'm a TIG welder first and foremost, so it must be the relatively small amount of machining I do that makes me hate myself sometimes?

    Both are great skills and trades and both have their button pushers, their craftsman and everything in between.
    Truth.

    Some guys have jobs welding because the trained chimps kept running away from the fire. Others have some mad skills!

    All kinds around. Both in welding and machine shops.

    Now, lets don't get started picking away at them what understand wood!

    I hate wood. But it burns way better in my stove than metal chips or slag!

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  5. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ziggy2 View Post
    Not to sound unkind but as your first post here, you are coming across as being full of yourself.

    Your attitude exemplifies the welder/machinist-cat/dog relationship that is present in industry.

    It is good to have pride in our skills and the quality of work that we do however your post indicates youth with little knowledge and understanding about the other trades.

    Both trades, welding and machining require specific skill and knowledge sets that are often not appreciated by a person not in the trade.

    Your example of the welding of thermocouple leads is rather amusing in that that is an excellent application to apply welding automation to. The only reason why you were doing it is that there is not sufficient volume and probable site location issues to make an automated process applicable.

    It is just as likely that a person can become a highly skilled welder by purchasing a $100 welder from HF or becoming a machinist by spending $3000 on a converted HF mill. Not going to happen in either application. There is much more to just messing around in a garage to get the skill set for trade mastery.

    I would suggest that you develop some humility and you might be surprised how much you have not learned yet.
    Besides some humility, it would be good to look at the dates on a thread before opening one in which to boast of one's capabilities.

    Heck, maybe even start a new thread.

    I'm just sayin'


  6. #85
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    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post

    I hate wood. But it burns way better in my stove than metal chips or slag!
    Just means you need to machine more magnesium.

    (An iron/aluminum mix works pretty good too. Or Ti, or zirconium, or...)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Milland View Post
    Just means you need to machine more magnesium.

    (An iron/aluminum mix works pretty good too. Or Ti, or zirconium, or...)
    I like the White, Ti fires.

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    I suspect "iamgod" above is young and has not yet had sufficient life experience. I think there is a very fine line between being full of one's self and being full of shit.

    I am a retired commercial / industrial photographer. Over my 40 odd year career saw many wondrous things in many different plants and industries. I have a great admiration for all the really good skilled people of all trades and professions.

    I photographed a welder at a polyester plant in SC many years ago putting piping and fixtures on a pressure vessel. He ran a bead around a one inch SS pipe -TIG. I took a look and commented that you could cut that out and use it for a wedding ring. It was beautiful. He just smiled. And ran another bead.

    Paul

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  10. #88
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    I don't understand why, don't all machinists know how to weld? I mean, how else are we supposed to mount a vise to the mill table? Wood screws?

    Doc.


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    Here's his pappy "Hucklebuck":



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    Quote Originally Posted by Terry Keeley View Post
    Here's his pappy "Hucklebuck":
    And his grand daddy....None other than Noah, with the best arc:
    Bill Cosby - Noah - YouTube

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    To be fair, Tool & Die Makers think both welders and machinists are not "far from the trees."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rewt View Post
    To be fair, Tool & Die Makers think both welders and machinists are not "far from the trees."
    My neighbor was a Tool & Die guy, I visited his shop.

    They were grinding to 20 millionths. They had to selective stack 5 parts
    together and measure the stack, now forever as one (no interchange).

    He was grinding EDM carbons, and said he made 12 for each part, 4 rough,
    4 mid, and 4 finish.

    Said in the whole week, he removed .004 of material.

    I said "I can't wear that much brylcreme".....

    It takes a certain kind of person to do that kind of work.

    But he doesn't doo what I do either.

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    It makes no sense to place one trade higher than another, Worse yet, calling yourself a god and boasting about it.

    "In every rank, or great or small, Tis industry supports us all."
    John Gay.

    "The laborer is worthy of his hire".
    Holy Bible - Luke Ch. 10, 7.

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    The welder reminds me of the time when the shop owner's kids got on the forum and stirred up a bunch of crap a couple years back. I won't call him a masterbaiter, because he wasn't very subtle.

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    Give it up for the Godz of rock & roll:
    The Godz - Gotta Keep A Runnin - YouTube

  19. #96
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    Eleven years have past since I posted in this thread and my welding still looks ugly, but the jobs I have done have held up. I welded a tow hitch receiver on a friend's sand buggy, thank God you have to crawl under the car to see them. I welded metal framing sides on a trailer I used to move, I ground those welds and filled the occasional burn through with auto body filler, then painted. A piece snapped off a turret lock down on a Hardinge HC, welded that back on and it has held up. I can't make a nice bead to save my life, and end up with slag all over the place.

    The machining has went down hill in 11 years a little but in a good way. I used to go overkill on the appearance on personal jobs, pride in workmanship even if it would never be seen again even by me or anyone else and ugly finish or burrs would not effect function or durability. I had to make a custom sleeve to patch some crappy Orangeburg pipe last weekend. 10 years ago I could have never installed and buried it in the ground with a 125 finish on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    Eleven years have past since I posted in this thread and my welding still looks ugly, but the jobs I have done have held up. I welded a tow hitch receiver on a friend's sand buggy, thank God you have to crawl under the car to see them. I welded metal framing sides on a trailer I used to move, I ground those welds and filled the occasional burn through with auto body filler, then painted. A piece snapped off a turret lock down on a Hardinge HC, welded that back on and it has held up. I can't make a nice bead to save my life, and end up with slag all over the place.

    The machining has went down hill in 11 years a little but in a good way. I used to go overkill on the appearance on personal jobs, pride in workmanship even if it would never be seen again even by me or anyone else and ugly finish or burrs would not effect function or durability. I had to make a custom sleeve to patch some crappy Orangeburg pipe last weekend. 10 years ago I could have never installed and buried it in the ground with a 125 finish on it.
    I think you need to try 1/8" 7104 on A.C.
    Push that rod in there tight, angled slightly, you will
    feel it eat the parent metal. Keep an eye for the sides
    to wet out is all.

    It will just about run itself.

    Flat, fillet, upside down, all runs about the same.

    Can be runs sans helmet in a pinch.

    Vertical up, the slag dam is like having a copper trowel
    in your other hand.
    Don't mind the pool spilling on the floor a wee bit.

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  23. #98
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    Welder: "Thousandths of WHAT?"

    Machinist: "One eighth inch off and you call that straight?"

    Metal Craftsman: Measure once. Cut once. Weld. Mill. Done! And it is better than just welded and stronger and less expensive than machined from solid.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    In the U.K. we have a saying - " If you can piss your name in the snow you can weld ". Regards Tyrone.
    Only if you know jack all about welding and cant weld.

  25. #100
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    In the U.K. we have a saying - " If you can piss your name in the snow you can weld ". Regards Tyrone.
    My contractor friend says
    "If you can't finish High school, you can finish cement"

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