Maglev train, Shanghai - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by DMF_TomB View Post
    .
    .
    you need a good thick concrete foundation for stable tracks. normally laying long lasting stable rail road tracks is what takes the longest time and greatest expense. you cant go fast on wavy tracks
    .
    freight dont object to a bumpy ride. people get sea sick on long bumpy rides
    There is NO concrete of ANY kind involved in railroad lines.
    Not under, not on top, not near.

    It's called "Ballast" the stone underneath the wooden ties (brits call them "sleepers")
    It works with the ties, plates, clips and whatever else as a system.
    It get's removed, cleaned ,graded, and replaced, and it's a bit more technical than you would think.

    Freight can't run fast on wavy track just like amtrak can't.

    FWIW Amtrak normally does right around 100 mph on "freight" tracks, not just their own rails.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    There is NO concrete of ANY kind involved in railroad lines.
    Not under, not on top, not near.

    It's called "Ballast" the stone underneath the wooden ties (brits call them "sleepers")
    It works with the ties, plates, clips and whatever else as a system.
    It get's removed, cleaned ,graded, and replaced, and it's a bit more technical than you would think.

    Freight can't run fast on wavy track just like amtrak can't.

    FWIW Amtrak normally does right around 100 mph on "freight" tracks, not just their own rails.
    i saw a lot of concrete used on Chinese rails. i saw no wood

  3. #23
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    i always get a laugh when people from Western countries say something is always done certain ways when 1.6 billion people can do things quite different called by different names and what is normal and expected in one country can be unheard of and never seen in another country.
    .
    i have taken many train trips in China. usually you go city to city. bus ride or train ride sometimes more room on the train. but buses obviously can go to more smaller out of the way small towns. never had any problems with Chinese train rides.
    .
    that maglift in Shanghai is train from the airport which is far from the city. i wasnt aware it being used for anything else but airport trips. i took a ride on it once. whats to say it was a relatively fast train ride. i had heard they were extending the tracks. last time i rode it was maybe 2002 ? not sure exact year. i remember a lot of concrete being used for the train tracks. or rather overhead rails ?? in spots. like subway. long time ago not sure if all for maglift or some for regular train like subway
    .
    i didnt take a lot of picture of trains, planes, electrical power plants as certain areas military police dont like picture taking

  4. #24
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    picture of concrete overhead road for cars and trains. not sure the proper name for them
    .
    one picture taken from train or bus i forget. you take pictures of countryside on long train rides but how many pictures can anybody take
    .
    i remember being on a bridge over 20 ? kilometers long. couldnt see much all fog or smog most of the way. on a long bridge seems like it was over 1/2 hour easily.
    .
    picture of regular train station in China. i forget which one
    .
    picture of smaller Chinese bridge. i went over it every day to work from the hotel in the city. i took a special bus just for factory workers
    .
    i was told any military police dont take pictures. they had guy with army rifle at bridge everyday. i didnt ask why. guy standing guard with full length army rifle i tend to walk the other way
    .
    i remember being on a truck and being stopped at the bridge. driver did not have his truck license on him and was arrested. his employer had to get his truck driver license and bring it to the police to get the driver out of jail
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chinesebridge.jpg   chinesebridgeroad.jpg   chinaroad.jpg   trainstation.jpg   chinabridge.jpg  


  5. #25
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    Concrete ties, one supplier among many:

    CXT Concrete Ties

    Speed is a bit harder to refute, since both the Association of American Railroads and the Federal Railroad Administration have taken all their maps with different class track down since 911. No sense letting the terrorists know where they can find fast trains, I guess.

    But I am unaware of anyplace outside Amtrak's Northeast Corridor where they run any faster than 90, and while the Santa Fe used to also run trailer train service at 90, I'm under the impression that since the merger with the Burlington Northern, that has been reduced to 80 to save on track maintenance costs.

    Two things limit train speed in the US today: Unless the track is equipped with the new, still being implemented Positive Train Control signal equipment or an older grandfathered system that 1) displays the signals in the locomotive cab, and 2) will automatically initiate a brake application if need be, train speed is limited to 79 MPH by Federal law.

    Secondly is the FRA "class" of the track. The maximum allowable speed on FRA "class 5" track is 80 MPH for freight and 90 MPH for passenger trains. The FRA classes go up to class 9, IIRC. but I found a statement from the FRA web site that says that other than in the northeast, class 6 is reserved for future "high speed" trains.

    Ah, here we go, linky:

    http://www.jgmes.com/webstart/librar..._fra_track.htm

    You can make of it what you will, but railroaders have been known to exaggerate when boasting about speed.

    Dennis

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    There is NO concrete of ANY kind involved in railroad lines.
    Not under, not on top, not near.

    It's called "Ballast" the stone underneath the wooden ties (brits call them "sleepers")
    It works with the ties, plates, clips and whatever else as a system.
    It get's removed, cleaned ,graded, and replaced, and it's a bit more technical than you would think.

    Freight can't run fast on wavy track just like amtrak can't.

    FWIW Amtrak normally does right around 100 mph on "freight" tracks, not just their own rails.
    I don't know about the US, but in Europe noone has been laying tracks using wooden ties/sleepers for decades. All ties/sleepers are concrete. The tracks are supplied as sections with two rails and all the ties already mounted (a bit like Märklin model railways :-).
    A section is around 30 m long, gets put in place on the ballast and is welded to the previous section. A machine then runs over the track and redistributes/compresses the ballast.

  7. #27
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    like i said just cause all you see in your country is wooden sleepers dont mean the rest of the world does the same.
    .
    China usually builds stuff like roads, bridges, great wall to last a long time. Ceramics and Concrete used a lot
    .
    if you got rice paddies they typically got concrete roads as they need a place to put rice so it can dry out. and if it was gravel rice get mixed with gravel so smooth concrete roads are used.
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    picture on concrete house floor boards. concrete poured around pipe. they set down for house floors and it will last almost forever.
    .
    concrete buildings. some done with wheel barrels, brick with concrete stucco but newer buildings are steel reenforce concrete.
    .
    cement mixer for powered scoop thats in hole in dirt to make loading thousands of heavy bags easier.
    .
    China got a mix of very modern and very old methods for doing just about everything. quite often as a American from a small city of 200,000 i was amazed at what i saw done in cities of 1,000,000 to 20,000,000
    ......more a country boy and city boy thing. big cities often do things different
    .
    wasnt unusual for some buildings to be over 1000 years old. the China canal system for farm irrigation and shipping goods by canal boats is extremely old.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails chinafarm_concreteroad_chickens.jpg   chinafarmhousefloor.jpg   chinabuilding.jpg   chinabuildings.jpg   cementmixer.jpg  


  8. #28
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    The Maglev is only from downtown Shanghai to the airport. Last I was there and wanted to take it, not running due technical difficulties.

    jack vines

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    maglev train was expensive and taxi was cheaper if i remember correctly. i took it once just to see what it was like. not many people on the maglev train.
    .
    subway train thats different. that is always busy in Shanghai

  10. #30
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    BART Trains in the San Francisco area the elevated parts are long solid concrete bridge beams with the tracks sitting on rubber pads then bolted direct to the concrete, no ties of any kind. Designed in the early 1960's. Much of the ground level stuff is concrete ties on ballast.
    Bill D

    http://static.panoramio.com/photos/large/3769112.jpg


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