Matsuura MC-800VF HP, RPC?
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    Default Matsuura MC-800VF HP, RPC?

    Looking at purchasing a 1996 Matsuura MC-800VF.

    Was wondering what the HP is? It has an 8000 rpm spindle and elsewhere in the specs is says 37 kVa. I tried converting this to HP and came up with about 25HP. Is this close to correct?

    What would be the minimum RPC I could get away with? Not really going to be running huge cuts/production.

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    37 KVA is 154 amps at 240 single phase.

    Realistically, that machine will probably run fine on 60 amp 3 phase fuses which equates to roughly 100 amps single phase. Bare minimum I'd try to run it on would be a 30 HP RPC, but a 40 or 50HP would be a safe bet IMO.

    Where you will see the biggest currect draw is spindle acceleration while also doing a 2 or 3 axis move at full rapids. You can lower the spindle accel in the drive parameters to some extent and leave rapids at 50% if you have to.

    The very first thing I would do is check that the transformer feeding your service is big enough to handle this plus the average load of whatever else is happening. I would want a transformer rated at 40 KVA or more. Less might work, but not if you have 10 or 20 KVA. It ain't happening. Aluminum wire is also an issue in many cases. Aluminum connections just won't pass the current after they age and corrode a bit.

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    It's a 200amp service, brand new transformer on the pole at the corner of the 1 acre. No other customers on that transformer. It is aluminum wire to my pole then copper from there.

    What HP do you think this spindle is? Looking at the specs again it says 173 ft lbs Torque

    I'm probably going to reduce the rapids anyway but I think I'll take your recommendation on going above minimum because I may be running a 3 phase air compressor at the same time.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Duncan View Post
    It's a 200amp service, brand new transformer on the pole at the corner of the 1 acre. No other customers on that transformer. It is aluminum wire to my pole then copper from there.

    What HP do you think this spindle is?

    I'm probably going to reduce the rapids anyway but I think I'll take your recommendation on going above minimum because I may be running a 3 phase air compressor at the same time.
    200 amp service means jack shit. If the transformer is new it probably still has the sticker on it so get out your binoculars and read what KVA it is. A lot of 200 amp services have a 10 KVA transformer. That's enough to run your water heater, dryer and a crock pot.

    Looks up the machine. I'm sure you can find all you want about the spindle HP. The KVA of the machine is way more than the spindle. I would guess 15 or 20 HP for the spindle, but you should be able to find the spec easy enough if it matters.

    Don't put a 3 phase compressor on the same RPC as a CNC unless it has a soft start or VFD. The start surge is huge on a compressor and will brown out cnc controls easily.

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    Been searching for the HP specs and getting different numbers from 10hp to 30hp. I guess it's irrelevant because it makes sense like you say you have to look at total load, spindle, rapids etc.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    I would want a transformer rated at 40 KVA or more. Less might work, but not if you have 10 or 20 KVA. It ain't happening. Aluminum wire is also an issue in many cases. Aluminum connections just won't pass the current after they age and corrode a bit.
    It's a 25kVa transformer, so guessing this is too marginal even when reducing rapids etc.


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