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  1. #1
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    Default Metal building cost

    We are looking at a piece of property in Hutchinson to build a shop on. The shop would be a small scale seed oil crushing plant. Preliminary estimates of 5-6000 feet under roof and one or more lean to overhangs.

    What is a realistic price for a metal building with a slab floor, nothing fancy.

    Steve

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    Here in north Texas, a 30'x40', 10' sidewall, 1 personel door and a 10' roll up door runs about 13K$ turnkey. Sidewall height, site challenges and options will make that number float.

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    Hard to say. Have you tried getting some local quotes? Got any tall equipment that needs vertical clearance? Extra height is an adder for any building. DO you need overhead crane service for maintentnce, etc? Electrical service? Plumbing and drainage?

    Can't just put up a building nowadays. Gotta cover all the bases. When the volume of paper equals the volume of the structure you're done and can move in.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forrest Addy View Post
    Hrd to say. Have you tried getting some local quites? Got any tall equipment that needs vertical clearance? Crane service for maintentnce, etc. Electrical service? Plumbing and drainage?

    Can't just put up a building nowadays. Gotta cover all the bases.
    We have some requirements but, I want to get an idea of the basic shell. The height will be 16' at the eaves min. The slab would be 6" We don't have any crane speced; the materials will be transferred by auger, conveyor lines and, piping.

    Steve

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    My brother put up a shop thats 60' X 100" insulated . 8" floors. 3 big electrical doors , 10 windows and two man doors a bathroom and and small office, 3 30X30' concrete pads outside the big doors for $150,000. that was 15 years ago.

    That was cheap part, it was the 30,000 for septic system, water was $5,000 to hook up. the transformers on the power poles where $29,000. lighting was $10,000 to work good as a machine shop and not be dark like a dungeon. then the main electrical inside was crazy. All total it was $330,000 to open the doors and get to work. that includes 2 acres of land.

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    Quote Originally Posted by cvairwerks View Post
    Here in north Texas, a 30'x40', 10' sidewall, 1 personel door and a 10' roll up door runs about 13K$ turnkey. Sidewall height, site challenges and options will make that number float.
    cvariwerks, who did your building?

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    Rex: Haven't had one done yet, just noting what I see advertised in various papers and magazines. From what I can glean, they are doing weld up type installations, 4" slabs and no isulation.

    I'm looking at putitng up a 40'x60' with a 20' peak if I can get it through the variance process. We're limited to a % footprint of the building based on the backyard space. Mine works out to an oddball size, so we are going to ask to go a little larger to stay with standard pre-engineered sizes. It's a small town, so I don't anticipate any real problems as they have already indicated that it should be ok. I just need to get through some other stuff and we can pile the cash up for it pretty quick. I'm hoping to get it going this fall and be in it before the end of the year.

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    I must have talked to the same guy a few years ago.
    25x40 was $10K, all welded.

    Right now I just need a 25x40 4-car garage. Can't do metal here at the house (Keller area).

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    On that size, I would strongly urge wood if you are crafty or construction oriented. I also think a lot of people are afraid of DIY trusses. Usually can save 50% with DIY. can probably find some standard plans somewhere to get the county satisfied. Either way, wood will be cheap.

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    Quote Originally Posted by viper View Post
    On that size, I would strongly urge wood if you are crafty or construction oriented. I also think a lot of people are afraid of DIY trusses. Usually can save 50% with DIY. can probably find some standard plans somewhere to get the county satisfied. Either way, wood will be cheap.
    I am not construction oriented, though I'd probably sub it myself. I'm in the county so no permits or code issues.
    I already have a 25x20 carport slab that i'd just double and build from there.

    All I lack is starting

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rex TX View Post
    I am not construction oriented, though I'd probably sub it myself. I'm in the county so no permits or code issues.
    I already have a 25x20 carport slab that i'd just double and build from there.

    All I lack is starting
    I car port slab most likely does not have the concentrated load bearing ability due to lack of footings or stem wall. I certainly would not just build a building on a carport slab without knowing more about it. maybe if you poured it, you know the design. In calculating the weight, it gets up there quick. Need to be careful there.

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    I've had people look at it and they seemed to think it was thicker than most carport slabs. My concern would be tieing the two sections together. This site is on a hillside, so that's a consideration. At any rate, the carport slab will continue to be just for parking cars, with machine tools and cars on the addition.

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    On the metal buildings... call and confirm the sellers physical location, then drive by to see if they stock building materials. There are a lot of "low cost bidders" out there. Nothing more than a guy/gal with a computer. They are subcontracting everything with a third or fourth party. Huge nightmares.

    I used www.metalmarts.com in 2004.
    30' x 50' x 14' side walls, 4:1 roof pitch. FOUR DOORS 2 12' x 12' doors, 2 10' x 12'. $16K in 2004, $5K to erect it. Slab was full perimeter footing, 6" to 8" deep (machinery) and ran $12K then.

    A friend used Atlantic Building Systems: Steel Buildings and much more. and really liked working with them. (keep in mind that was in 2004)

    Lots of excellent ideas on Purdue's Ag Extension web site:
    AE-104

    Here in Texas, the 'thin insulation' with a reflective barrier is highly recommended. Helps keep the heat down (105F outside, 120F here in the shop at the moment.... ).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve in SoCal View Post
    We are looking at a piece of property in Hutchinson to build a shop on. The shop would be a small scale seed oil crushing plant. Preliminary estimates of 5-6000 feet under roof and one or more lean to overhangs.

    What is a realistic price for a metal building with a slab floor, nothing fancy.

    Steve
    Be careful when you're shopping around; you get what you pay for. I got my degree in civil engineering/construction and boy did they stress ethics...because unfortunately in the construction industry is easier than most think to cut corners to save $ in both the design and construction phases.

    Anyways, MBMI Metal Buildings runs specials on several basic building designs that they have had their in-house engineers pre-design for each state based on each state's building codes & in Texas their 50x100x16 clearspan steel building is $32,201.

    50 x 100 x 16 Steel Building Special in Texas

    This building comes with comes pre-welded with a 40-yr warranty and they even have a 30-days delivery guarantee on most building. The only thing I don't think it includes is the footing, but most metal building companies don't. From what I can tell only very complex buildings are excluded because of the complex engineering design work they require...so I'd say the basic shop you are looking to create could be delivered in 30-days. Hope this helps. Keep us updated

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    I just got a quote on a new building. I am looking to build a #2 shop, equipment storage building. The building I priced was 50' x 80' x16' pole barn with a 20' x14' sliding door is 31,080$, add 6,120$ for insulation, add 2,485$ for overhead door. erected on site in Western Kansas. does not include concrete. I talked to my concrete buddy and he said 4$ square foot for 6" cement.

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    I paid a lot for my new building, partly because it's all metal and insulated. I looked at pole barns, and would only have saved about 30%. I'm glad I chose all metal. It can't burn or rot or sag and has superior wind resistance and strength. Bugs can't eat it, and with quality insulated roll up doors and metal man doors rodents and bugs can't get in. You pay for what you get.

  17. #17
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    As mentioned in the title, pole barns etc are out. The last post sums up merits of metal. The only alternative construction we would consider is concrete and that is far more expensive. We are weighing the pros and cons of building out this site. There is a lot more than just a building and overhang.

    Steve

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    Some places more than others, the tax man likes all steel much better than pole barns also.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by viper View Post
    On that size, I would strongly urge wood if you are crafty or construction oriented. I also think a lot of people are afraid of DIY trusses. Usually can save 50% with DIY. can probably find some standard plans somewhere to get the county satisfied. Either way, wood will be cheap.
    This is what I did on my 40x60. Lots of work, lots of satisfaction when it's finished.

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    My 5000 sq ft shop (50x100x16 eave) building built in California in 2007, was approximately $40k grading/foundation, $85k building/erection, and $5k for interior wiring. The building is nice, insulated, wall light panels, 2 electric roll-up doors, one manual roll-up, 3 man doors, 6 windows It has a 20x40' leanto extension of the roof on one corner. We had additional costs for exterior concrete flatwork, driveway, utility trenching for power, water and communication, and septic installation. We later built-out 1200 sq ft of office space including a restroom. My total cost was upwards of $300k. The basic building could have been usable for less than $150k.


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