Milling End of DOM Tubing
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  1. #1
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    Default Milling End of DOM Tubing

    Hey guys/gals! I am very new to milling/machining. I would like to know the best way to mill the ends of some DOM tubing. I am making bushing housings for some leaf spring shackles and they need to be exactly 2.5" wide. The DOM tubing is 1.5" x .25" wall.

    I have a JET mill/drill. Should I use the tip or side of the end mill to remove excess material off the end of the 2.5" piece of tubing? Also, should I place the tubing vertical or horizontal in the vise? Just looking for the best technique.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnygrant View Post
    Hey guys/gals! I am very new to milling/machining. I would like to know the best way to mill the ends of some DOM tubing. I am making bushing housings for some leaf spring shackles and they need to be exactly 2.5" wide. The DOM tubing is 1.5" x .25" wall.

    I have a JET mill/drill. Should I use the tip or side of the end mill to remove excess material off the end of the 2.5" piece of tubing? Also, should I place the tubing vertical or horizontal in the vise? Just looking for the best technique.
    Why not chuck it in the lathe ?

    "exactly 2.5" wide" so your tolerance is +/- .125 ?

    Belt sander time.....

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    Hello, Johnny. If you're just trying to adjust the length, a lathe would be 1st choice if you have one. Holding a round piece vertically in a vise requires at least one V-block, otherwise it's sure to shift during the cut and that usually trashes your endmill. Gripping the part horizontally and side-milling the ends is much safer assuming your vise has deep enough jaws to reach at least to the halfway point on the tube. Again, if you have a lathe it will be a lot faster.

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    Before this gets locked.
    Vertical and not a endmill but a facemill..
    One pass and done.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    . . .not a endmill but a facemill...
    Maybe, but it is a mill-drill.

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    Correct, milling is the wrong way to hit this. assuming you don’t have a decent lathe that can part off 1.5 X .250 easily, saw it to near size in a horizontal bandsaw, (or cold saw, but don’t think you have one), then set up a stop in the lathe (spider or workstop) and turn to length. First a bit oversize, square one end on all, then set to final size and face off the other end.

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    Thanks for the info guys! I don't have a lathe, just a mill/drill. I have a horizontal band saw, just trying to get the right tolerances with a finishing touch.

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    With your tools hold the material horizontally in the vice and side mill to length. Clean one side, flip and clean the other, measure while in vice, cut to final dimension.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnygrant View Post
    Thanks for the info guys! I don't have a lathe, just a mill/drill. I have a horizontal band saw, just trying to get the right tolerances with a finishing touch.
    ...and what would those tolerances be ?

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    laying the tube down in the vice will require an end mill with at least 1.5 length of cut....in a mill/drill?
    I'd suggest investing in a v_block with tube standing on end
    finish 1 side of all of the group
    flip and start with finishing 1
    once the height is established finish the rest without adjusting spindle height( checking as you go)

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    Put a 1” expanding arbor in the mill chuck and slip the DOM over the arbor. Put a cutting tool in your vice and move the rotating DOM horizontally over the cutting tool. Sorta like an inverted vertical lathe. Since you don’t have a lathe and you may be trying to do this on the cheap you can get the expanding arbor and tool bit from CDCO.com.
    Also, since this setup is not a lathe, be cautious about trying to take to big of a bite or you’ll knock your mill out of tram.

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    I could be wrong, but I suspect the OP has SQUARE tubing so a vee block may be unnecessary.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    I could be wrong, but I suspect the OP has SQUARE tubing so a vee block may be unnecessary.
    Could be, but 'DOM' and 'bushing housings for leaf spring shackles' make me think round.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    Could be, but 'DOM' and 'bushing housings for leaf spring shackles' make me think round.
    I'm sure that's the case. The only DOM square tube I've ever seen is the 2-1/2" stuff they use for trailer hitch
    receiver tubes. They put something through it to remove the slag from the inside seam...

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    Just because you now have a mill does not mean you need to use it for everything. It's just a freaking leaf spring shackle bushing so any precision is wasted. Just cut the tubing off on the bandsaw and get on with life. Plus or minus 1/16" is good enough. Use the mill when a thousandths means something.

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