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  1. #21
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    Thanks. I'll give you $800 for it. lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by Domodude17 View Post
    The shop space I have has a ceiling of 80-1/2 inches. Looking around, it looks like you need at least 84". I could theoretically cut a hole into the ceiling between the rafters, but i'd like to avoid that. I had originally been looking for a hobby size mill (Rockwell 21-100, Clausing 8520, etc), but the larger machines are much more available in my area, for between 1k-5k and I can reluctantly live with parking my car outside year-round.

    I saw on a different post that a cincinatti toolmaster only needs 72". Does anyone have any suggestions for other shorter stature machines I should be searching for or keeping an eye out for? Thanks!
    The Abene universal I just bought is 79" but that is with the articulating arm light / lamp that is fixed to the top of the horizontal ram. You can shave off a couple of inches with that removed.

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    Anyone who posses somewhat capable Machinist Skills,surely could learn how to open up the ceiling and re frame and drywall the remodel.Easy Peasy

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    The obvious answer is to dig a pit and pour concrete. Make it big enough the machine can be tipped uprite without hitting the ceiling. Make sure the hypotenuse stays less then your height over the pit floor. Many folks like to add a few inches of wood floor in front of taller machines. Even if just to work a wrench on the drawbar top end. So a pit may mak the ergonomic of running the machine better.
    Lumber mill near me had a big bandsaw with the lower foot or so in a pit so the table top was a comfortable height. Probably 36 or40" wheels plus table thickness makes lifting heavy beams that high difficult.
    Bill D.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    Thanks. I'll give you $800 for it. lol
    You could probably find one just like it for not much more, these go pretty cheap these days. If I were to sell it to you, I'd
    have to put it back in the same condition as it was when I bought it - somebody had replaced all the handwheels on that
    machine with amazing ones, that had been welded up from rebar. Yep, spokes, rim, and handle, on all three axis, were
    hand-made from steel re-bar. I have NO idea what had happend to that milling machine but it also came without the
    original switchgear. Sobel gave me the correct drum switches and I managed to doctor it all back together. Then
    I ordered three blank cast iron handwheels from McMaster Carr, and got a buddy at work turn the three handles
    on the CNC lathe they had there at the time.

    Still the machine is a mainstay of my home shop. As I say, I have a vertical head but it's never used.

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    I have exactly the same issues, and no option to go up into the rafters (flat roof). I would recommend Deckel FP1 or FP2, both will fit very comfortably in your space.

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    "You could probably find one just like it for not much more, these go pretty cheap these days."

    The way it works for me, is if I want one, I can't find one. Then, when I search, I find several that have all the tooling in mint shape for cheap - that sold 6 months ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    "You could probably find one just like it for not much more, these go pretty cheap these days."

    The way it works for me, is if I want one, I can't find one. Then, when I search, I find several that have all the tooling in mint shape for cheap - that sold 6 months ago.
    Leigh Bassett's widow has a nice Nichols sliding-head, here in the DC metro area.

    Lemme go find the thread & fotos:

    Leigh Basset - Google Photos

    Contact info:

    Tooling & Machinery from "The Real Leigh" Estate

    That's a latter-years, post "Delta Rockwell" acquisition machine from the badges.

    Far the better all-around mill for useful in small space than Jim's Hardinge or my Burke, either one. Seemed to have a basic selection of tooling, too.

    Fastenal exists, mile away. And I am still trying to turn decent 2-by and 4-by into pallets before it simply rots or I have to lod it, pay 66/ton after hauling it 15 miles to the landfill.

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    Is it possible to raise the ceiling? My son bought an old house that had 6'-6" ceilings on the second floor. House was built in 1843 with 3x4" ceiling joists. I tore down the horse hair plaster, then added 2x8 ceiling joists above the existing ones. Then removed the old joists. His ceiling is now 7'-10" .
    I nailed the new joists to the rafters , the wall is still 6'-6" but slopes up to new height.
    Without actually seeing your shop it is hard to say if this method would work for you.
    mike

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    Quote Originally Posted by mike 44 View Post
    Is it possible to raise the ceiling? My son bought an old house that had 6'-6" ceilings on the second floor. House was built in 1843 with 3x4" ceiling joists. I tore down the horse hair plaster, then added 2x8 ceiling joists above the existing ones. Then removed the old joists. His ceiling is now 7'-10" .
    I nailed the new joists to the rafters , the wall is still 6'-6" but slopes up to new height.
    Without actually seeing your shop it is hard to say if this method would work for you.
    mike
    Not as easy as rafters if it's the typical too slim a margin engineered pre-fab TRUSS. And/or (my case) the overhead has to match the floor, garage annex to a three-level split.

    PO did the slab exactly right to hit an 8-foot ceiling, but could go but an inch or three lower w/o the driveway bringing water TO, rather than sloping AWAY.

    Did we fail to suggest a shorter mill?

    Not as if he had already BOUGHT one and JF HAD to live with it.

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    I think the Gorton 0-16 mill is less than 6' tall.

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    Bridgeport made at least at one time what are generally referred to as 3/4 sized mills. Since I don't own one I can't verify it's overall height. I do know there quite rare.My shop floor is sort of weight restricted as well as like yours with a fairly low ceiling height. I did a whole lotta searching since I wasn't willing to have any vertical without the built in spindle feeds and finally came across the one I bought made by Bemato in Taiwan. It's 77 1/2" in height to the top of the 2 hp 3 ph motor. Table size is 35" x 9" with standard full size tee slots. Weight about 1100 lbs. That power feed head isn't something specially built in a smaller size, what they did was mount a standard full sized head to the smaller machine. Yes the more normal sized 2200 lb Bridgeports or decent clones would be better, that wasn't an option for me. But mine will do about anything I want. Last time I checked Precision Matthews was offering the exact same mill with a different brand placard on it. The squared off column casting is fairly distinctive for it's shape so I know it's the same machine. Going by the pictures in my user manual then at the time Bemato were also building at least one model of mill for (cough) Jet in the same size, but without that powered spindle feed or a nod feature on the head knuckle. There are a few of these 3/4 sized mills being built by at least one or two manufacturers in Taiwan. There just really hard to find unless you actively go searching for them. Any table feeds or 3 3/8ths spindle mount tooling that's built for a real Bridgeport will also fit on mine with no changes. My shops ceiling height is about 2" short for pulling the drawbar if I need to. So tilting the head and retramming it back in isn't ideal, but doesn't take long. No one ever said owning machine tools was for pussy's. :-)

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    Think out of the box.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jordan06.jpg   81827285_-1x-1_1000000000_center_ffffff_-1_0_0_0.jpg   14130a.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by rustytool View Post
    I think the Gorton 0-16 mill is less than 6' tall.
    Heald, Gorton, USMT/Burke/Houdaille, Diamond, Frey, Nichols, Hardinge, Sheldon, Elliot, South Bend....

    WTH you can fit a Barker inside a common residential OVEN ..etc,,..

    It just isn't really a "tall order" to select any of fifty mills that Just FIT.

    If yah want a portal or gantry mill with 50 HP or better CNC'ed heads?

    Well.. NOW yah need to go find an INDUSTRIAL site.

    K-Y Jelly and a shoe horn or hydraulic press just won't get THAT job done any faster than "wishing-for" will!


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    Quote Originally Posted by MichaelP View Post
    Think out of the box.
    How about some info on those first two pics? Is that first one a salesman sample?

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    Thanks for the suggestions everyone, i'll keep poking around with some new keywords for my internet searches.

    While it would technically be possible to raise the ceiling, it's an area of the house where all the plumbing terminates into the master drain cleanout, has a large ceiling mounted electrical box, a good majority of the water pipes, an internet line, and a dryer duct. So its quite congested and is much more work than i'd like to undertake!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dualkit View Post
    How about some info on those first two pics? Is that first one a salesman sample?
    Model Engineers?Barry Jordan

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    Quote Originally Posted by crrmeyer View Post
    I would usually recommend a Millrite mill, but looking at the manual it is 82" tall.

    Burke Machine Tool Co. - Publication Reprints - Millrite maintenance instructions and parts list | VintageMachinery.org
    I have a Millrite model MVI with the 1100-rpm pancake motor. It fits comfortably under a 79.5 inch high ceiling. I do have to rotate the head to horizontal to remove the draw bar, but there is plenty of headroom for ordinary operation. I did have to unbolt the head assembly from the base to get the machine through the doorway, but this is not difficult to do with a mobile engine hoist and some cribbing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Domodude17 View Post
    Thanks for the suggestions everyone, i'll keep poking around with some new keywords for my internet searches.

    While it would technically be possible to raise the ceiling, it's an area of the house where all the plumbing terminates into the master drain cleanout, has a large ceiling mounted electrical box, a good majority of the water pipes, an internet line, and a dryer duct. So its quite congested and is much more work than i'd like to undertake!
    Well, yazz, but... three DOZEN posts in, and to yer credit yah DID start out with:
    ...had originally been looking for a hobby size mill (Rockwell 21-100, Clausing 8520, etc.
    So we know the headroom.

    And we know a "light" mill - and vertical - is all yah need.

    Back to "square ONE". Most ANY medium horizontal with almost ANY low-mount vertical head will "out chip" the Rockwell or Clausing, and cheaply. WTH, if I but put traversing table to it, so would a serious drill press. "Mill-drill" equipped. (two-plus TONS, 7 HP, MT #5. The table weighs more than a Rockwell)

    Yah just have to start looking for one yah can actually BUY within yer budget,. Whatever that is. "Go-Fetch" included.

    Not to put TOO fine a point on it, but "Ohio" is about as good a place to BE to find anything machine-ic.

    A go-fetch to McKean, HGR, Golden, or ERC is a thousand mile r/t from where I sit, Metro DC.

    THEN ask:

    "I have a line on a <possibility "A">. Can anyone share their experience with it?"

    If a PM'er, globally, dont OWN or at least have had the past experience of tooling-up and RUNNING a machine-tool, however old, new, rare, or common?

    It ain't yet been BUILT!


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    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    Well, yazz, but... three DOZEN posts in, and to yer credit yah DID start out with:


    So we know the headroom.

    And we know a "light" mill - and vertical - is all yah need.

    Back to "square ONE". Most ANY medium horizontal with almost ANY low-mount vertical head will "out chip" the Rockwell or Clausing, and cheaply. WTH, if I but put traversing table to it, so would a serious drill press. "Mill-drill" equipped. (two-plus TONS, 7 HP, MT #5. The table weighs more than a Rockwell)

    Yah just have to start looking for one yah can actually BUY within yer budget,. Whatever that is. "Go-Fetch" included.

    Not to put TOO fine a point on it, but "Ohio" is about as good a place to BE to find anything machine-ic.

    A go-fetch to McKean, HGR, Golden, or ERC is a thousand mile r/t from where I sit, Metro DC.

    THEN ask:

    "I have a line on a <possibility "A">. Can anyone share their experience with it?"

    If a PM'er, globally, dont OWN or at least have had the past experience of tooling-up and RUNNING a machine-tool, however old, new, rare, or common?

    It ain't yet been BUILT!

    Thanks for the good suggestions Thermite!


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