Milling table stone - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by M.B. Naegle View Post
    I like using Gojo and/or Boraxo to clean gunk out. If I get metal embedded and it's a basic use stone (precision stones get treated differently), rub two stones together, or rub the stone over some sandpaper with a flat precision surface behind it (old granite or machine table). In some cases you can use a sharp pick to get the bigger bits out. To keep it from happening, clean the surface before you stone and/or use mineral spirits or some other fluid medium to wet-stone the surface. I've also used Simple Green and Windex. Just something to lubricate the cut and help rinse as you cut so that the dust doesn't just roll around under the cutting action, the same as any other metal cutting operation.
    "learnt the WRONG way.."

    Do NOT.. raid the kitchen.. to use any sort of oil (flax/linseed, olive, avocado, macadamia, grapeseed, canola, corn, safflower, peanut.. hell. most any vegetable or other plant or nut oil-seed, "etc") ..

    ...that oxidizes or polymerizes .... into a wax or varnish... as those tribes nearly ALL WILL DO.. Coconut the exception? Only "maybe".

    Butter or lard would be lower-risk. Stone might soon STINK though!

    ., or your FORMERLY "abrasive" stone will soon resemble a bar of moving-picture-shew stage-prop lava soap.... but made out of slippery PLASTIC!

    Didn't HAVE to ask "how I knew that" didja?

    Human thing.

    We are born knowing everything, but if we wait too long to leave home and rule the world? We get stoopider as we leave our teen-age years..

    You'd have to have raised kids? And then their ears go and grow SHUT?


  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2143
    Likes (Received)
    2140

    Default

    Yeah there are a good many closed-minded or narrow-minded folks out there. I never understood the ones who "know it all" already. I have always been willing to listen to another opinion or someone more knowledgeable than myself and try something new. There's really no downside!

  3. Likes steve-l, Screwmachine liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Colorado
    Posts
    382
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    63
    Likes (Received)
    196

    Default

    Wait wait wait OP, what exactly are you stoning?

    Sounds like you went and stoned an aluminum subplate....which is bad. Or maybe it wasnt aluminum but it was dirty as others have suggested.

    Mineral Spirits soaking is probably good.

    When I clean surfaces for stoning, I am aiming for "CLEAN" as in, no oils, chunky buildup. Since I do it relatively often it never gets to a point where shit is clogging. Habitually, I use Chemtool B-12 carburator cleaner. I used it at one of my old shops and ever since then, I use it on all kinds of things, usually cleaning tasks. BE CAREFUL with something that strong though because it will MELT your enclosure windows and potentially destroy the paint on your CNC. Our mills seem to do OK on most areas but for some reason our 5axis trunnion doesnt like B12 contact.

    If you prep your surfaces with something like that, you won't run into this problem. Also don't be dumb and stone aluminum like I used to do.

    Also, what is your medium/liquid for stoning? Are you using straight oil? Should be fine, I use a light spray of WD40 and sometimes a spritz of the aforementioned B12 and that works very well. I wonder if straight oil is too thick? Shoot, at my old shop we would literlly just use water, just any compound to remove the swarf/chips as they are stoned off.

    Have I been doing it wrong? Am I supposed to be soaking my stones? That sounds like a shitload of effort. Don't fix it if it aint broke? I have been using the same norton stone for the past 5 years with no issue so...

    Flattening stones? Are we sharpening knives on a whetstone here? Arent they supposed to be pretty dang flat from factory? IDK about Norton US but the ones I have gotten from the Norton Mexico factory have been A+

  5. Likes tdmidget liked this post
  6. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2143
    Likes (Received)
    2140

    Default

    Have you actually checked those stones? I have never gotten a new one that was very flat. It's important that they're flat so there aren't any point contact areas that will cause scratching and high pressure contact. Making sure that the entire surface area is in contact at once prevents any substantial material from being removed unless it's sticking up above the plane of the surface.

    And you can stone aluminum just fine - use a silicon carbide hone. Make sure it's flat and keep it wet with mineral spirits. No problemo. Re-flatten the stone against a diamond plate to clean it once in a while.

    And you don't need a flat stone for knife sharpening... For a sraight razor yes, for a knife, no. I don't keep my hones soaking, just use a liberal splash of mineral spirits. Works fine, but I can see how the soaking would be convenient. Stone is always ready to go that way, don't need to find the mineral spirits.

  7. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    3,431
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1405
    Likes (Received)
    1521

    Default

    Personally I don't like the stone I use on my table or vises to be clean and sharp. I like it to be glazed and clogged so I don't remove any metal checking for nicks. If I do find a nick I then flip it over to the clean side to remove it.

    As for flattening it I find sandpaper will wear the perimeter faster than the center. I REALLY like loose Sic with a little soapy water to turn it into mud on a flat plate to dress mine, by far the best way IMO.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Illinois
    Posts
    621
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    215
    Likes (Received)
    389

    Default

    A few jobs ago I had a stone load up with aluminum cause I was using it to knock high spots off fixture plates. I started keeping it in the chip pan so coolant was constantly flowing over it. Over time almost all the aluminum washed out despite me still regularly stoning aluminum. It may not have been the best way or the correct way but it seemed to work well and I didn't have to mess with mineral spirits

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Central FL
    Posts
    892
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7
    Likes (Received)
    21

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by thermite View Post
    First-off, I suspect that far too many of us use WD-40 for FAR too many things it not only was not intended for, it is actually a rather BAD choice for, and also more costly than it needs to be.

    Regardless.. "Day Job" used Stoddard Solvent AKA "Varsol 1" to keep the stones clean.

    Haven't seen it in a tin for a longish while. Seems to have fallen out of "favour"? Carcingens? Toxicity?

    Description here:

    Stoddard Solvent - an overview | ScienceDirect Topics

    Might be an even nastier choice than WD-40?

    Can't win....
    Great instead of a link where I can get it you get me some twisted pinkos reasons why not to use it.

  10. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Colorado
    Posts
    382
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    63
    Likes (Received)
    196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    Have you actually checked those stones? I have never gotten a new one that was very flat. It's important that they're flat so there aren't any point contact areas that will cause scratching and high pressure contact. Making sure that the entire surface area is in contact at once prevents any substantial material from being removed unless it's sticking up above the plane of the surface.

    And you can stone aluminum just fine - use a silicon carbide hone. Make sure it's flat and keep it wet with mineral spirits. No problemo. Re-flatten the stone against a diamond plate to clean it once in a while.

    And you don't need a flat stone for knife sharpening... For a sraight razor yes, for a knife, no. I don't keep my hones soaking, just use a liberal splash of mineral spirits. Works fine, but I can see how the soaking would be convenient. Stone is always ready to go that way, don't need to find the mineral spirits.
    If you're using a japanese whetstone it does need to be flat, because it will tend to dish in the center over time. That sharpening method needs a flat surface.

    I haven't checked if my stones are flat no. Would a granite surface plate be an appropriate flat surface to see if it wobbles?

  11. #29
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    20,115
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    11976

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by metalmadness View Post
    I haven't checked if my stones are flat no. Would a granite surface plate be an appropriate flat surface to see if it wobbles?
    Well. depends on the colour of the granite.

    You run a fine line between being branded an exploitive racist for abrasive abuse of a black one -

    ...or of remaining as confused as you are already if your plate is one of those twisted pinko ones.

    Chairman Mousey Dung gray might be a safe compromise?

  12. #30
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    6,148
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2143
    Likes (Received)
    2140

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by metalmadness View Post
    If you're using a japanese whetstone it does need to be flat, because it will tend to dish in the center over time. That sharpening method needs a flat surface.

    I haven't checked if my stones are flat no. Would a granite surface plate be an appropriate flat surface to see if it wobbles?
    A stone really doesn't need to be flat for knives unless you are using one of those newfangled sharpening gadgets. Sharpening freehand it makes no difference if the stone is dished - you just hold the knife at the correct angle so the apex is sharpened. I would still flatten the stone now and then just to keep it from getting crazily dished, (I also use my stones/hones for razors and other tools so I do keep them flat) but I'd say it is by no means a prerequisite just for knives. I am a bit of a collector and sharpening nerd, I've probably got at least a hundred hones and stones between all the natural and synthetic ones in my collection. Many old natural stones for razor sharpening.

    Here are a couple images I took during a razor sharpening experiment the other day:

    20210430_120635.jpg 20210430_142146.jpg

    Those are at 400x optical magnification. First image is after bevel set on a 1,000 grit hone, second is after finishing on a Japanese natural waterstone and a quick trip over a CBN loaded strop.

    An easy way to quickly check a stone for flatness is to plop it on the surface plate and run an indicator over it. Put a piece of paper on top so the indicator stylus doesn't get abraded.

  13. #31
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    wales.uk
    Posts
    1,781
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    379
    Likes (Received)
    409

    Default

    I reckon if you soak in oil from the kitchen the rats and mice will need dentures, but the will have very sharp teeth till they run out.
    You can flatten with a diamond stone like the trend 1000/600 combo perhaps?
    Mark


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •