Are Milwaukee tools no good any more? - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 53
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,441
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1482
    Likes (Received)
    1625

    Default

    What about Ryobi? A quick check shows they are manufactured (well some maybe) in Japan under Techtronics.

    Ryobi - Wikipedia

    edit: I don't use any cordless at work, or in any industrial environment.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Houston
    Posts
    5,523
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    478
    Likes (Received)
    2354

    Default

    Everything Ryobi I've had is junk.

    I get kinda worn out over the 'Home Depot tools are not the same as the ones you buy for a lot more money in a 'real' tool store' bit. If this is true...delineate the differences. Show some proof.

    Every time I lay down that challenge, no one takes it up.

    As for batteries...I bought two knock-off Milwaukee batteries on EBay last year, not realizing they were knock-offs as the sellers do a great job of hiding that fact. They worked great for a few months of easy use, then both died stone dead. Shit. So that's the real downside to cordless tools...you know they're making an absolute killing on the batteries...$129 for one, etc.

  3. Likes Hightemp liked this post
  4. #23
    Join Date
    Nov 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    3,441
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1482
    Likes (Received)
    1625

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    Everything Ryobi I've had is junk.

    I get kinda worn out over the 'Home Depot tools are not the same as the ones you buy for a lot more money in a 'real' tool store' bit. If this is true...delineate the differences. Show some proof.

    Every time I lay down that challenge, no one takes it up.

    As for batteries...I bought two knock-off Milwaukee batteries on EBay last year, not realizing they were knock-offs as the sellers do a great job of hiding that fact. They worked great for a few months of easy use, then both died stone dead. Shit. So that's the real downside to cordless tools...you know they're making an absolute killing on the batteries...$129 for one, etc.
    Batteries are always the killer on cordless tools. Maybe they know when the life of the battery is gone, the tool is soon to be gone so they price them where it is easier to buy a new kit than replace a battery..??

  5. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
    Location
    Se Ma USA
    Posts
    1,450
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    112
    Likes (Received)
    819

    Default

    Corded Milwaukee right angle drill, type electricians and plumbers use. Not even a week. Tore the teeth off the gears.Replaced with a massive Dewalt right angle, type that looks to be made from a knuckle dragger angle grinder. Has a safety clutch so it won't kill you if the bit binds. And a 6" hole saw can bind.

  6. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    92
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    13

    Default

    Well I was in the "which brand am I going with?" predicament last year. Dewalt and Milwaukee are by far the most widely available around here.

    I figured I'd hit up the contractors and get their input. One solo guy, good carpenter, is die hard Dewalt, always has been. The plumbing and heating guys are going with the Milwaukee line. Another buddy is a Supervisor for a large contractor, he said they are phasing out their Dewalt in favor of Milwaukee. He said some of their Hilti stuff is being replaced with Mikwaukee, and they have some standing with Hilti (dealer, or some other large consumer status). He cited the warranties, & tool reliability. Another huge, national contractor I've worked with is all Milwaukee.

    I decided to go with Milwaukee, the tools felt better balanced in hand ( I spent probably an hour in the store picking them up & handling them). I preferred the belt clips on Milwaukee.
    Mikwaukee seems to be committed to the 18V battery line, Dewalt has 20V now, and the flex volt line, with 60V tools. 2 different series of batteries on the shelf, the 20V and the flex volts. Maybe all the Dewalt batteries interchange, I don't know I was getting tired of trying to decide, and didn't do much more research on the Dewalt stuff. I've read and heard first hand from users that the new Dewalt drills a junk. I like the Milwaukee impacts over the Dewalts. I do wish Mikwaukee would step up their compound sliding miter saw, because I think Dewalt is clearly superior though.

  7. #26
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    marysville ohio
    Posts
    9,269
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2646
    Likes (Received)
    6128

    Default

    I use the hell out of my M18 Milwaukee drills and they have been flawless. I have 2 4 1/2" angle grinders, one before and one after techtronics. Both get used a lot and are about the same as far as power goes. The new one has a spindle lock button, the old one needs a thin wrench. I have lots of old Milwaukee corded tools, on most of them the outer insulation is failing although the tool still works fine with the individual wires showing in places. Has anyone used a M18 1/2 " impact gun? How is it? I'm sure I would use the hell out of one.

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    4,026
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13
    Likes (Received)
    49

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moonlight machine View Post
    Has anyone used a M18 1/2 " impact gun? How is it? I'm sure I would use the hell out of one.
    Check out post #20 just above. It's awesome. So powerful that a buddy of mine broke the anvil in half on one. They replaced it no problem.

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Madera county california usa
    Posts
    2,400
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    21
    Likes (Received)
    594

    Default

    We have a V18 unit that was great but battery stupid expensive.

    Saw some V18 to M18 adaptors that looked interesting, has anyone else tried these?

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  10. #29
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    FINLAND
    Posts
    1,642
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    471
    Likes (Received)
    763

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Teggy1
    Mikwaukee seems to be committed to the 18V battery line, Dewalt has 20V now, and the flex volt line, with 60V tools. 2 different series of batteries on the shelf, the 20V and the flex volts. Maybe all the Dewalt batteries interchange, I don't know I was getting tired of trying to decide, and didn't do much more research on the Dewalt stuff. I've read and heard first hand from users that the new Dewalt drills a junk. I like the Milwaukee impacts over the Dewalts. I do wish Mikwaukee would step up their compound sliding miter saw, because I think Dewalt is clearly superior though.
    FYI: Dewalt 20v battery is actually same voltage as 18v makita and milwaukee batteries. Just cheap marketing trick from Dewalt, they quote maximum battery voltage and others quote average voltage halfway empty. If dewalt would be in car business they would be selling 14.8v car batteries.

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Woodinville, WA
    Posts
    1,774
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    205
    Likes (Received)
    377

    Default

    My personal choice is Makita. I've run just about everything they made over the past 40 years, and earlier this year finally donated all my older 18, 14.4, 12 and yes, 1980's 9.6 volt stuff, then replaced it ALL with 18V LiOn and some corded. I don't believe the Makita quality has slipped at all since globalization of manf, and likely better then ever.

    In older corded I have a bunch of Makita (can't kill my big corded drill) , B&D Professional, Bosch, Milwaukee, Skill, Timberwolf (love that RA drill, now made by Dewalt) and Elu. All of it is still pounding along.

    My buddy is a GC. He has a mountain of busted, burnt out and whatever Dewalt 18 and "20V" , but keeps buying them for his crews. He figures his guys are animals with tools so he buys cheap and often, and can get them at any Home Depot.

    On the job sites I'm on around here Makita and Milwaukee rule. I do like the Milwaukee M18 tools and use them often.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New York
    Posts
    10,036
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2610

    Default

    Milwaukee tools are famous for being high torque twist your arms off tools. if that is what you want. Metabo is famous for putting clutch on tools to limit torque and many people prefer that.
    .
    batteries come in all types. Ryobi lithium batteries are in 3 capacities. sometimes you might want smaller, lighter battery obviously holds less charge and other times you want bigger heavier battery that lasts longer. far as I know all batteries are only good for so many charges. that is after 1000 or so charges they only hold less than 75% of new battery charge and it goes downhill the older more used the batteries are.
    .
    some collect old batteries and in some cites have place or stores where they open them up and replace the actual batteries in the battery pack for like 1/2 the price of a new battery pack. battery packs that outright fail usually there is a fuse inside that blew rather than battery and charger melt and or start on fire. i guess i prefer the fuse than start a battery fire

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Milwaukee,WI
    Posts
    1,280
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    6885
    Likes (Received)
    996

    Default

    I always preferred corded tools to cordless. Last thanksgiving there was a black Friday sale with a Milwaukee fuel 18 volt 1/2" impact (1400 ft lbs in reverse), a 5.0 battery and charger for $260. I just loved it. I bought a Milwaukee fuel 3/8" impact to go with it. I just bought a Milwaukee 4-1/2" corded angle grinder to replace my Dewalt from 2006 and like it also. My favorite tool for driving fasteners is a Bosch 9.6 volt 1/4" hex non-impact driver with an adjustable clutch. I will be changing more tools to the Milwaukee 18 volt fuel line in the future.

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Michigan, USA
    Posts
    2,178
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3305
    Likes (Received)
    1717

    Default

    With all the comments about cordless batteries not lasting very long I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the Ridgid line of cordless products. My neighbor in Arizona changed over from DeWalt 18 volt to Ridgid 18 volt because he gets a lifetime warranty on the batteries. Battery goes bad he brings it to the Depot and they give him a new one, no questions asked.

    I'm still sticking with the DeWalt 18 volt for cordless tools. I've bought quite a few older tools off of Craigslist for really cheap prices, sometimes with batteries that are still good. I've been using them for at least 15 years and still haven't bought a new battery. These are all NiCad except for a DeWalt 18 volt LiIon drill kit that I picked up brand new at a pawn shop for cheap. Batteries interchange with most of my other tools and the batteries are much lighter than the NiCads.

    Cordless tools are like printers. They often sell the tools cheap because they figure they can make the money off selling you new batteries, just like cheap printers with expensive ink cartridges.

    I also think that most of the problems that people have with NiCad batteries is not cycling them down before recharging them. They have a memory and need to be run down pretty far before recharging them or they lose their capacity. I've gotten ten years out of some of the 18 volt batteries and even though they may not have their original capacity they still work fairly well for day to day jobs. Probably not good enough for a contractor though.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    Oklahoma City, OK
    Posts
    4,185
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    721
    Likes (Received)
    1765

    Default

    I have some milwaukee m18 batteries from 2010 that still work great. They dont get used often, but when they do its an all day affair and with regard to performance I can't really tell those from ones Ive purchased this year.

    Sent from my SM-G973U using Tapatalk

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    Saskatchewan
    Posts
    10,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1384
    Likes (Received)
    3666

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big B View Post
    With all the comments about cordless batteries not lasting very long I'm surprised that nobody has mentioned the Ridgid line of cordless products. My neighbor in Arizona changed over from DeWalt 18 volt to Ridgid 18 volt because he gets a lifetime warranty on the batteries. Battery goes bad he brings it to the Depot and they give him a new one, no questions asked.

    I'm still sticking with the DeWalt 18 volt for cordless tools. I've bought quite a few older tools off of Craigslist for really cheap prices, sometimes with batteries that are still good. I've been using them for at least 15 years and still haven't bought a new battery. These are all NiCad except for a DeWalt 18 volt LiIon drill kit that I picked up brand new at a pawn shop for cheap. Batteries interchange with most of my other tools and the batteries are much lighter than the NiCads.

    Cordless tools are like printers. They often sell the tools cheap because they figure they can make the money off selling you new batteries, just like cheap printers with expensive ink cartridges.

    I also think that most of the problems that people have with NiCad batteries is not cycling them down before recharging them. They have a memory and need to be run down pretty far before recharging them or they lose their capacity. I've gotten ten years out of some of the 18 volt batteries and even though they may not have their original capacity they still work fairly well for day to day jobs. Probably not good enough for a contractor though.
    The few NiCad battery packs that I have taken apart all had a bad cell in the mix. I can't see how any particular charging strategy is going to circumvent that happening. If it happened to nearly all the cells at about the same rate, it would be different. It's just a shitty technology, AFAIC.

  17. #36
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    FINLAND
    Posts
    1,642
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    471
    Likes (Received)
    763

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HuFlungDung View Post
    The few NiCad battery packs that I have taken apart all had a bad cell in the mix. I can't see how any particular charging strategy is going to circumvent that happening. If it happened to nearly all the cells at about the same rate, it would be different. It's just a shitty technology, AFAIC.
    Contrary to common beliefs totally discharging nicad and especially nimh before charging them is bad for them. Weakest cell discharges to zero volts and after that reverses polarity and it kills especially nimh cell in question pretty fast. And there you have your "bad cell". Causes sort of internal shorts to grow and the batteries self-discharge lot faster than normally (days or hours instead of weeks)
    Ni-chemistry would have been lot more succesfull if manufacturers would have included sophisticated charge/discharge/balance electronics like Li-ion batteries use.

  18. Likes JoeE. liked this post
  19. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Posts
    1,468
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    726

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Ries View Post
    I dont use cordless as much as some people, but I, too, appreciate the range of tools that will take one battery size. Although I still have at least three very different chargers on the charger shelf.

    I just like corded tools better- in my experience with cordless tools, which goes back to maybe 1978, after a few years, the batteries need replacing, and new batteries often cost as much as the original tool cost new. Plus, torque. Although, with M28 batteries you get torque. But the M18 milwaukee hole hawg kit, with two batteries and a charger, is $650, whereas my corded version was a bit over $200. Thats a lot of extension cords, right there.
    Manufacturers obviously don't like the business-model of buying a corded tool and keeping it for virtually a lifetime...the battery operated tools alleviate this on several fronts, and they have more hyping (err marketing) of the latest and greatest cordless battery motor, charger, etc. The only cordless tool I use are drill/drivers unless there's no other alternative.

  20. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Apex, NC
    Posts
    1,468
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    726

    Default

    I've always thought, in general, the Ryobi products are good product based on the price point and audience. They are much cheaper than the "professional" tools, and I've never had any issues with them. I had two drill/drivers for many years(quite a lot of use and many drops), originally NiCad, and bought a new drill and impact set on sale with LiIons that work in all the tools (so now have three drills and an impact driver, and saw((and have been fine for about 3 years so far), and still can use the same batteries in all. Maybe if I was using them all day all the time, I'd be more picky and willing to spend 3-4x for a portable drill (essentially a disposable tool, and consumable batteries). So the cost of replacement batteries and long-term compatibility also factors in.

  21. #39
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    New Jersey
    Posts
    1,923
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    174
    Likes (Received)
    1043

    Default

    I bought a Milwaukee m18 fuel set of impact driver and drill. So far they have performed very well. The only complaint I have is the drill literally will rip your arm out of the socket if it catches. Even ripped the side handle off once...she's skookum as frig eh

  22. #40
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    186
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1
    Likes (Received)
    14

    Default

    My son does construction and all his tools are Makita. I've had to replace brushes on a number of the tools. When the brushless ones go bad it's cheaper to replace them than repair. He's given us cordless vacuums and blowers too so we have lots of Makita tools. Years ago when I was doing the flooring in the house I bought Rigid because they had a cordless caulking gun. Used several cases of the large polyurethane tubes so it saved my hand. The Rigid batteries are long dead so I made an adapter using the top of a Rigid battery, the battery connector from a dead Makita and machined the mating hardware out of plastic. Only have to maintain one brand of battery now.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •