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  1. #221
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    In the old days when I was working as a technical writer at the Litton Co,, they were struggling with a magnetic rotary memory drive built by the Sylvania Co. It was the size of a wastebasket but had only a 16KB capacity. LOL.

    The small size was a dire inconvenience but the unit more than made up for that with its unreliability due to failing magnetic coil memory chips that had to be hand-soldered into its circuit whenever one would fail. They were good for about a week between failure before one or another of them would go bad. .

    The Defense inspectors (DCASO Group) were upset with the failures since this unit was to be part of an airborne military device. That being the case, they demanded that Litton bring about source inspection so that it might be possible to improve reliability.

    Imagine their consternation and disgust when the manufacturer's address was discovered to be an alley in Hong Kong. LOL.

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  3. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    I have to go back and rethink this out, triumph. My grad school buddy, John Eaton, did rotating backups on different levels. This ensured an efficient backup, with no danger of any more than one day's worth of data lost. But those were on tapes.

    I think what I'm going to do is get all my old hard drives out and figure out if anything useful is on them and then reformat them and use them to create the ISO images. I think it's probably a good idea to NOT store multiple ISOs on the same drive. I remember the story in the old old days, of a hard drive going down. These were the really old drives where you pulled a big (12 inch diameter) cassette out of the main drive machine, and swapped for another. Anyway, the main drive went down and Tommy the Tech couldn't get one backup to work, he tried another. Went through 20 or so. Finally called IBM. Their rep arrived and looked at the thing. Tommy said "I think the problem has to do with all that reddish brown powder in the machine. What's that powder". "That" the IBM tech said, "is your data". At least, that's how I remember the story.

    Your note prompted me to think: I don't have this set up as well as I need to.
    BTW, my next project (hopefully) is to create a dual (or triple! OS X!) boot dual Xeon with 128Gb of RAM. We'll see if I can afford the parts.
    I'll be interested to know what you come up with.

    I have some old HD's lying around, I think I'll start experimenting with ISO's on different drives, making them on a consistant basis.

    I backup data regularly onto large hardrives, so I won't lose data, but I need to do the ISO backups so I can get back and running with the minimum of inconvenience.

  4. #223
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    When's he back?
    I wanted to celebrate but my beer went warm so i drank it?

  5. #224
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    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Gwinn View Post

    This is from a "Winchester" style disk drive, which is about the size of a apartment clothes washer. If I recall, the capacity was somewhere between 20 and 100 MBytes. The disk platters turned at 2400 rpm. The middle diameter of the scraped band is 13.25". This computes to (13.25/12)*3.1416*2400= 8,325 feet per minute (95 mph or 151 kph), well into friction-sawing range. Extensive repairs were needed.
    Yeah. I remember those drives.

    Early 80's me and another guy were tasked with running RS232 lines from the computer room to one place or another. Whole room of those drives. We had to run this twisted shielded pair across the building above the dropped ceiling into this room.
    Shoulda seen the guys face when he saw us standing on top of the drive to get the wire through.

    I don't think they asked us to do that again.......

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  7. #225
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    When's he back?
    I wanted to celebrate but my beer went warm so i drank it?
    He's Ba-Ack-Ack....

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  9. #226
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    Quote Originally Posted by barbter View Post
    When's he back?
    I wanted to celebrate but my beer went warm so i drank it?
    Aw yes, warm beer, cold pizza. Good times.

    Tom

  10. #227
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tyrone Shoelaces View Post
    Nah, I'd rather hear more about Bosleyjr's stepfather. Sounds a bit like " Get Smart " without the laughs.

    Regards Tyrone.
    He was stationed in Berlin during the 60s. They'd send him into East Berlin and he'd walk around and observe how the East German secret police would tail him. His kids think he was a CIA agent, at least at one point. He told the story of taking the train from West Germany into Berlin. As per protocol, he had to register himself as a Foreign Service Officer when he boarded. There was a military guard attachment assigned to the train. I believe it was rotated between the Western powers, and on this day, the military guard was British. So this British sergeant comes up to Jim and informs him "Sir, you appear to be the Senior government officer on this train, and so you're in charge." Jim's thinking "holy cow! I don't know what to do!" but he keeps his composure. "Very well, sergeant. Thank you". So they're traveling through East Germany and the train is stopped. The East German police ask for the senior officer. Jim's wondering what the hell to do. The sergeant appears and says "Don't worry sir, we'll handle this". A few minutes later the train starts moving again. "Sergeant, what was your method in breaking the impasse?" "Well, sir, five copies of playboy and a carton of Winston cigarettes always works for us".

    But yeah, Jim reflected a pretty strong and competent era for our Department of State. Seriously, that guy knew something about everything, and for a lot of stuff, he had in-depth knowledge. In his later years, he added espaliers to the house I grew up in and raised pears. Planted quince (and harvested 400 lbs of it when he was about 83!). A dedicated bicyclist (he rode a recumbent to work at the Department of State! I can just see the stuffed shirts watching him pedal in!). BTW, he built the recumbent. Welded the chrome-moly frame and built the wheels and such. Passed away a couple of years ago. I miss him, but am glad he was in my (and my Mom's) llife.

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