Molding A Molten Glass, Questions - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Seems the feeling never comes back after you singe the finger tips enough times..
    My wife calls me "asbestos fingers" for the same reason.
    But she can eat or drink stuff I'm still waiting 10 minutes later for it to get cool enough to put in my mouth, go figure.

    I never did it for actual work and my so-called "skills" are quite limited. But when we were kids and my dad had to babysit us, he would sometimes take us along to the lab, set up a couple bunsen burners, the glass cut off saw, and give us a handfull of short or broken pyrex pieces, solids and tubes, to play with.

    Friends and one sometime help in the woodshop here are world class glass blowers. Been a hard economy for glass art the past few years.

    smt

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    Quote Originally Posted by atomarc View Post
    When my two boys were small I cast their initials from glass. Carved their first initial in a soft fire brick. Busted up a clear glass mayonnaise jar and filled the carving with small pieces of glass. Put the whole enchilada in my heat treating oven and let it cook. The glass melted and flowed nicely. After a annealing period and cooling...presto, a perfectly formed clear glass set of initials. It was a fun thing for the kids to be involved in as well a learning thing for me.

    Stuart
    What is a soft fire brick?

  3. #23
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    I wonder how many type of glasses?

    As far as I know, tempered glass is usually used as a window,

    How to softened and hardened a glass?

    How to make the color super clear such as lens and how to make it colorful such as red, orange, yellow, green, blue, etc.?

    Does optic lens such as handycam, digital cameras, etc., was made by a glass?

    How to make a bulletproof glass?

    Does bulletproof-glass was made by a glass?

    How to make glass not shattered when broken?

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by machine-ing View Post
    What is a soft fire brick?
    This is soft firebrick...Insulating fire bricks soft and lightweight are NOT hard heavy firebricks.

    Stuart

  5. #25
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    To the original poster, you probably don't want to use metal as a mold for molten glass. The melting points
    for most glasses are higher than most metals you might use.

    When I helped the tech pour batches of test glass, he used a graphite plate on the bottom,
    and a graphite block with a square hole in it, resting on top of that. The glass poured like
    cool honey.

    But that guy is the only guy I ever knew, who had his own sliver suit. Did not matter how cold
    it was in the lab during the winter, after the empty crucible got back in the box furnace, we
    were both drenched in sweat. And I was just the guy to lean on the bar to open the furnace
    door, and then get out of the way.

    When they set up as stirrer setup to stir batches in the furnace, they used a ceramic
    rod for the axle, and a platinum paddle on the end of it.

    You could make your mold out of platinum, that's one metal that would work.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jim rozen View Post
    To the original poster, you probably don't want to use metal as a mold for molten glass. The melting points
    for most glasses are higher than most metals you might use.

    You could make your mold out of platinum, that's one metal that would work.
    The melting point of the metal is usually not a problem because it never gets that hot. You force the glass against the mold in some manner and it immediately cools a skin that freezes the shape. At the 3rd Degree, they routinely blow glass into aluminum molds to form something like flutes, which they then reheat and stretch, bend, twist, or otherwise deform. Getting the mold as hot as the glass could be counterproductive because you could have bonding.

    For a couple of years I worked in a factory making reed switches. The glass tubing was formed by having molten glass flow through a rectangular hole in the bottom of a platinum crucible with a platinum rod in the middle of the hole so it came out as a rectangular tube about 1.5" wide. That was pulled out by a pair of rollers on the floor below, stretching it out to about .100" wide.

    Bill

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  8. #27
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  10. #28
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    If we can't use metal for forming glass . . . I need to alert owners of about 120 glass container lines that we have been supporting for the last 15 years . . .

    9100 explained it well - you have to royally screw up to damage a mold when forming glass. (Like pour hundreds of pounds of over heated glass in a continuous stream without it freezing)

    I have seen glass leaks from furnaces go through steel grating and structural steel when an electric furnace gets a hot spot from impurities or improper introduction / mixing of coloring chemicals.

    At the same time - hundreds of furnaces around the world melt 15 - 20 tons of glass an hour processed into bottles and jars using nickel alloy neck rings (forming bottle threads) and various alloy molds.


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