Most efficient way to drill fork lift fork? - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    No holes in forks.
    Chain is safety and allows pulling heavy trailers.

    Plates are welded under main channel to match angle of fork
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails hitch.jpg  

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by audihenry View Post
    Hey guys,

    Thanks for all the advice! It does both me a little bit to have the tip of the fork weakened, but I'm looking for the cheapest solution (not usually the best) as unlike most of you, I am neither capable of welding nor do I have the tools required to do so. .............

    Hmmm, what to do, what to do...
    What I did was take the stoutest wooden pallet I had, screwed a 42" x 48" piece of 3/4" plywood to the top and mounted the ball to the plywood. For occassional moving of smaller trailers (1500 lbs) it works for me.

    Steve

  3. #43
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    Water-jet ...

    Just drive up, hang your forks over the tank, and cut 'em.

    BTDT, twice.

    Never had any problem with the forks after.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by caracadon View Post
    I got a real chuckle out of that comment. I am continually amazed by the mental acuity demonstrated by members of this site as common and everyday. But backing a trailer is found to be "difficult"?
    When you're backing a forklift it steers the right way, right?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by audihenry View Post
    H The PO has torched the other fork but it's far too large to be used with a standard hitch ball bolt.

    Hmmm, what to do, what to do...
    So you've already got a hole in one fork? Just make two big washers, one under the ball and one for the nut. The one under the ball can be stepped so it all stays centered in the hole in the fork.

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  7. #46
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    I made an adapter that slides on and off easily using a Harbor Freight turn buckle that stops it from wagging. It works well and is also useful for the bench top bender to plug into.dsc00211.jpg

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  9. #47
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    Ive torched lots of holes for towballs,a simple solution to moving trailers...........lately millenial female Govt Machinery Inspectors been going around failing any fork with a hole,and demanding new forks..........one guy was crying to me about it......I said ....them women are learning the ropes.....obviously taking bribes from fork suppliers.

  10. #48
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    Used forks are not that hard to find nor that much money and most just slide off.

    Buy a used one either pre drilled (why it is not in use) or normal one.

    Drill that one and use it when needed.

    Having the ball at the end of long fork makes for great movement of the trailer.

    Takes some practice but great.

    Front hitch on truck works for pushing things into creative places too.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-G930A using Tapatalk

  11. #49
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    Mag drill with carbide drill or endmill should do the job

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

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    Mag drill with a regular annular cutter cuts right through it, nothing special needed.

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    Just weld a little mount to the canopy frame to mount the ball ,when its not being used.....and dont buy a chrome plated ball.......it will be stolen ,even tho,they are the same price as a black one.

  14. #52
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    Quote Originally Posted by caracadon View Post
    I got a real chuckle out of that comment. I am continually amazed by the mental acuity demonstrated by members of this site as common and everyday. But backing a trailer is found to be "difficult"?
    I didn't bother to respond to this comment but since it is back up and everyone can be reading it, I will.

    Anyone with the intellect of a goose would realize that steering in a narrow isle or restricted area will be limited. Steering with a ball on the end of the fork requires a wider isle because if you turn the forklift one way, the trailer will swing the other way before is turns the direction you want. With a load on the fork, it is often possible to raise it up to clear things but you can;t do that with a trailer attached. I am perfectly capable of steering a forklift, do it every day, but space is limited in my shop.

    Bill

  15. #53
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    I didn't bother to respond to this comment but since it is back up and everyone can be reading it, I will.
    Given your responding to a post of 02-22-2012. Some nearly 7 years ago. Feel free to rip him a new arse hole.
    Can you back a trailer or not?

  16. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by michael View Post
    Drive it up close to a mill and drill it. BTDT. Total time from getting on the lift to driving it away is 15 minutes.
    I don't think people here actually realize what michael actually said here so here is my version.

    Drive forklift up close to a mill - and place your fork on top of a section of wood clamped in your vise, adjust your fork so it rest on the wood but with enough lift so it can be "adjusted" by hand to center the fork under the drill bit. Drill it. Repeat with the other fork.

    How many people here on a machinist forum don't have a mill?

    Now regarding the hole, I suggest making it 5/8 to slip in a 1/2 pin.

    For moving trailers etc, fabricate a slide on section of tube and make it wider so you don't have to adjust the forks so they are right together, on my forklift the forks don't move that easy so argh... I hate adjusting them...

    Weld a receiver tube in the center so you can slide in the hitch ball.

    If you are a business I suggest you never drill your forks and use some kind of chain setup to secure this hitch receiver to your forklift. OSHA = BITCHES

    I want holes in my forks to secure loads so they can't slide not for mounting hitch balls but I will probably make one of these just in case I ever need it but my forklift is small, on hard surface only and my shop is only 30x40 so storing trailers in there is probably never going to happen.

    using my forklift with a boom extension to lift large but not super heavy items or pull engines where you just need a little longer reach to center up over the engine is more likely. So I need holes in the forks to easily drop in a pin to secure such things.

    Yes I do realize how old the post is that I quoted, and, how old this thread is.

    I never understood the dont revive old threads thing as adding new info or comments is that not what a forum is for?

    People will be doing searches about drilling forklift forks for the next 10,000 years and no matter the last comment date will be finding and reading this thread.

    so for all of you future forklift fork drillers 5 or 500 years in the future, you got my version to consider now.

    ~

  17. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by 9100 View Post
    I mounted a ball on the end of one of my forks to move a trailer and found that steering it was difficult with the forklift steering one way and the fork end going another. Removing the forks on my little NAMCO is easy, so I made a hitch with the ball just in front of the mast that replaces them. That steers easily.


    Bill
    Have to agree with Bill on this. And if you don't want to bother with mast mounted hitch I would suggest making a hitch bar that lays across both forks with the ball centered and grind small dimples in the underside of the tips so you can use clamp bolts (as in beam clamps) to keep it from sliding under load. After fabrication it would actually be quicker to mount than bolting in a hitch ball and the dimples would be invisible to casual observers.

    FYI, I've never seen accessories mounted to only one fork and over the years I've seen everything from chain hooks to brooms for sweeping mounted on forks, as well as numerous mast mounted attachments including long poles for handling carpet rolls and hydraulic grabbers for moving nursery trees.

  18. #56
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    Quote Originally Posted by NCWbob View Post
    I don't think people here actually realize what michael actually said here so here is my version.

    Drive forklift up close to a mill - and place your fork on top of a section of wood clamped in your vise, adjust your fork so it rest on the wood but with enough lift so it can be "adjusted" by hand to center the fork under the drill bit. Drill it. Repeat with the other fork...

    ~
    I used a drill press this way minus the vise. Worked just fine. A 1/2" bolt through each one to keep our shop made extensions from slipping around(we had some 2"x4" tube laying around)

  19. #57
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    If you are a sheet metal shop you can drive the forklift up to a laser or plasma table as well

  20. #58
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    Torch would be easiest.

  21. #59
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    Has anybody ever seen a fork fail due to the hole being drilled in it? Both of my forklift forks have torched holes in them, different sizes; and I use it for personal use only.

    I wonder if you could weld the holes shut and ground them down to make them look good for OSHA. Just go over it with a flapper disk and make it shine!

  22. #60
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    Gd what a bunch of know it alls, that dont know a thing.(use a plasma cutter) and turn it to glass...use a mag base drill and drill, I have done this 100s of times, the steel is tuff but very drill-able...dont use a pilot hole just drill slow with cutting oil.Keep it back from the tip about 3 to 4 inchs..Phil


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