Mould reconditioning help required. - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 31 of 31
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2012
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    4,756
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    4365
    Likes (Received)
    2884

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by implmex View Post
    I would be soiling my panties
    You wear panties?

  2. Likes digger doug liked this post
  3. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2073

    Default

    Hi Hardplates:
    You wrote: "is there much money in welding molds"

    Well the short answer is that the worst ROI on any of my equipment was the laser welder by far.
    The repair with the thumb image in the upper left corner is about a 250 dollar repair.
    A top end German welder like mine, bought new from the laser welder store is about 40 grand, and mine is a dirt simple glovebox machine.
    You gotta do an awful lot of repairs to make back the cost of the equipment.
    Not only that, you gotta sit and run the machine...I can buy a Haas Minimill for that, and run rings around my laser welder for productivity just because I don't have to babysit the Haas.

    I bought my laser because I just HAD to have it and it came relatively cheap out of a dental lab (11 grand plus what it cost to fix it).
    I'm not sorry I have it...it's a very cool toy, but a wise business purchase...no way!

    However, mold welding is great beer money and if you are a TIG master and can get set up with a microscope and a shutter for it, and if you already have a TIG that is stable at super low amperages (the dedicated mold TIG machines you can buy like a Pro Fusion, go down to 0.1 amp and typically top out at 80 amps but an ordinary Miller Dynasty is a well liked machine in this field too) you can have a nice hobby that you can run in your garage off a dryer circuit.

    As I said in my earlier post, you need to be really good to weld something this small with a TIG; that picture with the thumbprint is of a cone shaped part with a center bore and the edge is under 0.005" thick at the tip of the weld, so you need to be good at welding pop cans and razor blades together.
    I have the greatest respect for those who can do that...but the reality is that it's truly not that hard with a laser, so everyone who has to do this sort of work has one, and saves the TIG for bigger work.

    If you're serious about getting into mold welding, the laser is hard to beat, but for the prices you can charge, it's also hard to justify.
    Most that are sold go to big molders who have a maintenance department for their molds and can justify dropping that sort of coin just for the convenience of being able to fix molds on the fly without having to tear them down and send them to a guy like me.

    So as a fun hobby...sure.
    As a business from which to feed your family...not so much.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  4. Likes Paolo_MD liked this post
  5. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2073

    Default

    Hi Mtndew:
    Now how did you find out about my secret???
    Do I need to be concerned?

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  6. #24
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Geneva Illinois USA
    Posts
    6,239
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2689
    Likes (Received)
    2418

    Default

    How well does the laser work on Porcereax?

    Tom

  7. #25
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    477
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    128
    Likes (Received)
    179

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by implmex View Post
    Hi Hardplates:
    You wrote: "is there much money in welding molds"

    Well the short answer is that the worst ROI on any of my equipment was the laser welder by far.
    The repair with the thumb image in the upper left corner is about a 250 dollar repair.
    A top end German welder like mine, bought new from the laser welder store is about 40 grand, and mine is a dirt simple glovebox machine.
    You gotta do an awful lot of repairs to make back the cost of the equipment.
    Not only that, you gotta sit and run the machine...I can buy a Haas Minimill for that, and run rings around my laser welder for productivity just because I don't have to babysit the Haas.

    I bought my laser because I just HAD to have it and it came relatively cheap out of a dental lab (11 grand plus what it cost to fix it).
    I'm not sorry I have it...it's a very cool toy, but a wise business purchase...no way!

    However, mold welding is great beer money and if you are a TIG master and can get set up with a microscope and a shutter for it, and if you already have a TIG that is stable at super low amperages (the dedicated mold TIG machines you can buy like a Pro Fusion, go down to 0.1 amp and typically top out at 80 amps but an ordinary Miller Dynasty is a well liked machine in this field too) you can have a nice hobby that you can run in your garage off a dryer circuit.

    As I said in my earlier post, you need to be really good to weld something this small with a TIG; that picture with the thumbprint is of a cone shaped part with a center bore and the edge is under 0.005" thick at the tip of the weld, so you need to be good at welding pop cans and razor blades together.
    I have the greatest respect for those who can do that...but the reality is that it's truly not that hard with a laser, so everyone who has to do this sort of work has one, and saves the TIG for bigger work.

    If you're serious about getting into mold welding, the laser is hard to beat, but for the prices you can charge, it's also hard to justify.
    Most that are sold go to big molders who have a maintenance department for their molds and can justify dropping that sort of coin just for the convenience of being able to fix molds on the fly without having to tear them down and send them to a guy like me.

    So as a fun hobby...sure.
    As a business from which to feed your family...not so much.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining
    My Dynasty goes down to 1 amp but if you set the pulser at a couple hundred hz and primary amperage around 10% and background down low you basically have .1 amp. It would be something interesting to get into if I had the connections for work as I already have all the equipment to do it.

    While it takes a lot of $250 jobs to pay for a machine like that, $250 is good money for a couple minute weld if done by hand....not counting preheat/postheat. I totally get the need for machines like that as people that can do work like that by hand are few and far between and tend to be grumpy and difficult to deal with I just saw your pics and it looked like something I have the equipment and skillset to do. While I will likely never get to do mold welding cause I don't have the connections or "experience" welding molds, it looked interesting. Thankyou for taking the time to write such a detailed response.

  8. #26
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,731
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    35 years ago, one of my jobs was to drop off parts (mold inserts) to a local T&D
    weld shop.

    5 minutes, wait right here.

    No preheat, nothing.

    Last 10 years, the local Vo-tech has been teaching some of it, they say they take alloy TIG rods and draw them down to .010 for finer work.
    Welding done under a microscope, laser was just coming in.

    This summer, was in Laser weld shop, lots of work being done.

  9. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2073

    Default

    Hi again Hardplates:
    If you have the skills you will definitely be in demand.
    Grab some blocks of hardened tool steel and lay down some beads.
    The grades of steel to get good at are H-13 and 420M, also P-20, NAK 55 and NAK Hi Hard if the molders in your area are like mine.
    When you are comfortable putting a 1/32" wide corner bead on the edge of a square block without burning a little crater at each end, you will be ready to do 90% of the mold welding I do.

    BTW, the secret to success doing these parting line welds is to shield the corner with the welding wire, and ease off on the foot pedal at the end of the bead until you're no longer making a puddle.
    So make the weld starting at the center and work outward in both directions to the extremities so the wire is always over the unwelded corner.
    Don't bother puddling and dipping...try to lay the wire on the corner and get just enough heat on it to melt it and fuse it onto the corner of the block.
    Let it cool with post flow argon until it's black and then pop the rod off with a quick twist of the wrist.
    Tool steel is pretty brittle when a small cold bead is put on the corner of a big block, and once you figure out the trick of it, you can pop off the wire without taking a chunk of the corner with it, but only if the weld is small enough at the breakoff point.

    It takes a bit of fucking about to learn to do it consistently, but I don't even have to think about it anymore...I've done it a bazillion times.
    Remember, it's OK if these are metallurgically shitty welds; 99% of the time, no one's gonna die if you can't swing a Mack truck off them.

    There are lots of molders crying desperately for someone to do these kinds of repairs on demand, and especially if you are willing to travel with your Dynasty you should have no problem scoring work.
    It's just that there likely won't be enough steady work to justify a pricey toy unless you can build up a big customer base over a large area of the USA.
    Of course you need to figure out the pre-heat issue, but once you've got that sorted...you should be good to fly.

    So if you have some interest, I encourage you to give it a whirl.
    If you want advice at any point on how to tackle a particular job, post it on PM, and if I see it, I'll respond, especially if you shoot me an email too.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  10. Likes Hardplates, Paolo_MD, Spartan094 liked this post
  11. #28
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    2,611
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    2073

    Default

    Hi Tom:
    I've never welded Porcerax, but I do know that once it'e welded, it sure ain't no Porcerax anymore.

    For those unfamiliar with the material, its a porous tool steel that is used for mold inserts that are hard to vent conventionally.
    Obviously when you weld it, you melt all the pores together.

    It's an interesting material; the makers recommend wire and sinker EDM for processing it whenever possible.
    Grinding, milling, turning welding will all block the pores to some extent, so EDM finishing or hand polishing is often used to open the pores back up.

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  12. #29
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    West-Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,278
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2027
    Likes (Received)
    582

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tallen View Post
    Hi Doug

    The welder is also one of my most hated pieces of equipment as it seems to compensate slightly on every setting. It's as if it adjusts its wire feed depending on the current I choose. This makes fine tuning of the power/wire a pain.

    Tallen
    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post

    Ther used to be a system that, (I think) did this (the patent is very mis leading)
    called the "rapid arc" and it was used for overlay applications.

    It claimed less dilution with the parent metal.
    @ Tallen, good chance your welder is in “synergic mode” where the user adjusts one knob and the machine decides the other settings. The main advantage (old timey) was for somebody to set the machine & someone else did the welding… I’d get the manual out or post up the maker to see if someone can help you get it running like a normal mig.

    @ digger, was this a brand name? If not then → lincoln & miller both have rapid arc programs with some of their products (all basically computers that also weld). With Lincoln “rapid arc” is one of the pulse spray programs in the power wave machines that allow for higher torch travel speed (pretty high energy).

    The "Rapid arc" program is a miller patent work around for lincoln’s “power mode” on the power mig 300&350’s which is a “high speed watt based” operation that allows welding thinner sections without burn through. Both cool to play with on cheap china made chair legs...

    With very small boo-boo repairs, no one has linked a dot welding machine. Basically as small resistance welding gun that melts small BB’s. Although this site says it’s new & revolutionary it’s been around all my adult life??? Also pretty much boob proof if that matters. Here-> Dotwelders

    Good luck,
    Matt

  13. #30
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    15,731
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Rapid Arc was a company, now defunct, see edcraig at weld reality.com

    They had a patent.

  14. #31
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Kentucky
    Posts
    394
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    753
    Likes (Received)
    154

    Default

    Would moving away from mild steel to a stronger alloy reduce your problems in the first place?
    Some kind of pre-hard used commonly in injection molds?


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •