My customer just released a video showing off the robot hand I've been sweating over - Page 3
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 41 to 55 of 55
  1. #41
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    734
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    657
    Likes (Received)
    155

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by trevj View Post
    That's pretty cool Marcus!

    They did the same mistake that so many have done before in design though.

    There isn't a human hand out there that has a flat palm with fingers off it!

    At some point, if they want to duplicate the operations of the human hand, they are gonna have to take a little better look at the structures that allow the hand to move the way it does!
    the palm ! yes its only flat when the fingers are stretched out or it is against something flat . ok now for some joking the flat palm reminds me of the workers in that dire straights video money for nothing . not at all saying anything bad about the concept or your work both are outstanding as its not the first its not the last but its is a link in a chain the will lead to perfection in the end and how far are down that road we are who knows . thanks for sharing

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Dewees Texas
    Posts
    3,260
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    35
    Likes (Received)
    1088

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by implmex View Post
    Hi SBAER:
    You wrote:
    "It goes without saying that you could have found easier ways of making a living but it appears that you have made the decision to work on things that are the most rewarding for you."

    Yeah, I used to be a dentist and it was a career I just HATED.
    Making things is so much more fun, and is far more challenging too.

    The money, the status; these are mildly nice things but they are no substitutes for happiness, and if you're miserable in your work, you'll be miserable in your life.
    So I started my little toy machine shop when I quit dentistry in 1998 and never looked back.
    (I was trained and worked for a decade as a mold maker before dentistry so I didn't have to start the machine shop from square one)

    When my former colleagues drive by in their Ferrarris, I can still be mildly envious, but when they get messily divorced because they hate their lives so much they cannot be decent marriage partners, I stop lusting after their show-off wheels pretty quick.

    Compared to digging around in the slimy, smelly hole, this is pretty sweet...I get to have a nice hobby, I get to exercise my brain, and I still get paid for it!

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining
    Funny, I had a dentist that complained about working in dirty mouths. He retired early also. Maybe a robot to do dentistry is on the table? Just kidding I remember the comment about picking the nose like a five year old.

    You heard it before from others, but that is nice work.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Virginia
    Posts
    632
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1026
    Likes (Received)
    368

    Default

    With use and subsequent wear will the hands suffer from robotic arthritis? In the future will we see the robot wince when he bumps a digit sideways? Now that would be realistic! My hands could be modeled for the programming…
    ( Impressive work though! )
    Joe

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Country
    NETHERLANDS
    Posts
    22
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    8
    Likes (Received)
    6

    Default

    Wow wooow woooow , that was very nice project , nice job , well done !!

  5. #45
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    22,082
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joe Rogers View Post
    With use and subsequent wear will the hands suffer from robotic arthritis? In the future will we see the robot wince when he bumps a digit sideways? Now that would be realistic! My hands could be modeled for the programming…
    ( Impressive work though! )
    Joe
    All that will be needed is a simple re-bushing job.....

  6. Likes Joe Rogers liked this post
  7. #46
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Oregon
    Posts
    5,746
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    5662
    Likes (Received)
    2204

    Default

    Since this thread has touched on an intersection of dentistry and machining, I want to say a little bit about the gear my local dentist has acquired in the last couple of years. Untethered 3D scanner wand, live 3D free-form modeling suite, a 6-axis desktop milling machine, and a little sintering oven. He can do a complete from-scratch implant crown (or any similar large tooth surface replacement) in-house, starting with a scan of the specific mouth (and surrounding teeth) it's going into, adjust the fit in the 3D SW, send the job to the milling machine, then put the milled part in the oven to sinter and densify it. Once it cools, it goes right into the patient's mouth. Less than an hour start to finish.

    This is a highly integrated turnkey system, of course. A fair amount of HW and SW engineering went into this, and I am sure the vendor is charging dentists all their wallets can bear.

    I am not entirely sure how to characterize the milling machine. The work blanks are rectangular slabs of unfused ceramic glued to a cylindrical metal shank, and "chucked" with a simple setscrew. The work is held in the end of a quill with "Z" and "C" motions. There are two perpendicular quills, each with a pair of live tools whose axes are parallel to the quill axis. By controlling the extensions and rotations of the three quills, the machine can do undercuts of various sorts, in addition to the basic external contours of a tooth. I'm calling it a 6-axis machine, but there may be a better way to describe it.

    Oh, and before I forget! Very well done, Marcus. Both the execution and the design-for-making engineering collaboration.

  8. #47
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    wales.uk
    Posts
    1,789
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    384
    Likes (Received)
    411

    Default

    I’m still in awe myself, imagine that on the end of a half tidy Mitsubishi or abb ( we steered away from kuka due to integrating the things with our network after the country that likes to borrow IP bought them, the hand units were nothing more than two mandibles on a rack, pretty crude
    Mark

  9. #48
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    St Louis
    Posts
    19,334
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2404
    Likes (Received)
    3662

    Default

    The hand is very impressive. Great work.

    The programming? Might need some work, I think that hand gave the viewers the finger 2 or 3 times..... not full-on, just a "bus ride finger".

  10. #49
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Flushing/Flint, Michigan
    Posts
    10,581
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    619
    Likes (Received)
    8551

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JST View Post
    The hand is very impressive. Great work.

    The programming? Might need some work, I think that hand gave the viewers the finger 2 or 3 times..... not full-on, just a "bus ride finger".
    Teleoperation.
    Bob

  11. Likes mhajicek liked this post
  12. #50
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Northern Illinois
    Posts
    3,032
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1678
    Likes (Received)
    1846

    Default

    Really cool, Marcus. I watched a couple of the videos, and the motion is fluid, without obvious binds or tight spots, and that is a reflection of your work, which I'm sure did not include the motion control. Speaking of which, I see they were testing two different control schemes; mimicking the motion of a control glove, which with proper feedback would be useful for remote assembly, either in a life threatening environment, such as high radiation, or remote by distance, such as the bottom of the ocean. The chess player is a different scheme; following machine vision and perhaps tactile feedback, which would be useful for prosthetic limbs. Both are exciting prospects. The motion control still has a ways to go, but that will come.

    Dennis

  13. #51
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Indiana
    Posts
    12
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sfriedberg View Post
    Since this thread has touched on an intersection of dentistry and machining, I want to say a little bit about the gear my local dentist has acquired in the last couple of years. Untethered 3D scanner wand, live 3D free-form modeling suite, a 6-axis desktop milling machine, and a little sintering oven. He can do a complete from-scratch implant crown (or any similar large tooth surface replacement) in-house, starting with a scan of the specific mouth (and surrounding teeth) it's going into, adjust the fit in the 3D SW, send the job to the milling machine, then put the milled part in the oven to sinter and densify it. Once it cools, it goes right into the patient's mouth. Less than an hour start to finish.

    This is a highly integrated turnkey system, of course. A fair amount of HW and SW engineering went into this, and I am sure the vendor is charging dentists all their wallets can bear.

    I am not entirely sure how to characterize the milling machine. The work blanks are rectangular slabs of unfused ceramic glued to a cylindrical metal shank, and "chucked" with a simple setscrew. The work is held in the end of a quill with "Z" and "C" motions. There are two perpendicular quills, each with a pair of live tools whose axes are parallel to the quill axis. By controlling the extensions and rotations of the three quills, the machine can do undercuts of various sorts, in addition to the basic external contours of a tooth. I'm calling it a 6-axis machine, but there may be a better way to describe it.

    Oh, and before I forget! Very well done, Marcus. Both the execution and the design-for-making engineering collaboration.
    That's the Industry I come from. I think a lot of people on here would find dental technology fascinating (note: different from dentistry, we make things for the patient through the dentist)
    5axis (3+2) desktop mills with 500w spindles that mill presintered zirconia in under 10 minutes, lithium disilicate(what your doctor uses chairside), PMMA, acetal, thermoplastics. We use optical scanners to scan impressions and models to then design crowns, implant abutments, dentures, partials, in CAD software. We 3D print models, dentures, crowns, night guards, jaws, surgical guides, from the scans the doctors take. We can mill titanium for implant abutments, use screws smaller than a pin head. Just incredible stuff. The average chair side mill, scanner, oven, diamond burs, precrystallized lithium disilicate blanks is going to touch $200,000 pretty easily. Advantage to chairside is speed over cost, we charge 1/10 what the dentist charges you for the crown we make but sacrifice strength. Some crowns have 1200Mpa in flexural strength compared to 300Mpa Chairside. Oh and yes dental robotics is developing in implant placement. Romexis is a company in that arena. I could go on forever. A dental technician in an abstract way these days is like a machinist.

    Marcus, awesome work. The work you do is incredible, I bet the dental techs had a blast working with someone as skilled as you!Dr. John Kois is pretty close to your neck of the woods.
    Last edited by _Kodak_; 06-28-2021 at 07:43 PM. Reason: Word salad

  14. #52
    Join Date
    Jun 2002
    Country
    CANADA
    State/Province
    British Columbia
    Posts
    3,171
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    3077

    Default

    Hi _Kodak_:
    Thank you for the very nice compliment; coming from a Dental Technologist it means a lot.
    I've always recommended that if you want to know who the good dentists in a community are, go ask a dental lab...they know more than anyone, who can handle a handpiece and who cannot; who can plan a complex case rationally and who cannot, who wants the unvarnished truth and who asks the lab to cover their sins, who will take ownership of their shortcomings and who will cover them with bombast blame and bullshit.

    As it happens, I've kept an eye on the march of technology through dentistry from the very beginnings of the development in the mid 1980's with Duret and Rekow (pioneers in dental CAD CAM)
    As it also happens, I was one of the very few dentists around who had a machine shop so I spent a lot of quality time doing implant disaster recovery.

    Back in the day when there were mostly pioneer implant companies going belly up as fast as they were being founded, much of my clinical practice was making implant superstructures for implants you couldn't get parts for anymore, and much of what I learned about making small precision complicated parts came from that exposure.

    I also learned to take out broken screws (very common way back when and very lucrative too because often times the implant companies were paying the freight and were motivated to keep their dentist or dental lab customers happy)
    I learned to make connecting bits to recover cases where surgeons had put implants in that you couldn't put teeth onto with the bits you could buy.
    I must have tapped a bazillion substructures for 1.2 mm Branemark gold screws, and I dug out lots of broken 1.2 mm taps when lab techs or the dentists had busted them off by accident.

    I made I don't know how many different varieties of prototype implant drills: spade drills, twist drills, 2 flute, 3 flute, 4 flute, piloted, un-piloted, flat bottom, round bottom, conical, left hand twist, right hand twist, drills for rats, drills for dogs, drills for primates and on and on

    I pioneered custom abutments with proper emergence profiles and gingival contours that followed the soft tissue architecture but I did it with a little pantograph I built instead of with CAD CAM.

    So much of the weird stuff I do now still comes from that legacy...it was a great education in making complex unconventional bits and I still rely on that experience for much of what I do.

    Thanks for the trip down memory lane...I haven't thought about those times in years!

    Cheers

    Marcus
    Implant Mechanix • Design & Innovation > HOME
    Vancouver Wire EDM -- Wire EDM Machining

  15. #53
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Washington
    Posts
    6
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    0

    Default

    That's far beyond anything I've done.

    Watching that, and thinking about what's next, all I could think about was that line "I need your clothes, your boots, and your motorcycle".

  16. #54
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Location
    FL
    Posts
    4,410
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    13745
    Likes (Received)
    5297

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 886DG View Post
    That's far beyond anything I've done.

    Watching that, and thinking about what's next, all I could think about was that line "I need your clothes, your boots, and your motorcycle".

    I need your clothes, your boots, and the keys to your motahcycle.

  17. #55
    Join Date
    May 2017
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,894
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    2538
    Likes (Received)
    1296

    Default

    My first thought is "telepresence". Once the dexterity gets good enough, and with a good enough internet connection, you can have any sort of high dollar specialist in one part of the world doing their work in another, for only as long as is needed and without airfare and hotel expenses.


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •