NARDINI MS 1440E opinions
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    Default NARDINI MS 1440E opinions

    I've been looking hard at auctions and want to purchase my first lathe.

    I've found these two Nardini's but can't tell really what the difference is between these two? Different generations maybe?

    NARDINI MS 1440 LATHE, 31.5-2500 SPINDLE SPEEDS, 1-1/2'' HOLE, 7'' SWING, 40'' CENTER TO CENTER,


    NARDINI MS 1440E LATHE, 25-2000 SPINDLE SPEEDS, 1-1/2'' HOLE, 7'' SWING, 42'' CENTER TO CENTER, A


    The down side is parts availability. I'm not to the point where I can or have the ability (lack of equipment) where I could make my own parts.

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    I think you're are right on the differences, vintage. I have a green one, same make and model, I use it a lot for smaller work, mostly gun stuff, it does quite well. It's twice to three times the quality of an earlier Asian brand I started with... but compared to other manual machines I now have, in good shape it doesn't come close to the trio of Monarch "61's" and a beat up Colchester I have, even the worn out one...
    The Nardini is handy to run, speeds/feeds-wise, threading - engaging the half nut on mine isn't real smooth, up to about 4" diameter OD cut's fairly nice, bores to 2" diameter ok. I rigged up a gun drill arrangement and pushed a 1/4" drill 22" deep through a piece of 1.5" 4140 with some real surprising results. Spend money on good tooling, keep the oiled and clean, and stay within it's work envelope and they'll last.

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    Quote Originally Posted by shutinlead View Post
    I think you're are right on the differences, vintage. I have a green one, same make and model, I use it a lot for smaller work, mostly gun stuff, it does quite well. It's twice to three times the quality of an earlier Asian brand I started with... but compared to other manual machines I now have, in good shape it doesn't come close to the trio of Monarch "61's" and a beat up Colchester I have, even the worn out one...
    The Nardini is handy to run, speeds/feeds-wise, threading - engaging the half nut on mine isn't real smooth, up to about 4" diameter OD cut's fairly nice, bores to 2" diameter ok. I rigged up a gun drill arrangement and pushed a 1/4" drill 22" deep through a piece of 1.5" 4140 with some real surprising results. Spend money on good tooling, keep the oiled and clean, and stay within it's work envelope and they'll last.

    You are saying the Monarch and Clasuing (colchester?) are better quality? I know I do NOT want a grizzly while the price is cool, you get what you pay for. I at some point want to turn barrels and other items as a side business

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    nardinis are a good machine. they don't last as long as the lathes mentioned but those both look really nice you are not getting a grizzley or some asian dog turd when you are talking nardini.

    They do wear out more frequently than say a well built piece of american iron.

    Ours has been at our shop for many years 20ish and it is starting to show its age a bit.

    fwiw, I would be bidding on the one with the steady rest. You are gonna need it sooner or later.

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    Quote Originally Posted by alonzo83 View Post
    nardinis are a good machine. they don't last as long as the lathes mentioned but those both look really nice you are not getting a grizzley or some asian dog turd when you are talking nardini.

    They do wear out more frequently than say a well built piece of american iron.

    Ours has been at our shop for many years 20ish and it is starting to show its age a bit.

    fwiw, I would be bidding on the one with the steady rest. You are gonna need it sooner or later.
    Saying it don't last as long but then saying the shop you work at is just starting to show it's age after 20 years..LOL

    This is more of a hobbyist lathe until I gain more experience.

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    Impossible to find parts for,at least it was for us.

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    I see your point about parts, but unless you need a gear or something the only thing you ...Might need is bearings or a leadscrew nut. Leadscrew nuts you can get a shop to make for much less than an OEM will charge.

    I love my Nardini, superb electric brake and automatic feed trip which are rare features. Clausing was built by Nardini under contract for a while and they are still in business: NARDINI ®

    The first one has the steady and 2500rpm spindle. They both look very well kept. Pretty hard to go wrong. Quality is better than 90% of what you will find on the used market.

    Chris

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris999 View Post
    I see your point about parts, but unless you need a gear or something the only thing you ...Might need is bearings or a leadscrew nut. Leadscrew nuts you can get a shop to make for much less than an OEM will charge.

    I love my Nardini, superb electric brake and automatic feed trip which are rare features. Clausing was built by Nardini under contract for a while and they are still in business: NARDINI ®

    The first one has the steady and 2500rpm spindle. They both look very well kept. Pretty hard to go wrong. Quality is better than 90% of what you will find on the used market.

    Chris
    What about leads screws? are those proprietary?

    Sounds silly to asked this but what is the difference in threading D.Pitch vs TPI? I've always set the machine to the TPI and threaded that way.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sendit View Post
    Saying it don't last as long but then saying the shop you work at is just starting to show it's age after 20 years..LOL

    This is more of a hobbyist lathe until I gain more experience.
    well the wear on the ways could probably be compared to a pre 47 american pacemaker that ran 3 shifts for 50 60 years. there is a difference in quality/longevity when you are talking about monarch lodge and shipley american, lathes. our lathe has ran one shift for 20 years

    For what you are doing I think a nardini would be an awesome hobby lathe it will serve you well.

    and for a hobby guy don't worry about the parts. You can make them if it breaks. when the fellas start complaining about parts they are from a working shop that doesn't want to diddle around working on a lathe as a machine that is down is losing money.

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    I have owned a few nardini 40" long travels in 14 and 16 swing. They do exactly what you would expect from a tool post of that size. Sweet little lathes that last a long long time. Careful buying any lathe at auction. Be prepared to be dissapointed as you have ZERO clue as to its condition. Green Nardinis are superior to the later white and blue ones. They made them right with flame hardened beds and oil channels going where they need to go. It doesnt mean you cant ruin one running it dry with cutting oil and hardened steel.

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    I am a big fan of the green Nardinis. Partially because they were what I used in school decades ago, and partially because they were so user friendly and accurate. Ironically, all these years later, I make replacement gears for them a few times a year, by request.

    They are good, solid lathes when taken care of.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    I am a big fan of the green Nardinis. Partially because they were what I used in school decades ago, and partially because they were so user friendly and accurate. Ironically, all these years later, I make replacement gears for them a few times a year, by request.

    They are good, solid lathes when taken care of.
    Quote Originally Posted by IAMATT View Post
    I have owned a few nardini 40" long travels in 14 and 16 swing. They do exactly what you would expect from a tool post of that size. Sweet little lathes that last a long long time. Careful buying any lathe at auction. Be prepared to be dissapointed as you have ZERO clue as to its condition. Green Nardinis are superior to the later white and blue ones. They made them right with flame hardened beds and oil channels going where they need to go. It doesnt mean you cant ruin one running it dry with cutting oil and hardened steel.
    How do the white and gray ones fair (in the link above). I can't find to many users with this generation lathe so I question how the beds are worked, oiling and what all change.


    ***I'm thinking the 1440E (white one) was painted because of the levers are the same for the green machines. I've never seen a white one with this control layout. Still researching though***

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    I'd go with the first one. Looks cleaner and less used. Plus it has 2500 rpm. That's important on a small lathe. I've never owned one, but know people that have. They really enjoyed the auto trip outs for travel. Very few machines come with that feature. Fortunately for me, both my Sheldon and American have that feature.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Behner View Post
    I'd go with the first one. Looks cleaner and less used. Plus it has 2500 rpm. That's important on a small lathe. I've never owned one, but know people that have. They really enjoyed the auto trip outs for travel. Very few machines come with that feature. Fortunately for me, both my Sheldon and American have that feature.
    Trips out of travel? Mirco carriage stop perhaps?

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    The difference between a 1440 and a 1440E is that the latter has a 2-speed motor and is electrically switchable. I wouldn't have thought that a 1440 can get to 2500. My 1440E's top speed is 2000.

    Nardini motors are made by WEG and are bastards to start. Mine is 6.5hp and I had to go up to a 15hp RPC to start the lathe.

    I really like mine. It's green. I have scanned the manual to a single pdf if anyone needs one.

    metalmagpie

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    The one I used was a pretty nice machine. Certainly good enough for home shop.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sendit View Post
    What about leads screws? are those proprietary?

    Sounds silly to asked this but what is the difference in threading D.Pitch vs TPI? I've always set the machine to the TPI and threaded that way.
    Nothing unusual about the leadscrews. I just meant the most typical thing to need replacement is a bearing or leadscrew nut.

    The first auction you listed also has a very nice six jaw chuck and roller steady. You will like this machine...

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    I looked at the two auctions you posted. The first one is way way better! You have a steady, and a 6 jaw chuck an a tray with at least a tailstock drill chuck and who know what other tooling. The second one doesn't even have a chuck! ( plus there is the mystery box on the floor with the first)

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    second one does have a chucck, it's in the chip pan, can see it in the 4th photo. Might have a steady also, can't tell. There's just no way of evaluating these lathes without an inspection. If they are too far away, it's well worth finding someone close by to look at them for you. You might also be able to contact the auctioneer to find out what's in the pans, but a disinterested party who you pay will give you a much better evaluation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sendit View Post
    Trips out of travel? Mirco carriage stop perhaps?
    Yes, probably a micro. My Sheldon works pretty much like the ol' Warner & Swaseys.


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