Need Help With A Sheldon Lathe - Page 2
Close
Login to Your Account
Page 2 of 8 FirstFirst 1234 ... LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 141
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    The book was delivered last night. Started reading. Very informative. When leveling the lathe I used the 8 leveling bolts on the base. The book says to use shims. Should I use the shims or will the bolts do?? I set the bolts on steel plates of 1/2 inch thick 2X2 inches with a 5/8 hole drilled partially through as a seat for the leveling bolts. Ware would I put The shims. On The other hand I don't think 8 bolts would hold it permanently.?? Got me wondering and WORYING. This lathe deal came with a milling machine "Detroit Model 2S" I have not picked it up yet. When I get it I will need much advise, that's for another day. Project is progressing. Thanks for all the help. Bill

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Location
    Modesto, CA USA
    Posts
    5,771
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    0
    Likes (Received)
    860

    Default

    For machine oil tractor supply has a good selection for the basic gear and spindle oils needed for a lathe. Do not use GL5 gear lube as it will attack any yellow metal used in the gearbox. GL4 or below is okay.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    127
    Likes (Received)
    271

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    . . .Should I use the shims or will the bolts do?? . . .
    In the leveling section (page 4) of the manual I sent via email, there is no mention of shims. The pedestal type lathes come with leveling bolts and that is all you use. Your steel pads under the bolts are good.

    NOTE: It looks like I may have sent you a different manual than the one I was thinking of, but they are very similar. Should still be useful and if I can find the other file I'll send that too. The leveling procedure I earlier said was on page 9 is actually on page 4 of the one I sent you.
    Sorry

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    72
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    29
    Likes (Received)
    20

    Default

    Yahoo has a Sheldon lathe group, one of the members “John Knox” worked for Sheldon for a long time and is a wealth of info on sheldon lathes,
    He always recommends using detergent motor oil in spindle, apron , gear box
    And never put it in back gear to remove stuck chuck.
    Don’t know how long groups will be around as Verizon now owns yahoo.
    But there’s lots of Sheldon info there.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Eureka, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,651
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    353
    Likes (Received)
    262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dlane View Post
    Yahoo has a Sheldon lathe group, one of the members “John Knox” worked for Sheldon for a long time and is a wealth of info....
    Yep, and he isn't reluctant to get involved at the detail level when a member needs help. An interesting fact that John revealed is the genesis of the Sheldon "EXL" series 10 x 36 lathe (also described as 11 x 36). Apparently this was the most-produced model by Sheldon (thousands made for U.S. Army and Navy during WW2).

    John recalls production of the initial models and notes that they were virtually identical to the Monarch 10 x 36. He recalls seeing Monarch working drawings on the manufacturing floor used to make the original Sheldon machine. I cannot at the moment find his detailed post about this but I did find this one on PM which briefly discusses the relationship:

    http://www.practicalmachinist.com/vb...g-post-203252/

    Apparently manufacturing rights were sold to Sheldon when Monarch decided that small lathes didn't fit their business plan. At least that is what I've read. Sheldon made refinements over the years and their products were reputed to be a step up compared to equivalent Atlas, South Bend and Logan models, those being in the same general market.

    Here's a little more info from lathes.co.uk. As always, thanks to Tony for his wonderful site - obviously a labor of love !!!

    Sheldon 11" & 12" Lathes

    A lot people on this forum routinely use machinery that is 75-100 years old, made by companies that closed their doors before many (most ?) members were born. It's likely needless to say that there is a LOT of satisfaction in producing precision parts with one of these old manual machines.

    P.S. Smaller Sheldons were factory-equipped with taper attachment, steady and follower rests. Bill I hope that you were fortunate enough to have obtained these with your machine.

  6. Likes atomarc liked this post
  7. #26
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    I used The Starrett And I believe I got it level Saturday. Read the book and email Sun. and Mon. Checked level Mon. And Its off. I guess I can expect some settling, I don't know how level it was before I got it. Leveling this is a little more complex than I thought but I will get through it. Once I get it level I guess I should snug up the anchor bolt,[not too tight or I'll be leveling it forever]. Then I will Have to check it often at first, not so much as time goes by. Well I am going to do some leveling now. I Can't thank you enough, I'll get back to you soon and often. BILL

  8. #27
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Yes My lathe came with a taper attachment but no steady or follower. I will keep an eye out for these as I gain knowledge, no point in going to e-bay till I know what I am looking at or for. Again Thank everyone for the help. BILL

  9. #28
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Thanks For the leveling advice. The Starrett Seems to be working fine. Got it level, it is touchy , but I believe I got it. Made a few practice cuts and some threads. Tail Stock Needs Aligning. Checked level after a few cuts, OK There. Got To Study the books and get my cutting bits sharpened correctly.
    get back to you later. Thanks a million. BILL

  10. #29
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Made Some Witness Cuts [Don't Know What To Call Them]Less than .001 out over 14". Could be tailstock out. Only been setting for 4 days. Should be settled in don't you think. Of course a three jaw chuck is no way perfect is it?. Anyway I am looking for a 4 jaw chuck and a face plate. Need some advice on removing the chuck and when I get it off and put on a chuck or face plate should I use "Anti-Seize"?? Never heard of that before but could be, what do you think. The plate the chuck is bolted to is machined smooth, no holes or flat spots. I will Send Some pics when by bride gets here to help. As always thanks a million and you will hear from me soon. BILL

  11. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Eureka, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,651
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    353
    Likes (Received)
    262

    Default

    I would call .001 over 14 inches toolroom lathe accuracy and wouldn't tinker with the tailstock for now. It's probable, no it's inevitable, that unclamping it, sliding it to a different position and re-clamping on the work will move the tailstock more than .0005, it's an old machine.

    If real accuracy is required and the work can be turned between centers, for best results adjust the tailstock for every different job. Sometimes all it takes is a gentle nudge then re-clamping. Sometimes all it takes is re-clamping without nudging.

    When accuracy is required over long parts, usually a few tricks are employed (hand work, mostly). But I'd be real happy with your current performance !!

    You might also try doing the dumbell test without a center, maybe a piece of three or four inch heavy wall aluminum tubing about six inches long. This will tell you a lot, next best thing to a test bar.

    My old Sheldon recently held a three inch long 3/4 diameter steel shaft to .0002 using a razor sharp cutter, slow feeds and speeds. No hand work required except a few quick passes with 220 and 440 grit paper. To say that I was tickled would be the understatement of the year.

  12. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    870
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    10
    Likes (Received)
    285

    Default

    For future reference I suggest you join the online Sheldon lathe group, actually 2 lathe groups, Sheldon lathe:
    Yahoo! Groups

    and Sheldon Lathe 2:
    Yahoo! Groups

    I would suggest you join both. They have a files section on each site that has operating manuals, parts manuals, sales brochures, prints of parts made by members, and a host of other information. They also have a photo's section which includes hundreds of members photos of various states of rebuilding and repairing machines.

    The site also has the luxury of having John Knox (a design engineer who worked for Sheldon from the late 1950's to the 1980's) as a contributing member. John is quite knowledgeable on the machines and has been a great asset. I have contacted him personally when doing some work on my 1960 Sheldon MW-56-P lathe
    Last edited by projectnut; 02-17-2018 at 08:48 AM.

  13. #32
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Yea, Your Right It Is An old machine and it took me quite a while to get it there. I am looking for a center {and I guess a sleeve for the head stock}, what should I look for and what size. I will also need a faceplate soon. I guess I Should get or make a something to protect the threads on the headstock. Is alive center better for the tailstock?? My book says to use lard or lord-kerosene {50/50}for the tailstock center, won't modern grease work and if so what type?
    I still have not found anyone who knows about the amp. difference on my phase converter. It runs fine and so far has not over heated so I'll keep using it as is. I am a retired electrician and I can't figure how it works. I guess I am worrying about nothing. Well I will get back to you later,THANKS. BILL

  14. #33
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Eureka, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,651
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    353
    Likes (Received)
    262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    Yea, Your Right It Is An old machine and it took me quite a while to get it there. I am looking for a center {and I guess a sleeve for the head stock}, what should I look for and what size. I will also need a faceplate soon. I guess I Should get or make a something to protect the threads on the headstock. Is alive center better for the tailstock?? My book says to use lard or lord-kerosene {50/50}for the tailstock center, won't modern grease work and if so what type?
    I still have not found anyone who knows about the amp. difference on my phase converter. It runs fine and so far has not over heated so I'll keep using it as is. I am a retired electrician and I can't figure how it works. I guess I am worrying about nothing. Well I will get back to you later,THANKS. BILL
    Hi Bill, I'm far from being an expert so I'm just commenting as a fellow Sheldon owner.

    Regarding tailstock centers, a good dead center, properly maintained, will always provide better results than a live center in situations that allow it to be used (although the difference may be undetectable by the user). Not only does it have the least amount of eccentricity with the tailstock taper but it takes up less space.

    This isn't normally a problem but can be when small work is being supported by the center close to the headstock. In situations like this, one may be struggling for every bit of extra room one can get. I encountered exactly this problem last month (or the month before) when I needed to single-point two #7-32 collar head screws x 1 inch long. (Don't even ask why it had to be #7-32, BTW, to my understanding there IS no #7 screw of any kind.)

    I used a dead tailstock center to support the work since single-pointing applies quite a bit of pressure and the work diameter was small. Work deflection would have required more spring passes than I was willing to spend.

    There was about two inches of room between the workholder and the dead center, not enough for me to make the parts without special tooling. So the QCTP was removed and I resorted to the lantern toolpost and Armstrong/Williams-type tool holder; the job went quickly and without drama.

    My live centers (neither are the very compact needle-bearing types) would have made the little job more tedious by taking up more working area. This sounds pretty trivial but if I had photos of the setup, the need for clawing out every cm of working space would be obvious.

    In general, I believe that live tailstock centers are necessary for high RPM work and for work so soft that a dead center would quickly "wallow out" the center hole. They are not particularly useful for much else IMO. Your lathe doesn't have a high enough spindle speed to warrant buying a live center, in my opinion. If you don't intend to turn plastic, wood and the like between centers, buy two decent carbide-tipped MT#2 "dead" centers, a standard one and one of what is called a "half" center, (Look this up and you'll see why it can be useful.)

    Any lubricant you use on a dead tailstock center is w-a-y better than none but tailstock lube needs to sustain high pressures while maintaining low-friction properties. Red lead + oil used to be employed but the EPA doesn't care for that these days. There is a specific product made for this purpose called "Center Saver". It comes in a toothpaste tube and is quite inexpensive. A tube will probably last for the rest of your life.

    FWIW, lard-based oils are generally used for cutting, BTW, rather than for lubricating.

    OK, headstock taper, a can of Sheldon worms. I do not trust my memory well enough to provide details but Sheldon used a hermaphrodite taper, unique to it's products. Something like a cross-breed of #4 and #5 IIRC. Mine is always equipped with a four-jaw chuck, never with collets, so I've not had the need to fit anything to the taper. (When turning between centers, I just turn a temporary center in the 4-jaw.)

    A sleeve for the headstock taper is something that is probably used rarely and you may not need it unless it is for collets. I have a MT#3-MT#2 reducing sleeve for my Emco-Meier lathe and I used it once about thirty years ago. It was handy that one time but I could have worked around it.

    As mentioned a couple of times already, join John Knox's forum on Yahoo. John has an encyclopedic memory and a lot of original Sheldon documentation. He is sincerely motivated to help.

    Regarding your headstock threads. Once you have removed your existing chuck and cleaned the spindle threads well, you may want to document the dimensions very carefully, as carefully as you can measure, and put them somewhere safe.

    You may never need to look at them again but on the other hand there may come a time when a spindle gage is needed because a special spindle fixture, new faceplate, lathe backplate, etc is required.

  15. #34
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    St. George, Utah
    Posts
    550
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    127
    Likes (Received)
    271

    Default

    This: Royal Spring-Type Live Centers is the most versatile live center I've ever used. It doesn't get in the way, it is extremely precise, and it self-adjusts for expansion. It also retails for around $550!! You can find them cheaper, and the original maker was a company called Concentric. I recently picked up another one of the Concentric brand, 'new old stock', for $85 from a seller on a machining forum! The Concentric is the one I started with decades ago, and the only difference is the Royal version has a better seal up front and a bolt covered oil port in the back. Don't let the slim profile fool you, they'll hold anything you care to lift onto your lathe (940lbs in the MT3).

    Just checked MSC. They retail it for $595 but with my ex-enco customer discount it is 'only' $384!

    Don't know your financial situation, but even if you have to save up for a while and watch for a deal, these are worth it.

    Honestly, I haven't putzed with a dead center in the tailstock for over 20 years. The quality live centers are every bit as accurate, especially when you consider that the dead center must be continually adjusted and lubricated, particularly on longer pieces where total expansion can be noticeable.

  16. #35
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Thanks for the info. I'll look for some "Center Saver" right away. I'll record the size and threads of the headstock once I get it off: I'll need some advice there. I will check the other forums too. I need all the help I can get. I will look into the half center too. Thanks ever so much, BILL

  17. #36
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Missouri
    Posts
    59
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    3
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    OK, Royal Spring-Type Live Centers sounds good but 500$ will stretch me right now so I will troll the enter-net for one cheaper, good luck there. Will save for it. Any more advice on removing the chuck and getting a face plate?? Thanks again. BILL

  18. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2011
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    Posts
    19,279
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    7561
    Likes (Received)
    6097

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    Thanks for the info. I'll look for some "Center Saver" right away. I'll record the size and threads of the headstock once I get it off: I'll need some advice there. I will check the other forums too. I need all the help I can get. I will look into the half center too. Thanks ever so much, BILL
    I have the original "pink slime" from Cimcool's maker, but PTS sells it undyed for lower likelihood a Wife might wonder where you have been and what you've been doing!

    Production Tool Supply

    Cheap-enough-to-be-expendable Chinese centers work, too. DC and LC. H&H Industrial has been OK. Plenty of competition.

    Better something than nothing until one can afford a Riten, Stark, Skoda, or Royal.

  19. #38
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    moscow,ohio
    Posts
    4,780
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    461
    Likes (Received)
    1444

    Default

    Riten Concentric Spring live centers New Live Center MT# 3 USA

    Riten rocks....Agree a cheapie will serve as a get me by.

    Your spindle is a short 5MT...JFK has the specs on file for a collet adapter
    For a spindle dead center you can buy a CHEAP 5MT...it will fit but stick out too far...the cheap ones are not especially hard to cut so you can just trim them in-situ to suit your needs...re-true the point as needed and toss it when it gets too short.

    What type spindle does your Sheldon have?

  20. Likes thermite liked this post
  21. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2003
    Location
    Eureka, CA, USA
    Posts
    1,651
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    353
    Likes (Received)
    262

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    .....Any more advice on removing the chuck and getting a face plate?? Thanks again. BILL
    OK, I've not had a problem removing chucks before so this is ALL intuition:

    Obtain some penetrating oil (Kroil ?) and squirt a bit into the rear joint of the backplate/spindle every day.

    Back off the chuck jaws and squirt the threaded interface, IF it can be seen (where the backplate threads onto the spindle) every day. Do this for a week or so before attempting to remove the chuck.

    Try borrowing the wife's hair dryer and warming the backplate for a while, before applying oil. Warming might allow the penetrant to seep further into the threads and some slight differential thermal expansion could help break the threads loose. Just some ideas to try - I'm sure many others have had this problem and offer better advice.

    You probably already know that it's not a good idea to put the spindle in back gear when removing/installing anything on the spindle.

    CDCO has blank, threaded cast iron backplates for your lathe at a reasonable price; you can make your own faceplate. There is an 8 inch backplate that is the near-perfect faceplate size for a ten inch lathe (Sheldons are actually 11 inch swing). Squaring the "hub" and then facing the front is not time-consuming (be careful about the cast-iron chips, they are abrasive).

    Have a friend with a mill slot the faceplate for the dog(s). BTW, dogs are inexpensively available from eBay. It's a good idea to make the slots with some angular precision if there are any multi-start threads in your future, LOL.

  22. #40
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Location
    moscow,ohio
    Posts
    4,780
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    461
    Likes (Received)
    1444

    Default

    EM is a 13" Shaldon(~13.5" actual IIRC)

    Are you sure it's a threaded spindle? If it is it will be 2 1/4"x8tpi...BUT the register is oversize at 2.280"...standard backplates work fine but must be bored to accommodate.

    Most common I see around here on 13" Sheldons is the L type spindles...might be a regional thing...a D type spindle could also be had.

    can you show a pic of your lathe?


Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •