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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    . . .can you show a pic of your lathe?
    I've seen some pics. Just a plain collar behind the chuck, no spanner slots or camlocks. (True, none of the photos were 'straight on' behind the chuck but I'm sure it is threaded.) I'll try to put the pic in this post....

    BTW, regional it may be, since I've only seen D-mounts and threaded spindles!
    bills-chuck.jpg

  2. #42
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    yup, threaded. Thanks Gordon.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    ...EM is a 13" Shaldon(~13.5" actual IIRC)...
    Thanks for the correction.

    (FWIW, The CDCO-distributed blank backplates are 2-1/4-8 and the one that I bought was a very nice fit. There was almost no movement while shaking the backplate vigorously and threaded 2/3 way onto onto the spindle nose. I've purchased a couple of things from these guys and had to send them back but this was a bargain compared to making a backplate !)

  4. #44
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    randy, no really on topic but your machine is a bit puzzling to me...a true 10" Sheldon will swing ~10.2" before hitting....there were some military contact machines that were really 11"s but were called 10"...is your machine one of those?

  5. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    randy, no really on topic but your machine is a bit puzzling to me...a true 10" Sheldon will swing ~10.2" before hitting....there were some military contact machines that were really 11"s but were called 10"...is your machine one of those?

    Your question prompted me to look at some of the paperwork that the previous owner accumulated and I found a couple of curious points. I skimmed the material six or seven years ago when I bought the lathe but hadn't looked at it since. Here's what I have:

    SHELDON "The Care And Operation Of A Lathe" (2 bound copies undated, 1 with Tony Griffith's website sticker on
    cover)

    SHELDON "Maintenance Manual And Parts Catalog, Lathe, Back-geared, Screw Cutting, Electric Motor Powered,
    Bench Type With Bench, Model 10" - 1" x 56" (bound, undated with Tony Griffith's website sticker on cover)

    DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY "Technical Manual TM-9-3416-225-12 dated November 1965" (loose-leaf dogeared copy)

    My lathe (according to serial number) was made in 1945, 20 years prior to the Army manual. I compared most of the manual drawings to the machine and can't see any difference except that the "star" clutch on mine is replaced with the newer lever clutch in the manual and I don't have the metric threading conversion. Interestingly, although by 1965, Sheldon had long replaced the single-tumbler gearbox with a twin-tumbler model, the Army manual shows a single-tumbler gearbox, like the old girl in my shop.

    From the military procurement point of view, there were likely tons of the single-tumbler models still in service in '65 and maybe they kept buying this older design to preclude spares/maintenance difficulties.

    Looking at the Sheldon maintenance manual/parts catalog, on page 3 there is a description "SHELDON Lathe, Bench, 10" Swing, 4-1/2' Bed, 1" Collet Capacity" while directly below that title the lathe is specified as having a swing over the bed and saddle wings as 11-1/4" and over the saddle as 7". (Presumably the 7" is over the cross-slide and I measured the same dimension.)

    I measured the swing at 11 inches from a turned tit on a piece of scrap to the inside edge of the front ways, the swing to the saddle wings are 10-3/4 in front and 10-1/2 at the rear saddle. To make matters more confusing, the headstock taper is specified as #5 MT, not the odd #5 taper that Sheldon normally used. I have no idea what the taper is on mine, I put the 4-jaw on within a week of purchase and it's never been removed.

    Only sleeve bearings are shown for the headstock in the Sheldon maintenance manual while the Sheldon operation manual shows sleeve, tapered roller and duplex ball-bearing spindles. The Army manual depicts only the duplex ball-bearing configuration.

    My lathe has a U.S. Government property tag on the headstock gear train cover but the configuration of the stand does not have the slanted legs (at the headstock end) that are found on the Sheldons installed in 2-1/2 ton mobile machine shop trucks. My machine is externally identical to the photo in the Sheldon Maintenance Manual.

    Maybe more confusion than clarification ?

  6. #46
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    I'm confused, but that's my normal state. Sounds like the typical collection of printed material, some of which may be 'sorta' applicable. Not so long ago getting the correct manuals, etc was pretty hard so most of us collected anything close and made the best of it.

  7. #47
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    I believe you do have one of the military "oddballs"

    Those are cool because they are built on the bed of a 13" IIRC- how wide is your bed? My 10" was about 7.5" wide.

  8. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    I believe you do have one of the military "oddballs"

    Those are cool because they are built on the bed of a 13" IIRC- how wide is your bed? My 10" was about 7.5" wide.
    The bed width on mine is 7 inches.


    FWIW, the late and much-missed J.C. Hannum wrote this:

    The late model 11" & 13" Sheldons were both built on the same heavy bed, with the same headstock. The 13" was made 1" higher, so the 11" lathe is a good, heavy machine. The 11" pedestal lathe weighs just shy of 1500#, the cabinet base about 100# less.

    Both lathes share a 60 pitch gearbox that cuts from 4 to 240 TPI, ground & scraped ways and a heavy duty underneath drive that provides 8 or 16 speeds depending on model. They usually had a 1 or 1-1/2HP industrial motor. The spindle drive is by double B belts. They are good machines and a cut above Logan and Southbend lathes in similar sizes.

    I doubt anything breaks in the apron in a heavy jam. There are two phenolic gears in the gear train that will shed teeth in event of a serious jam, I know this. Many manufacturers use this same method of protection. The leadscrew has a taper pin in the drive that can be undercut as a shear pin if this is of concern.

    Sheldon has been out of business for quite a while, there are some parts remaining, the Yahoo group should prove helpful. However, parts should not be an issue. If the lathe is as described, and not abused, there should be little need for anything.

    As described, with the tooling included, you will have a hard time finding a better lathe in this size range.

    I have a 13" ex high school Sheldon with a 56" bed. It has given me excellent service for ten years, and I see no reason that it will not last a generation or two more.

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    Seems to be no end to the variations!

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    Quote Originally Posted by randyc View Post
    . . .the late and much-missed J.C. Hannum . . .
    What do you mean, 'late'? Something happen to him?

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    My 73 YO brain (STM span=five minutes) probably un-helped by that last glass of wine, mistakenly confused him with another HSM contributor who passed away late last year. I sure hope that nothing has happened to him !!

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    Quote Originally Posted by iwananew10K View Post
    Seems to be no end to the variations!
    LOL! Surely there was!

    Ball-end on the lever of a "Walking Stick" Sheldon's variator control was a convenient "end" for its variations...


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    Now that I dragged this off topic, least I can do is try to get back on track.

    OP- Can you take an accurate measurement of the outside diameter of the end of your spindle? (The part sticking out past the spindle gear)

    What I am driving at is making a spimple split clamp to go on the end of the spindle to hold it while you remove the chuck...

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    I am sure its threaded. Took the chuck off the threads can be seen. Disconnected The Spindle From the gears, all gears, to ware it turned free. Put a 1" piece of hex in {before I removed the chuck of course} and tried an impact wrench. I Could hold the big gear pretty much by hand, but the chuck would not budge. Naturally I use penetrating oil{BLASTER} No go so far. Will apply oil for the next few days and try to loosen it ever so often. I sure hope I can remove that chuck. I will try to get some pics when the bride is here. Thanks for everything BILL

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    Yes I can get an accurate measurement. What Is a "split Clamp"?? I can probably make one if I knew what it looks like. Please explain of send me a pix. Thank you ever so much.BILL

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    For illustrative purposes- and it does not have to be round, might be easier if it isn't.
    You could make it right on the lathe,split it with a hacksaw and drill and tap,by hand....then weld on a handle....make it as wide as the spindle sticks out from the gearmand if there is room two clamping bolts would be better IMO.

    CLIMAX METAL PRODUCTS Shaft Collar,Clamp,1Pc,1'/'4 In,Steel - 29NW6'|'1C-25 - Grainger

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    I've always wondered why lathemakers don't provide a convenient means of holding the spindle while removing the chuck. All it really takes is a nice deep hole for a spanner. Maybe they hope to sell a bunch of back-gear parts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gordon Heaton View Post
    I've always wondered why lathemakers don't provide a convenient means of holding the spindle while removing the chuck. All it really takes is a nice deep hole for a spanner. Maybe they hope to sell a bunch of back-gear parts.
    The ones that need it, don't have that. The ones that do not need it do have it. Just engage the spindle lock on my ones.

    Mind - neither make has a threaded spindle or screw-on nose-art, of course.

    But there's Lybarger's Corollary to Sod's Law at work.

    "All else being equal, you lose!"

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    img_0101.jpgHere Are Some More Pics.[ATTACH=CONFIG]221254[/img_0152.jpgimg_0153.jpgimg_0155.jpgimg_0163.jpg
    Last edited by William Terry; 02-21-2018 at 09:16 AM. Reason: Attachments

  22. #60
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    Forgive the bad drawing..can't really hold a pencil anymore.

    This is how I would make the clamp, two pieces of rectangular stock drilled and bolted together, then chucked and bored to a "zero" clearance fit on the spindle end...that is to say the exact diameter of the spindle end...if you overshoot a bit a few rubs on some wet or dry will tighten it up, you want it to clamp but not compress the spindle.... You can simply weld or "stack" a handle on using the through bolts.

    image.jpg


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