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  1. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    Guess I'll stick with motor oil for now, with a brush. Gear lube didn't work out too good. Don't think I Would like the mister type for the reason you stated. But I do like the mag. base idea. Saving up for a DRO. When I can decide which one I will pull the trigger. Have had a few minor projects for friends. No $$ changes hands, except for material used. Keeping me busy, having a ball and on the learning curve. Get back to you latter. Hope it won't be too long this time. Take care and thanks to you all. WRT

    I quickly scanned several previous pages of this thread, so if I missed some critical information I apologize in advance. John Knox (former Sheldon design engineer) on the Sheldon board recommends using 10W-30 motor oil for lubricating everything (gear train, leadscrews, apron, etc., etc.), except the ways. For the ways he recommends Vactra #2.

    As for brush on cutting oil I have been using Oatey Dark Thread Cutting oil for well over 20 years.

    Oatey Dark Thread Cutting Oil

    It's great for a lubricant, but as mentioned earlier it's not a great coolant. When making deep cuts it will smoke and does smell. To help mitigate the smell I have an exhaust fan in the shop with one intake directly over the Sheldon (most used lathe in the shop) and another over the vertical mill.

    In cases where it's important to keep the smell down I use Anchorlube G-771. It's more expensive than the Oatey cutting oil, but has a minty smell. The only downside is you have to squirt in on a brush from the plastic squeeze bottle it comes in. If you leave the top off the bottle it will dry to a crusty green film.

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  3. #162
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    I'm back. Grand kids are keeping me busy, life is good. Getting familiar with lathe & mill. Trying to restore a John Deere LUC engine. I believe the head, manifold & most other bolts are #8 Hard. I wonder what is the hardness # of Cold Rolled Steel. I am thinking I can make Some of the studs, Particularly The manifold studs. They are 7/16-14 to the block, with 7/16-20 to hold the manifold, which had what I believe were brass nuts. Why would they use brass nuts to hold an intake, exhaust manifold?? Would cold rolled steel suffice?? I have used cold rolled to make Head bolts on other engines But I did not torque them fully but they are holding up. So what is the hardness of cold rolled steel. I guess I will call the vender on that Monday. Still have not decided on a DRO, mostly because of $$ But I An still looking into it. Thanks to every one. Bill.

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    It's not the hardness but the yield strength that is important for head studs. Cold rolled is about equivalent to a Grade 2 bolt, which is a far cry from a Grade 8. We always used ETD-150, which is roughly equivalent to heat treated 4140 with better machinability. Some sizes are available on eBay.
    https://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_fro...d-150&_sacat=0
    Check with the vendor if the size you need is not listed.
    If you can't find that, buy over-size Grade 8 bolts and machine them as needed. Cold rolled will not hold the necessary torque for long, it will stretch and continue to do so until it finally snaps.

    I purchased this DRO for my South Bend Heavy 10
    DRO 2 Axis digital readout with 2pcs 50 1020mm linear scale / linear encoder / linear ruler for milling lathe machine-in Level Measuring Instruments from Tools on Aliexpress.com | Alibaba Group
    I am quite happy with it.

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  6. #164
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    Thanks For the advice on the cold rolled. That DRO looks good and not to pricey. Still saving some $$ for now. Will check e-bay for the steel. Thanks a Million. WRT

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    if you have ever pulled a exhaust manifold held with steel nuts,you wouldnt ask......simple answer.....brass comes undone without dramas,like studs breaking off level with head......Modern Jap cars seem to have a rustless steel for some studs and nuts.

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    Here I am again. Enjoying my lathe & mill. But I have not been able to identify my Mill. Looks like a copy of a B.P. J head. But it says DETROIT.It has a stamped tag with the first 3 o4 letters scratched off reading ???ORNG Machine Tool Co. LTD Serial 78984 1978 8-24. I Originally thought it was ????ORING, but there is no letter I. I have not been able to come up with any MFG ending in ORNG, foreign or domestic. Every thing on this machine looks exactly like a Bridgeport But it has a 42 inch table but only 24 inch travel X Axis. The info I have been able to find leads me to think a B P with a 42' table would have 30" of travel. The Y axis is 12". Didn't measure the Z but it looks to be about 18" ware the BP calls is 18.5 which is about right. I am still thinking of getting a DRO set up. Don't look too hard to install but the options seem limitless. and now I am confused by the types. The magnetic type looks great but $$$ a lot of change. Need more info and advice. What do you guys think. Thanks BILL

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    Question

    Got Another Problem. Found A Screw While cleaning up. Think it came off my Mill. It is 11/16 Over all length, threaded 5/15-18 for 3/8 inches, the head is .735 Dia. X 5/16 slotted for regular screw driver. While looking for parts one ebay I came across bolts that seem to be the same that are called "Feed Nut Retaining Screws. I have a parts catalog for my Mill but I can't find any such part name. I have looked all over my mill but can't find any thing missing. Mill runs fine but I am weary. I know a missing or loose bolt in the wrong place can be catastrophic. Any Idea were I should take a double look??? Shure is strange. Mill has been in the same place for a while and I Clean it after each use. Any help appreciated. Thanks , WRT.

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    Tell me something. I recently acquired what I think is cold rolled steel 1/2" thick that was torch cut. It was tough to machine tile I got past the old torch cut portion. I guess torch cutting effects the steel properties. One more question, when I change Mill from high speed to low the switching is reversed. Is there something I can add to the Mill To prevent one from accidently starting it in the wrong direction?? I guess I could make my own. This is the original switch on the upper left when facing the mill. Thanks again. WRT

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    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    Tell me something. I recently acquired what I think is cold rolled steel 1/2" thick that was torch cut. It was tough to machine tile I got past the old torch cut portion. I guess torch cutting effects the steel properties. One more question, when I change Mill from high speed to low the switching is reversed. Is there something I can add to the Mill To prevent one from accidently starting it in the wrong direction?? I guess I could make my own. This is the original switch on the upper left when facing the mill. Thanks again. WRT
    Sounds like the wires on back of the switch may need to be reversed to get the motor to turn the correct direction. But, if this is a single phase motor, may involve more that switching a couple of wires. Can you post a picture of the nameplate and or of the hook up diagram on the motor?
    On the torch cut edge metal you tried to cut on. Take and dress up that edge by grinding off some of the torch cut edge. That will make it a little easier to cut on and won't be so hard on your machine and tooling.

  12. #170
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    Torch cutting does three things. It adds carbon to the steel and heats it above the critical temp. Rapid cooling from the unheated surrounding metal completes the triad. You now have flame hardened high-carbon steel.

    The low-speed gearing is the culprit that reverses the spindle direction. Yes, it can be confusing, but at least it's at low speed. You should try it on a mill with a two-speed motor and 8 position switch. I almost invariably get the wrong direction or speed. Can be unpleasant when power tapping.
    Since your switch only has forward and reverse, there's nothing to be done for it. I'm not aware of any sort of method to keep you from selecting the wrong one.

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    Actually, sounds like standard BP behavior to me. Back gear reverses the rotation, so you have to switch it the opposite way (what would have been reverse if you were not in back gear). My BP switch is marked accordingly.

    Sent from my Lenovo TB-8504F using Tapatalk

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    As awake has mentioned the spindle will reverse when changing the electrical switch from high to low speed. To actually run the spindle in the forward direction in low speed you also need to slide the head to the low speed position. There is a lever on the opposite side of the head just below the motor. The center position puts the spindle in neutral. Moving the lever to the rear engages the head in the low speed position. Moving the lever forward engages the head in the High speed position.

    Here's a quote from the Bridgeport manual:

    HI-NEUTRAL-LO LEVER
    The Hi-Neutral-Lo Lever “O”, Figure 2.13, is used to put the attachment into either back gear or
    direct drive. Rotate the spindle by hand to facilitate meshing of clutch or gears.
    Neutral is provided to permit free spindle rotation for indicating and setup work.
    In the high speed position (direct drive) the spindle is driven by tapered clutch teeth. If the clutch is
    not meshed tightly, clutch rattle will be heard. This can be corrected by loosening the two securing
    screws in lever while in high speed position. The clutch spring will automatically adjust the clutch.
    Tighten the two securing crews in lever.
    - CAUTION -
    Do not shift hi-lo lever while motor is running.

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    I think the wiring is OK. It is Three Phase. It is just that I get used to reaching up and turning Mill on When in High speed, then when I run it in Low I reach up and turn it on in the same direction on the switch it is now in reverse. It is just one of those thing I Must all ways keep in mind. Just looking for some kind of mechanical device to add to switch to prevent me from accidently turning it on in the wrong direction. I am now using a C clamp for a temporary fix. On The steel I figured it out, GRIND it down some first, you are correct.Thanks WRT

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    I believe I got all That. The problem is ,after running at one speed for a few projects, then chance speed and I will usually start it in the wrong direction. It becomes a habit to turn it in whatever direction you use the most. I installed a C clamp to prevent that then when I reverse speeds I relocate the Clamp. Perhaps I an not explaining things. The machine is fine, it is just a fault of mine and I believe others might have this problem.. Thanks I need all the help I can Get. WRT

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    You are Correct. When I change Speed now I use a C clamp to prevent me from starting in the wrong direction. I figure others have had this problem and perhaps some one has come up with a solution. All help is appreciated, thanks... WRT

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    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    You are Correct. When I change Speed now I use a C clamp to prevent me from starting in the wrong direction. I figure others have had this problem and perhaps some one has come up with a solution. All help is appreciated, thanks... WRT
    The only solution I can think of is a sensor/switch which detects when the lever is moved to low range and reverses two of the power leads to the motor. Could be accomplished with a double pole double throw relay.

    Despite all the advances, there is still no substitute for an alert, aware operator.

  20. #177
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    An alert operator is the key. I also know how hard it is to fix "STUPID". I guess I am thinking TOO far out of the box. Thanks any way. WRT

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    I may try that OATEY stuff. The used motor oil seems almost like honey [I use Shell Rotela ] It sticks a little much. Used Oatey on pipe threader in the past didn't mind the smell then. Thanks a lot. WRT

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    Quote Originally Posted by William Terry View Post
    I guess I am thinking TOO far out of the box. WRT
    Not at all. You got me thinking about it. Lots of clever designs have started just this way. I'll post when I've applied for the patent.

  23. #180
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    It sounds like the mystery screw is the one that keeps you from cranking the table up too far. It goes in the column directly behind the table. Look to see if you have the screw in there or just a hole


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