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  1. #41
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    if only you could retrofit the haas mocon control to better iron... like a boxway okuma
    or mori or toyoda . most fanuc controls i've used just plain suck-ass compared to my
    '99 vf control. unintuitive and frustrating . i almost prefer bpt BOSS controls .
    the fadal CNC88 wasn't bad . haas just makes so many machines, that they have
    the bugs ironed out. if you need to hog steel , get the 50 taper.

    if you're looking at 30 taper machines...you aren't doing much hogging anyway.

  2. #42
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    Going by the title anfo is cheaper then dynamite or c4 for the bang per buck.
    Bil lD.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill D View Post
    Going by the title anfo is cheaper then dynamite or c4 for the bang per buck.
    Bil lD.
    Yeah but blast velocities are different...right tool for the job.

  4. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcoope View Post
    I think there is a lot of nonsense about Haas around but I do think the "starter machine" notion comes from the fact a lot of people start with TMs and especially VF-2s. These arguably really are starter machines where the VF-2 for example is a bit smaller but half the weight of the VF-3.
    A VF-2 is 48% of the work volume of a VF-3 but weighs 58% as much. Not sure I see your point.

  5. #45
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    I have seen a lot of guys post up on the vf2 to vf3 or vf4 size thing ,,, They seem to think that being twice the weight its going to be twice as ridged or have twice the power . the two size machines share the same hardware for the most part and have the same spindle, spindle motor and well the weight of the bigger vf3 or vf4 machines would make one think was more ridged there not .. I run a vf2ss and a vf4ss side by side for 4 years and the smaller vf2 is more ridged ,,

  6. #46
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    If you asked me before three years ago I would have said that Haas makes garage-shop machines. Now I've been doing medical device prototyping and production (mostly Ti6Al4V and 17-4 H900) on a 2015 VF-3SS with trunnion for three years, and the only thing it doesn't do well is live five. For 3 axis and 3+2 it's hard to find anything to complain about. We did get it tricked out with all the options, so it was around $150k including trunnion.

  7. #47
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    You mention long cycles with lots of surfacing using small tools. For this situation the most important aspects will be spindle speed and axis acceleration.

    The Robodrill has a 24k spindle option. The brother has a 27k. I'm not sure of the Haas.

    The Robodrill and Brother can both do 1.5G+ in acceleration. I'm not sure of the Haas, but I doubt it's close given my experience with other machines.

    I count myself among those who are skeptical of Haas. They are typically less rigid than machines of comparable work envelope from other vendors (and contrary to what some have said, stiffness is just as important in finishing at high traverse speeds as it is hogging at low speeds). Plus the whole "Haaspower" thing gives me the impression of the machines being of lesser substance than "real" industrial tools.

  8. #48
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    Thought i’d update the thread. I now have the new machine up and running. It was installed last week and so far it runs great. After some discussion with the salesman i ended up with a Haas VF2-SS, with WIPS, TSC, Pcool, HSM, chip auger and some other good to have options. Maybe not the fastest machine on the market but it’s good enough for me.

    Thank you all for great input.

    Regards


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