New welding table- painted top removal ideas - Page 3
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  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by EPAIII View Post
    Why not the front yard. Put on a pot of coffee, light up the table top, settle down in a lawn chair, and get to meet the local fire department.

    A few cans of cold brew may be good too.
    It will be all out within 2-3 minutes....

    fire is soooo overrated.

    allot of people have open flames in their houses....

  2. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by GregSY View Post
    You could start sandblasting it in your front yard, acting like it's a ton of fun. Pretty soon, some other guys would show up and ask if they could do some sandblasting, too. Before long, you could be sitting in the shade, enjoying a glass of lemonade, while you watch them do it all.
    ROFL.

    Like Tom Sawyer. Maybe they would even trade their old HF lathe for the chance to do 15 min. of blasting.

  3. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by bosleyjr View Post
    The only "paint" that I think would be resistant to sandblasting is powdercoat. Powdercoat is pretty tough and elastic so sand blasting warms it up and turns it into glue. Then it cools and you have abrasive mixed in.

    To remove powdercoat from bike frames, I think they use a mix of abrasive and dry ice. If nothing else works....
    I've run into plain old machinery paint, when applied really thick is a problem.

    automobile "rubberized" undercoating, and others.

  4. #44
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    I use the removal discs from Lehigh valley abrasives. They are like open scotchbrite dipped in acrylic. They are amazing at removing rust, paint, things like that, but dont hit an edge. It will shred and you will loose the whole wheel in 1 second.

    Sent from my SM-G960U using Tapatalk

  5. #45
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    Gilsonite?
    Some old black paint is really this odd type of asphalt. Naturally occurring, it used to be common

  6. #46
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    Depending on whether it's really hard too, if so it could be stoved enamel (the "vitreous" type, also used on cast iron bathtubs etc.)? IF it is, no chemical is going to remove it as it's basically fused glass (well, Hydrofluoric acid might, but not fun to work with...)

    Dave H. (the other one)

  7. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grnmtntri11 View Post
    Also notice the stamped numbers I found punched into the top. Im curious as to where this table has been used in the past..
    Those numbers stamped in the top are the result of some guy just checking to see he has the punch correctly oriented prior to numbering his part. I do that all the time on a piece of scrap steel or wood since (I can tell you from experience) an inverted “5” looks real crappy. on a part..... ;-)

  8. #48
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    Ha yeah i bet
    So it was most likely in a factory setting creating machines or tools you think?
    Wish I had Some background on it. Bought it from a guy who had it sitting out in the woods for years.


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