Newer 5 Flute Aluminum Roughers
Close
Login to Your Account
Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default Newer 5 Flute Aluminum Roughers

    I have typically been running GWS alumigator 3 flute chipbreaker roughing end mills in aluminum (1010 Series) - and have always loved them. I use them in 3/16, 1/4", and 1/2". I need a 3/4" for deeper work and deciding which route to go.

    I saw that GWS rolled out their 5 flute coolant thru version that appears to compete with the BOOOOOOOOOOM KOR5 from kennametal the new end mill that is being super-marketed.

    Wondering if anyone has tried this new style end mill vs the typical 3 flute roughers. I usually stay <%30 on radial stepover so it may work well for me. However, sometimes I also use my rougher for shallower wider cuts depending on the part.

    I would probably go with GWS as I am pretty loyal, but curious to hear. Was leaning on going with the tried and true 3 flute in 3/4" but this is a good opportunity to try something new.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1978
    Likes (Received)
    644

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motox2121 View Post
    I have typically been running GWS alumigator 3 flute chipbreaker roughing end mills in aluminum (1010 Series) - and have always loved them. I use them in 3/16, 1/4", and 1/2". I need a 3/4" for deeper work and deciding which route to go.

    I saw that GWS rolled out their 5 flute coolant thru version that appears to compete with the BOOOOOOOOOOM KOR5 from kennametal the new end mill that is being super-marketed.

    Wondering if anyone has tried this new style end mill vs the typical 3 flute roughers. I usually stay <%30 on radial stepover so it may work well for me. However, sometimes I also use my rougher for shallower wider cuts depending on the part.

    I would probably go with GWS as I am pretty loyal, but curious to hear. Was leaning on going with the tried and true 3 flute in 3/4" but this is a good opportunity to try something new.

    Thanks
    they're really only worth using on machines that can move REALLY fast, or if you're machining parts where the machine can reach its higher speed to keep your MRR constant.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Colorado
    Posts
    385
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    63
    Likes (Received)
    196

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by empwoer View Post
    they're really only worth using on machines that can move REALLY fast, or if you're machining parts where the machine can reach its higher speed to keep your MRR constant.
    Ehh I dunno, I may agree with that or disagree. I have a few KOR5 on hand and they are really good. I eventually went back to my helical solutions 3 fluters because I had a bunch of jobs and couldn't spend any time messing with new tooling. Now that things have slowed down I want to get it back up there. I was getting 30 cubic inches removal in aluminum which is pretty good for our little 15hp spindles. The helical ones can do that too, so they are pretty comparable.

    NOW...what is BAD about them is that they have very small flute gullets. So basically what happened was this: I put a new piece of stock in without adjusting the dynamic mill operation for the larger stock size. Well KOR5 tool goes at it and rounds one corner into a FULL SLOT cut at 320IPM. Needless to say, the endmill snapped clean off at the base of the toolholder. Collet destroyed. Im pretty sure that a 3fl Helical tool would have handled that extreme situation much better, as in, it might not have snapped and instead just totally filled the flutes up with melted aluminum and maybe ripped the part out of the fixture.

    So empwoer is pretty right...they are specifically designed for peel milling/trochoidal cutting. I've done 30% stepovers with them but I wouldn't want to push the stepover much higher. I guess you could if you slow the feed down but who wants to do that?

    In the end I still don't have enough data to say whether they are that much better than what we were using previously. I will say that they leave a nice finish if you want to finish with the same tool. I want to keep testing and dialing in my parameters to get the best results.

    Does your machine accel/decel really fast? Ours are middle of the pack with that. They're no RoboDrill but they aren't slowing down in corners like some Haas machines. They have enough lookahead to maintain the programmed feedrate at all times. You need to have machines that can do that...running smaller pockets with a true programmed feed rate is what will get you the gains they offer. If the machine can't cut at 500ipm I wouldn't even try them. Not saying that you'll want to cut at 500, but if the machine maxes out feeds at 250 then it isn't worth it IMO

  4. Likes empwoer liked this post
  5. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1978
    Likes (Received)
    644

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by metalmadness View Post
    Ehh I dunno, I may agree with that or disagree. I have a few KOR5 on hand and they are really good. I eventually went back to my helical solutions 3 fluters because I had a bunch of jobs and couldn't spend any time messing with new tooling. Now that things have slowed down I want to get it back up there. I was getting 30 cubic inches removal in aluminum which is pretty good for our little 15hp spindles. The helical ones can do that too, so they are pretty comparable.

    NOW...what is BAD about them is that they have very small flute gullets. So basically what happened was this: I put a new piece of stock in without adjusting the dynamic mill operation for the larger stock size. Well KOR5 tool goes at it and rounds one corner into a FULL SLOT cut at 320IPM. Needless to say, the endmill snapped clean off at the base of the toolholder. Collet destroyed. Im pretty sure that a 3fl Helical tool would have handled that extreme situation much better, as in, it might not have snapped and instead just totally filled the flutes up with melted aluminum and maybe ripped the part out of the fixture.

    So empwoer is pretty right...they are specifically designed for peel milling/trochoidal cutting. I've done 30% stepovers with them but I wouldn't want to push the stepover much higher. I guess you could if you slow the feed down but who wants to do that?

    In the end I still don't have enough data to say whether they are that much better than what we were using previously. I will say that they leave a nice finish if you want to finish with the same tool. I want to keep testing and dialing in my parameters to get the best results.

    Does your machine accel/decel really fast? Ours are middle of the pack with that. They're no RoboDrill but they aren't slowing down in corners like some Haas machines. They have enough lookahead to maintain the programmed feedrate at all times. You need to have machines that can do that...running smaller pockets with a true programmed feed rate is what will get you the gains they offer. If the machine can't cut at 500ipm I wouldn't even try them. Not saying that you'll want to cut at 500, but if the machine maxes out feeds at 250 then it isn't worth it IMO
    you're kinda making my point. they are meant to take LIGHT radial cuts at high speed. if your machine isnt capable of accelerating fast in tight turns, they're a waste of time/money IMO - you'd be better off with a 3 flute, take a wider radial cut at slower speed, while maintaining your MRR.

  6. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2020
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Florida
    Posts
    23
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    15
    Likes (Received)
    2

    Default

    Say you had a really tightly toleranced part that you can't clamp onto very hard. If you had to rough a feature on a 2nd op in a less than ideal fixture, which approach would put less tool pressure / force on the part ? Would a smaller radial stepover with a faster feed put less force on the part, at equivalent MRR?

  7. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    California
    Posts
    1,194
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    1978
    Likes (Received)
    644

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by motox2121 View Post
    Say you had a really tightly toleranced part that you can't clamp onto very hard. If you had to rough a feature on a 2nd op in a less than ideal fixture, which approach would put less tool pressure / force on the part ? Would a smaller radial stepover with a faster feed put less force on the part, at equivalent MRR?
    smaller radial/more feed would be less force on the part.

  8. #7
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Country
    UNITED STATES
    State/Province
    Tennessee
    Posts
    244
    Post Thanks / Like
    Likes (Given)
    139
    Likes (Received)
    95

    Default

    Never used one. What I’m hearing is it takes a very good, fast machine to keep up with what it’s capable of. Which means you could be paying for a premium Kennametal tool when a GWS Alumigator or YG1 AluPower would be fine. But if you do have that fancy fast machine and parts that are mostly profiling, let it rip... us, a Haas shop? We’d never use it. No need in even trying.

  9. Likes empwoer liked this post

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •