Nice looking Tovaglieri lathe
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  1. #1
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    Default Nice looking Tovaglieri lathe

    I've never heard of this one, but looks to be pretty stout. And with a touch of style at the base.

    18"x8" lathe - tools - by owner - sale

    Also pictured in: Tovaglieri Lathes

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    "The patternmakers been in the sauce again, What should we doo about it ?"

    "Run it, We'll paint pinstripes on it...It worked for Enzo, it will work for us too "

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    That looks like a lovely machine that would clean up well. Copy says it's a one-owner machine with original accessories and manual. Massively too big for a home shop guy, though, and nobody else will care that it's so pretty.

    Some pics from the ad, for posterity.

    tovaglieri2.jpg

    tovaglieri1.jpg

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    Well, you gonna buy it, Ray?

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    nobody else will care that it's so pretty.
    Pretty well describes why many magnificent machine tools ended up scrapped eventually. Another thing that cools ardor is the unknown, many people worry about replacement parts.
    That's a large machine though, like you say, not a home shop toy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by steve45 View Post
    Well, you gonna buy it, Ray?
    Nah, not even considering it........much.

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    I'm not really in the market - but it does give a man pause... that thing is beautiful!

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    Italy has a good machinery manufacturing sector. We deal in a lot of their textile stuff (leather working machinery), and also have an old Horizontal mill from the 70's or so.

    They have a range; higher quality, lower quality, and in between, and as such we've also seen machines that range from grey tin boxes, to intricate aluminum castings for cosmetic appeal. They build to fit the need like the rest of us do, but will throw in some flair every now and then. "Italian leather" is still a thing because they care about fine goods over there, while the better part of America went with the Wal-mart approach to life.

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    Certainly has a unique casting!Looks to be plenty stout.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Ray Behner View Post
    Nah, not even considering it........much.
    Really? ...come on Ray, you know you want to tell us all about it, ……………….............you do, ............................just think how nice it will be when you've come clean.



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    Now you know why I have one " Alfa-Romeo " after another.

    I like how they've sloped the top of the casting above the feed box. That stops guys chucking tools on top of the feed box and ruining the paintwork and any data plate that might be there. Ok so they pile everything on top of headstock cover but at least you can put a rubber mat in there.

    They've got the long travel hand wheel in the " sensible " position.

    A question for the pro turners on here- Sami are you reading this ? ------
    The screwcutting dial is on the right hand side of the carriage. I think it should be on the left hand side, the less distance your eye has to travel the better when you're screw cutting.

    I was a machine tool fitter. I can turn but I'm not a pro. I've worked with guys who could turn anything you put in front of them so I know the difference. What do you think about the position of the dial ?

    Regards Tyrone.

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    I prefer the dial on the right, .apart from that being where most lathes I've used have had their dials, the right side of the apron is further away from the tool and all the crap coming off it.

    When using the threading dial - I only watch the dial for half nut engagement, ..disengagement I'm watching the tool.

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    Tyrone

    As per the authoritative reply from Sami hafta say I'm firmly in the threading dial on the right camp. But I'm no pro either.

    Way I see it the only time you need to look at a threading dial is when engaging the half nut so the tool will generally be clear of the work. Having the job out of direct eyeline is of little consequence. Half nut, or third shaft lever on machines like my Pratt & Witney, are almost invariable right of centre too do your attention is going to be that way.

    Having it on the left puts it in the flying chip line of fire so its likely to be abraded over time. On gearbox equipped lathes a left side dial tends to be the travel limiter when going towards the headstock, maybe so much so that excessive tool or topside overhang is needed when working close up with a collet. Also tends to get in the way of a turret type bedstop. Which would seriously upset my working mode. My scrap bin find 6 position turret stop has been on at least 6 lathes so far. Not fitted any properly but all well enough to be indispensable. Never made up my mind whether the monster tube style multi-stop thingy sometimes seen hanging off the right hand side of the apron on old style Colchester Student, Masters and Triumph counts as a good idea or overthinking a work around 'cos the threading dial on the left gets in the way.

    As a pragmatic Sussex country boy I'm permanently unconvinced by the Italian style argument. All too often style is an excuse for not spending enough time getting the basics right. I'll admit to really liking my Lancia HPE Auto but there were times when the idea of fricasseed Italian designer for dinner was, ahem, "tempting". Like having to pull off glued down trim to get at one of the relay and fuse boxes is good idea! And the less said about the braking system the better. Even if I did get it half price 'cos the brakes seized the day before I was going to buy it.

    Clive.

    PS Slow on the keys today!

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    Let's look at the facts....

    1. The lathe is in OHIO
    2. Ray is in OHIO

    Nuf said....

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Let's look at the facts....

    1. The lathe is in OHIO
    2. Ray is in OHIO

    Nuf said....
    Aw c'mon man. Do I hafta?
    Actually would like to take a look at her. Problem is, I've got to think of getting this joint sold out pretty soon 'for I croak off.

  23. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clive603 View Post
    Tyrone

    As per the authoritative reply from Sami hafta say I'm firmly in the threading dial on the right camp. But I'm no pro either.

    Way I see it the only time you need to look at a threading dial is when engaging the half nut so the tool will generally be clear of the work. Having the job out of direct eyeline is of little consequence. Half nut, or third shaft lever on machines like my Pratt & Witney, are almost invariable right of centre too do your attention is going to be that way.

    Having it on the left puts it in the flying chip line of fire so its likely to be abraded over time. On gearbox equipped lathes a left side dial tends to be the travel limiter when going towards the headstock, maybe so much so that excessive tool or topside overhang is needed when working close up with a collet. Also tends to get in the way of a turret type bedstop. Which would seriously upset my working mode. My scrap bin find 6 position turret stop has been on at least 6 lathes so far. Not fitted any properly but all well enough to be indispensable. Never made up my mind whether the monster tube style multi-stop thingy sometimes seen hanging off the right hand side of the apron on old style Colchester Student, Masters and Triumph counts as a good idea or overthinking a work around 'cos the threading dial on the left gets in the way.

    As a pragmatic Sussex country boy I'm permanently unconvinced by the Italian style argument. All too often style is an excuse for not spending enough time getting the basics right. I'll admit to really liking my Lancia HPE Auto but there were times when the idea of fricasseed Italian designer for dinner was, ahem, "tempting". Like having to pull off glued down trim to get at one of the relay and fuse boxes is good idea! And the less said about the braking system the better. Even if I did get it half price 'cos the brakes seized the day before I was going to buy it.

    Clive.

    PS Slow on the keys today!
    Hi Clive , Italian cars are made to go, not to stop.

    Regards Tyrone.

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    That lathe is massive for an 18". First thing that caught my eye is the girth and length of the compound rest. Second thing was the huge center pedestal and the traveling support for the leadscrew and feed shaft.

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    The huge sloping base casting with what appears to be an integral coolant tank caught my eye. They obviously weren't short of cast iron in Italy in those days.
    Reading the description on Tony's site that particular one is obviously the top of the range " Ceramic " version.

    Regards Tyrone

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    Using the craigslist adverts map location, and Ray's
    City....Road trip !
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails leetonia-trip.jpg  

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    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    Using the craigslist adverts map location, and Ray's
    City....Road trip !
    If he goes to see that he won't be coming home alone.

    Regards Tyrone.

  29. Likes Ray Behner liked this post

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