O/T - Bonding thin aluminum sheet to composite board? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Man up and use the contact cement, Its not hard to set the sheet just right. Put a stop blocks on the long side and hinge the sheet down...easy...Phil

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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post

    My supplier now stocks poly glues that have variable open times. This is a fantastic bit of progress over the one type fits all original product with quite a short open time. The range is something like 20,40 and 60 minutes. When I made the roller I had only one choice of poly glue open time, now with the longer open time I can do larger projects with multiple layers which is handy when doing veneer layups and curved work.
    Michael, can you tell us the brand poly glue you are using? Having longer open time could be very useful.

  4. #23
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    Richard,
    The glue is made by Loctite, I buy it through Richelieu hardware as I have an account.
    It has 10,20,30, 60 and 70 minute cure time choices and a 2 minute one as well.
    I mostly use Klieberit poly glue also from Richelieu and they have two products, the standard is PUR501 which has a 20-25 minute open time and the 502 product which has a 120 minute open time.
    For some reason I thought the 502 was for plastics but is say it is good for wood as well so I may try that next time I need a longer open time. It also says the 502 is for aluminum.

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    Thanks Michael

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    Does the use of urethane adhesive require sheet vacuum bagging to achieve a uniformly flat bond?

    Gorilla glue expands like crazy! ;-)

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    CalG,
    Most glues including poly glues need a certain amount of pressure to properly bond. It really does not matter what you use to create the pressure. A vacuum bag does work well but so does a hand press or a hydraulic press. The longer open time poly glues do not expand as much as the shorter cure time types, although I have not used the loctite short glues, they may not foam as much. I also found the Gorilla glue to be too highly viscous for my liking.

    The Kleiberit has a nice viscosity and spreads well as did the Loctite. I used the Kleiberit to bond some burl wood veneer to a steel substrate and the bond was excellent. That was done in a vacuum press given the curve of the 3/8" thick steel plate. You can see the work in my profile photo but it is a bit of a small image.

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    Michael, when you glued the burl veneer, did you get a lot of squeeze thru? I've found that to be a problem with epoxy, had to prime the veneer with a very thin spread, wait til it thickened, then add another thin spread and glue with pressure. We used to weigh the epoxy out to get the correct spread. Worked fine, but a PIA!

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    Quote Originally Posted by M. Moore View Post
    CalG,
    Most glues including poly glues need a certain amount of pressure to properly bond. It really does not matter what you use to create the pressure. A vacuum bag does work well but so does a hand press or a hydraulic press. The longer open time poly glues do not expand as much as the shorter cure time types, although I have not used the loctite short glues, they may not foam as much. I also found the Gorilla glue to be too highly viscous for my liking.

    The Kleiberit has a nice viscosity and spreads well as did the Loctite. I used the Kleiberit to bond some burl wood veneer to a steel substrate and the bond was excellent. That was done in a vacuum press given the curve of the 3/8" thick steel plate. You can see the work in my profile photo but it is a bit of a small image.

    Yes

    I was thinking of the OP and the 5 foot X 18" panels. That is a rather large "press", but easily constructed on a suitable table with timber and wedges. etc. Myself, I am still in the past with epoxy lamination, molds and vacuum bags/tables.

    Ahh the freedoms of contact adhesive and flat work ;-)

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    No problems with bleed through with the poly glue. Any that did was easily sanded off. Other veneers may be different so a test would be prudent. My guess is that most would be fine.

  11. #30
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    Calg,
    I think a vacuum bag is pretty modern tech and is a great way to press large items. My bag can handle 4’ x 10’ and the largest project I did was 4’ x 9’, it just fit into the bag. Epoxy is my least favourite glue, I never use it except to repair my golf clubs.

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    I used epoxy for all my veneer work back when I was making furniture. Originally because it was difficult to get my first shop warm enuf for urea resin glue in the winter. But I liked that it introduced no water to my panels and made them much more stable, so I started using it exclusively. Also never had any blisters, great bonding, hate doing repairs!

    Admittedly very low output of one-off, high end furniture, wouldn't use it for any quantity production.

    And I don't use it on my banjos. Some luthiers like it for gluing ebony and rosewoods, but in testing I found the old Titebond Regular (now Titebond Extend) got stronger bonds on ebony than West System. I think most people don't realize that the acidity of Titebond helps it to bond well on oily woods.

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    Hot hide glue. Spread the glue on the doors and it will dry in a few minutes. When the glue is cool lay the aluminum on the door. Heat the metal with a heat gun and used a laminate roller to finish. Roll from the middle out to the edges. If you make a mistake, re-heat and re-position. When the glue cools, usually less then 5 minutes then you are done.
    A cheap crock pot and a candy thermometer will do for a electric glue pot.
    Do a search and the info will get you started. I bought 5 lbs of hide glue flakes 15 years ago. The flakes do not go bad.
    mike


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