O.T. Drainage system - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    If I had a basement that nice I would have had a float alarm that works off a battery.....
    If I had a basement that nice I would practically live in it.

    Or, maybe the rest of the house is even nicer.......

  2. #22
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    If you have city water, I would highly recommend a water powered backup pump. I've never had the water to the house fail in any sort of emergency. My unit pumbs about a gallon of water out for a gallon of city water. I know if I had a battery pump, the day I needed it I would realize that the battery was old an dead.

    I would suggest that you do not use corrugated if you can avoid it.

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  4. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by wheels17 View Post
    If you have city water, I would highly recommend a water powered backup pump. I've never had the water to the house fail in any sort of emergency. My unit pumbs about a gallon of water out for a gallon of city water. I know if I had a battery pump, the day I needed it I would realize that the battery was old an dead.

    I would suggest that you do not use corrugated if you can avoid it.
    Why not corrugated?

  5. #24
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    The the last 3 years here we have had record amounts of rain. There seems to be no letup with it and this spring is no different. I recently moved into a house that probably had only minor issues during "normal" years in the past. Now I dread any signs of heavy rains. I installed 3 new pumps, a submerged, a shallow well pump on the floor and another submerged that will run on 110 volts and switch to 12 volts if the power goes out. Those pumps have been running a LOT. Still not satisfied, am thinking about exterior french drains around the perimeter. What a PITA. My biggest concern with that is finding an outfit that will do what I want to the letter, not install some BS system that they are peddling. If you want to find lots of conflicting information start looking at french drain systems . What a can of worms. Good luck with your H20 issues.

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  7. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmach10 View Post
    Why not corrugated?

    Corrugated gets crap stuck across the pipe in the corrugations. Smooth pipe it just slides along. And, just try to clear it without digging it up.....

    Rigid smooth pipe is the way to go. The stuff with the holes along it if you need the water to come in all along. Some say put the holes on the bottom , some say the top. Stuff jams less if they are at the top, probably, but it leaves more water in the gravel.

  8. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by eKretz View Post
    If I had a basement that nice I would have had a float alarm ...
    After any kind of rain that crock would fill and the pump could barely keep up. I ended up installing a second pump on top of the first. During heavy rains both pumps would be running. An alarm would be going off constantly and I would have ended up removing it.




    Quote Originally Posted by digger doug View Post
    If I had a basement that nice....I'd get on an excavator and run a drain (use a xsit) out to where I got some fall.

    No electricity, no pumps involved at all.
    Back in the day, this was all farmland. Everything is pretty much flat. There is a 35 acre field behind the house that used to do a pretty good job of holding the water until a developer bought it, brought in dirt to regrade it higher than the surrounding land and built 105 cluster homes on it. Now the runoff floods all the yards on the street.

    Quote Originally Posted by ChipSplitter View Post
    If I had a basement that nice I would practically live in it.

    Or, maybe the rest of the house is even nicer.......
    The rest of the house was nice too, but just a cookie cutter 2000 sq ft colonial.



    All the houses on the street were built in the '50s on slabs. Mine was built in '91 with a basement.
    When we moved in in '99 I didn't even have a working sump pump for 3 yrs. No water at all.

    After they built the development, the water problems got worse. Over the years more than 1000 new homes have been built, totally destroying the natural land and over-taxing what little infrastructure there is. All the neighbors are livid. The township and the county can't decide whose problem it is or what could be done about it.


    I finished the basement in '06, the flood picture was about '10. It flooded one more time during the remnants of Hurricane Sandy in '12. We lost power for three days. The water was higher than in that picture.

    We sold the house in '16 and my new house is built into a hillside with a walk-out basement.
    No sump pump, no drainage problems.


    Edit:

    This is a yard down the street 2 weeks ago. They got 3" of rain in a couple hrs.

    water1.jpg

    water2.jpg

    water3.jpg

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  10. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by gmach10 View Post
    .......".....The real cost is in the labor to open the floor for the pit and tiles. .......
    Not far from me is a company that hires out temp construction labor. I’ve used them a number of times, usually unskilled laborers to do stuff around my farm. That way I’m the one standing there running the show and they are the ones with the young healthy backs doing the heavy lifting. Probably one in your area.

  11. #28
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    check out Best French Drain and Yard Drainage Contractor | Macomb, Oakland, Lapeer, St Clair County, MI

    This is the stuff we used, be sure to watch his videos also. Tons of great information. We did 4-6 pipes around the new building, no rock under the pipe and their double punched geo paper. Stuff works great.

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  13. #29
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    My wife's old house was in Downers Grove and sprouted a small creek across the basement floor in those kind of rains. We planned to finish out the basement and the floor was cracked and out of level anyway, so we had a guy excavate the outside perimeter & put in a drain to an interior sump. Pump had a battery backup & we used it. Don't forget to drill a small drainback hole in the ejector pipe, and use heat tape on the pipe if there is any chance it could freeze. The house had beautiful landscaping and the backhoe guy did a great job of extracting shrubs, etc and getting everything back in alive, then we pumped in self levelling concrete and laid a prefinished floor in there. Worked great. This was over 15 years ago so I doubt if the guy is still around.

  14. #30
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    If you lived in the west Spanish water laws would be on your side. You can not just divert water around with no concern for folks downstream. What about the land that no longer gets the water off that property? they should also sue for damages. they would be more likely to collect since they have lost something valuable.
    Bill D.


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