O/T rebuilding older dirtbike shock- What's involved? - Page 2
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  1. #21
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    used shocks are...used shocks.

    the Showa is rebuildable....as soon as i remember ill post who i used to get kits from....they also rebuilt in house too.

    edit- i think it was race tech like another poster mentioned.

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    Late 70's, friend's father had a Yamaha TT500. I think it had a Basani pipe on it. I still remember the sound that thing made when he would drive it up and down the street through all 4 (5?) gears with the front wheel a few feet up in the air. It was as glorious a moment as we had ever seen.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CarbideBob View Post
    Can't hurt to take it apart,,, ,make sure it is depressurized and you need to have the stuff to repressurize it.
    The "nut guy" maybe not that far off on concerns.
    What is available as a "replacement" shock of a maybe slight different design? Would this be a workable option?

    Sleeving a worn is very fussy work and sometimes not much stock on that bore to work with.
    I used to play with valving ports and oils for different tracks so I'd have a bunch "handmade hobby stuff" and swap around.
    Much,,much guess and check, the big guys have "shock dynos" for tuning even back in the days with two shocks on the back end.
    A US source for a lot of seals, bands and such is :https://herculesus.com/
    The oil weight used to refill makes a HUGE difference as does the pressure within 1 PSI.

    I am all in favor of rip it apart, inspect and try. It does not work now, there is no downside other than time spent and few dollars.
    The big part of any fix is is always inspect, why did it fail?
    A really good builder will also ask rider weight, use and riding style and recommend a spring. This is the insane expensive world. Doubt you need that.
    Bob
    The downside is most mechanics have "if you've already fucked with it" pricing

  5. #24
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    OK, I looked it up. The body is a small 36mm, but the shaft is dead normal Showa 14mm.
    Assuming you use RaceTech parts, you want an oil and dust seal kit SSDS14S
    .
    If you're going to do it, you'll want a new bladder too. A pricey little hunk of rubber, but in anything over 10 ro 15 years old, all but obligatory. SKBL 400088 . Be careful on disassembly. One that old can have bled presure through into the (supposedly) unpressurized oil side. So even if you've let the gas out through the schrader, you may still be somewhat pressuized. You'll know if the shaft still re-extends after pressing it in. If youre' luckly, just a bite in the butt to press the sealhead (gland/seal housing) in to release the clip. Be careful,sometimes the sealhead of pressurized one hang on the Oring in the clip groove, and then let's go and mangles your fingers or put the shaft into your face. Not a euphemism. Hope that helps.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rogpmc View Post
    OK, I looked it up. The body is a small 36mm, but the shaft is dead normal Showa 14mm.
    Assuming you use RaceTech parts, you want an oil and dust seal kit SSDS14S
    .
    If you're going to do it, you'll want a new bladder too. A pricey little hunk of rubber, but in anything over 10 ro 15 years old, all but obligatory. SKBL 400088 . Be careful on disassembly. One that old can have bled presure through into the (supposedly) unpressurized oil side. So even if you've let the gas out through the schrader, you may still be somewhat pressuized. You'll know if the shaft still re-extends after pressing it in. If youre' luckly, just a bite in the butt to press the sealhead (gland/seal housing) in to release the clip. Be careful,sometimes the sealhead of pressurized one hang on the Oring in the clip groove, and then let's go and mangles your fingers or put the shaft into your face. Not a euphemism. Hope that helps.
    That really is awesome, Thank you!

    What do you want to rebuild my shock? I don't know you from Adam, but you've been extremely helpful.

    I could crack mine open and see how bad it is inside before shipping it- Make sure it's worth it.

  8. #26
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    Hi
    You're very welcome. I was just trying to help, not drum up business, but glad to do it if you'd like. PM me and we can exchange contact info. I'm just here to learn from all of you. I'll post some info for you below that will either tell you how to make it cheaper if you want to farm it out to me, or will help you to better do it yourself if you so choose.

    I'll tell you in general, a good rebuild including bladder, (which for years were about 20 bucks, but have inexplicably doubled in the last year) is normally about 150ish labor and a hundred in parts. And that's if the cap still seals. If you want to pull it apart and do a couple things it will be less. Like most work, it's the knowledge and preparation that take time and money, not the simple build.

    Things that help include.

    Disassembly and thorough cleaning (with not damage to anything, which is probably a given talking to a machinst, unlike Joe Blow consumer who generally does more harm than good.

    Those include
    1) Removing bladder and cap, without gouging bore and seeing that the clip and groove are smooth and deburred

    2) Removing shaft assembly and sealhead, again, without gouging bore and seeing that the clip and groove are smooth and deburred

    3) [and this is the biggie). Remove the shaft nut. Normally peened or staked. That needs to ground or machined off so the nut comes off smoothly, but with minimal loss of theads (after all, there are not that many holding things together, and though 8 threads are nearly as good as 10 on something long, 3 are a lot worse than 5). And as the kicker, on some, which you never know in except in retrospect, that peening can have a double purpose. It holds on the nut outside the shaft (remove that part) and can hold in part of the rebound bleed/adjuster) (don't go slightly too far and remove the inner portion of the peening.
    That's the part that any honest shock tech will tell you can be a bit nerve racking, and once in a while sees a guy having to go buy a donor shock on ebay.

    That stuff I would guess all, once warned, more in your wheelhouse than mine. I'm just a shock tech (and electrical engineer -- long story) who tries to borrow techniques and tools from you machinists to be a better more capable shock tech.

    Cheers
    Roger


    Quote Originally Posted by Garwood View Post
    That really is awesome, Thank you!

    What do you want to rebuild my shock? I don't know you from Adam, but you've been extremely helpful.

    I could crack mine open and see how bad it is inside before shipping it- Make sure it's worth it.


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